A few factors on which agricultural development depends

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Climatic factors such as light, water, and rainfall, temperature, air, relative humidity and wind also affect farming in various ways. Just like other abiotic elements of environmental factors such as soil and topography, they influence how crops grow and develop.

The important factors influencing agriculture are as follows:
  • Natural Factors: The natural factors that affect agriculture most are: (a) climate – mainly temperature and precipitation, …
  • Economic Factors: Market: …
  • Social Factors: Social factors affect farming in a number of ways. …
  • Political Factors:

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Answer

What are the factors that affect the development of Agriculture?

Natural Factors 2. Economic Factors 3. Social Factors 4. Political Factors! Growth and development of agriculture is always directed and determined by physical, economic, social and political factors. In fact, geographical factors play a vital role in agricultural development, in spite of the technological and scientific development.

What determines the pattern of Agriculture in different countries?

The political system, i.e., capitalistic, communist or socialistic system determines the pattern of agriculture. For example in China, agriculture is fully controlled by government; similar was the case of former USSR. On the other hand, in USA, Canada and in most of the other countries of the world, agriculture is a private concern.

What factors affect the yield of a farm?

An important factor in agricultural, yield is water: agriculture accounts for nearly 70 per cent of water consumption. Water scarcity is expected to affect over 1.8 billion people by 2025 according to the World Health Organisation. This could cause not only health problems but also impact farm productivity. Watersheds have been damaged.

What is the relationship between government and agriculture?

For example in China, agriculture is fully controlled by government; similar was the case of former USSR. On the other hand, in USA, Canada and in most of the other countries of the world, agriculture is a private concern. The government policies regarding land, irrigation, marketing and trade, etc., have a direct impact on agriculture.

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What are the factors on which the agriculture Development Depends?

Soil, climate, irrigation, size of landholding, techniques and methods of farming are some factors on which agricultural development depend.


What cause the development of agriculture?

Agricultural communities developed approximately 10,000 years ago when humans began to domesticate plants and animals. By establishing domesticity, families and larger groups were able to build communities and transition from a nomadic hunter-gatherer lifestyle dependent on foraging and hunting for survival.


What are the agricultural development?

Agricultural development is described as the process of creating the circumstances for agricultural potential to be realised. The accumulation of knowledge and the availability of technology, as well as the allocation of inputs and outputs, are among these conditions.


What is the importance of agricultural development?

Agricultural development is one of the most powerful tools to end extreme poverty, boost shared prosperity, and feed a projected 9.7 billion people by 2050. Growth in the agriculture sector is two to four times more effective in raising incomes among the poorest compared to other sectors.


What were the effects of agricultural development?

Agriculture contributes to a number larger of environmental issues that cause environmental degradation including: climate change, deforestation, biodiversity loss, dead zones, genetic engineering, irrigation problems, pollutants, soil degradation, and waste.


What were the effects of the development of agriculture?

The increase in agricultural production and technological advancements during the Agricultural Revolution contributed to unprecedented population growth and new agricultural practices, triggering such phenomena as rural-to-urban migration, development of a coherent and loosely regulated agricultural market, and …


What is agriculture development in India?

The agricultural sector is a central pillar of the Indian economy, employing 60 percent of the nation’s workforce and contributing to about 17 percent of its GDP. Productivity remains a challenge, however, and poverty and malnutrition in rural areas remain high.


What is agricultural development explain with suitable examples?

Agriculture development means providing assistance to the crop producers with the help of various agricultural resources. Providing protection, assisting in the research sphere, employing latest techniques, controlling pests and facilitating diversity all fall within the perview of agriculture development.


What is meant by agricultural development class 8?

Answer: Agricultural development refers to efforts made to increase production in farms so as to meet the ever¬growing demand of the population.


What is the importance of agriculture 5 points?

it is the primary source of food supply in the world. apart from, the fiber that we get for our clothes also come form agriculture. the raw materials for various industries also comes from agriculture. in India, agriculture is the primary occupation for most of the population.


What are the 4 types of agriculture?

There exist four main branches of agriculture, namely;Livestock production.Crop production.agricultural economics.agricultural engineering.


What are the factors that determine the growth of agriculture?

Growth and development of agriculture is always directed and determined by physical, economic, social and political factors . In fact, geographical factors play a vital role in agricultural development, in spite of the technological and scientific development.


How do social factors affect agriculture?

These factors are more effective in tribal cultures. Another way in which social factors can affect agriculture is in the ownership and inheritance of land. In many parts of the world the land of a father is divided between his children.


How does topography affect agriculture?

Topography affects agriculture as it relates to soil erosion, difficulty of tillage and poor transportation facilities. Mechanization of agriculture depends entirely on the topography of land. On rough, hilly lands, the use of agricultural machinery is impossible.


What are some examples of man’s efforts to change the landscape?

For example, man carries water to land where there is little rain, or supplies fertilisers to soil that are deficient in plant food. If necessary, he will adapt his agriculture to conditions that he cannot overcome.


Why is mechanised farming capital intensive?

The occidental farmer has to invest large amount of capital in agriculture because he has to buy agricultural machinery and chemical fertilizers.


How is agriculture controlled?

All forms of agriculture are controlled largely by temperature. Areas deficient in heat are deficient in agriculture. For that is one element of climate that man has not been able to create at economic costs on a large scale.


What is intensive agriculture?

Labour supply determines the character of agriculture. Intensive agriculture is essentially labour-intensive and exemplifies the human pressure on land. Agriculture requires skilled labour that can appreciate the subtle relations of seasons and soils with crops and adopt the requisite cultural practices.


What is the meaning of “agriculture”?

agriculture. Noun. the art and science of cultivating land for growing crops (farming) or raising livestock (ranching). annual plant. Noun. plant with a life cycle of no more than one year, and often much less. barley. Noun. grass cultivated as a grain.


What was the farming revolution?

Taking root around 12,000 years ago, agriculture triggered such a change in society and the way in which people lived that its development has been dubbed the ” Neolithic Revolution.”. Traditional hunter-gatherer lifestyles, followed by humans since their evolution, were swept aside in favor of permanent settlements …


What mutation occurred during the spread of farming into southeastern Europe?

But at some point during the spread of farming into southeastern Europe, a mutation occurred for lactose tolerance that increased in frequency through natural selection thanks to the nourishing benefits of milk.


Where did the wild produce originate?

The wild progenitors of crops including wheat, barley and peas are traced to the Near East region. Cereals were grown in Syria as long as 9,000 years ago, while figs were cultivated even earlier; prehistoric seedless fruits discovered in the Jordan Valley suggest fig trees were being planted some 11,300 years ago. Though the transition from wild harvesting was gradual, the switch from a nomadic to a settled way of life is marked by the appearance of early Neolithic villages with homes equipped with grinding stones for processing grain.


When did rice and millet farming start?

The origins of rice and millet farming date to around 6,000 B.C.E.


Where did goats come from?

Cattle, goats, sheep and pigs all have their origins as farmed animals in the so-called Fertile Crescent, a region covering eastern Turkey, Iraq and southwestern Iran. This region kick-started the Neolithic Revolution. Dates for the domestication of these animals range from between 13,000 to 10,000 years ago.


How does agriculture affect biodiversity?

Agricultural development has historically been a major cause of reduced biodiversity. Agricultural land is created by converting wetlands, forests, prairies, and other landscapes into agricultural production. Typically, diverse plant and animal communities are replaced by much less diverse assemblages of commercially valuable species. Some of those species may have been engineered to combine traits unknown in nature. When a large fraction of the landscape is dominated by artificial communities, species that would otherwise have prospered can be edged out and replaced by ones better adapted to the new circumstances.


What are the causes of the conversion and degradation of the hotspots’ natural landscapes?

Agricultural development is one of the leading causes of the conversion and degradation of the hotspots’ natural landscapes, and Gorenflo and Brandon (2005) examined particularly agricultural suitability (land with high productivity potential) and the likelihood and implications of agricultural expansion affecting the high biodiversity forests of the hotspots.


What are the consequences of the loss of habitat for fish?

However, the loss and degradation of habitat for fish, such as seasonally flooded forests and wetlands, for conversion into rice paddy, may undermine food security if the important contribution of fish and other aquatic animals to local diets and livelihoods continues to be eroded.


How does fragmentation affect diversity?

At first, fragmentation has a positive effect on diversity, because it increases spatial structure along the productivity gradient.


Why do some states restrict the conversion of land to other uses?

In the United States, some states restrict the conversion of land to other uses (e.g., urban development) to limit losses of unusually rich ecological resources , such as wetlands ( National Research Council, 2001 ). The restrictions are coupled with markets where developers can trade ‘credits’ for ecological functions ( Mills, 1980 ).


Why are species valued?

Species are also valued by some people for their mere existence or for viewing, as reflected in the financial contributions to or involvement in preservation causes and the establishment of conservation areas. A variety of economic methods have been used to value the economic benefits of species diversity.


When was the Master Plan for Agricultural Development in Southern Region (MASR) approved?

Master Plan for Agricultural Development in Southern Region (MASR) was prepared by the FAO for 14 of the 19 coastal districts in Bangladesh and was approved by the Bangladesh government in 2012 ( MoA, 2012 ). The plan has aligned with the Sixth Five Year Plan (2011–15) and other government planning documents.


What are the factors that affect agriculture?

Climatic factors such as light, water, and rainfall, temperature, air, relative humidity and wind also affect farming in various ways. Just like other abiotic elements of environmental factors such as soil and topography, they influence how crops grow and develop.


What are the physical factors that affect farming?

Topography, soil, and climate are the major physical factors affecting farming. Topography/Relief – Topography relates to how difficult it is to till the land, soil erosion, and poor transportation networks and facilities. Agriculture can be mechanized depending on the topography of land to be used.


What is farming in the Neolithic period?

Farming is the practice of keeping animals and growing crops for raw materials and food. It is an important aspect of agriculture. Started centuries ago, agriculture is as old mankind, but nobody knows its exact age. Farming in the early century gave rise to the Neolithic Revolution.


Why are farmers encouraged to make sure there is an oversupply of a few types of crops?

It also ensures consumers have access to affordably-priced food products processed from the commodity crops. Farmers are also encouraged to make sure there is an oversupply of a few types of crops. Such crops are required to generate money for growing processed foods despite the prevailing conditions on the market.


What are the main factors that influence the price of commodity crops?

Commodity Prices – Weather, investor speculation and demand for non-food (such as biofuels) and food crops influence the price of main commodity crops such as soy and corn. Commodity crops earn farmers losses or profits based on the prevailing price of output that industrial buyers are willing to pay.


Why is farming so competitive?

The farming environment today is economically complex and competitive. It allows farmers worldwide to choose what to grow from what’s produced globally. On the other hand, governments offer financial incentives to farmers on specific types of crops. Most farmers in America are affected by weather and economic factors.


What temperature do crops need?

Crops require a general temperature range of 0 to 50 degrees Celsius. Different crops have varying optimal or favourable temperature range during the night or day for growth and optimal yields. Temperature rise increases chemical reaction rates and enzyme activity in crops.


What is the contribution of agriculture to the economy of India?

However, the contribution of agriculture to the economy is just 15.87%. The government, at the state and central levels, is continuously taking initiatives by introducing various programs for agricultural and rural development. Cooperatives are chosen as organizations to implement these programs. In the cooperative agriculture sector, there are primary agricultural credit societies, primary cooperative agricultural and rural development banks, processing cooperatives like dairy cooperative, sugar cooperatives, fisheries and so on. The purpose of this chapter is to showcase the functioning of Rajarambapu Patil Sahakari Sakhar Karkhana Ltd, hereafter referred to as RSSK Ltd; which is a unique model where the entire economy revolves around the cooperatives. This chapter attempts to demonstrate that the government and society working together can bring about a social and economic revolution and transform a poor area through agricultural cooperatives. Agricultural cooperatives in India have a long history of 115 years and have witnessed ups and downs in their performance. Most of them carry out a single function, while some have diversified their business activities. Generally, cooperatives carry out their operations after carry out their operations’ singularly and independently. However, we rarely come across cooperatives that have been able to bring the entire local population into the fold of cooperatives.


What is FAO’s role in agriculture?

For over 20 years, FAO has been setting standards in information management in agricultural development and food security. FAO works with Member Nations and other partners to develop and disseminate global standards and procedures for agricultural information management and exchange. Three important initiatives taken by FAO in this regard are [9]:


What are the indigenous curricula?

Indigenous curricula to promote education for production were developed in several countries such as Ghana, Botswana, Cuba, and Vietnam. The EFA report ( UNESCO, 2005) notes that Cuba, one of the few countries with high-quality education, has long laid emphasis on developing the whole individual while linking education with life and work. Its curricular processes promote solidarity and collaborative competition in the form of emulation for self-improvement – among students, teachers, and schools. The colectivo pedagogico, or teachers’ collectives, enhance motivation and ensure participatory development of curricula and materials. “Giving children productive responsibilities, a typical educational feature of pre-literate agrarian societies, is usually lost in western schools, which traditionally deposit all authority and responsibility with teachers and encourage passive attitudes on the part of students” ( Gasperini, 2000: 13). However, Cuba’s residential secondary schools in the countryside, which had participated in the agricultural development plan of each region, with students working a few hours a day on coffee or citrus plantations, have now been subject to the pressure of changing social aspirations.


What is the tendency in economic development circles to jump to policy conclusions without entertaining more fundamental explanations of empirical patterns?

There is a persistent tendency in economic development circles to jump to policy conclusions without entertaining more fundamental explanations of empirical patterns. After reviewing several examples in the field of agricultural development, I provide an alternative paradigm for understanding behavior and organization. Despite the increased sophistication and vast access to data, modern theories and empirical methods have yet to focus adequately on developing fundamental methods for advancing policy analysis through the nature, causes, and consequences paradigm. This assessment points to promising avenues for future research. Two such areas singled out for further attention are black-hole economics and the coevolution of specialization and economic development.


What are the issues raised in criticism of campaigns launched by international organizations, such as the World Bank, among others with the

Two main issues are raised in criticism of campaigns launched by international organizations, such as the World Bank, among others with the aim of STI promotion. The first concerns the need for approaches to delve much deeper into the particularities of the country they are supposed to help rather than adopt one-size-fits-all approaches . The second concerns entry points chosen when launching such campaigns. Thus, several examples may be put forward to illustrate how the choice of a particular institution or ministry resulted in rivalries among concerned national institutions rather than consolidation of their efforts.


What is the most important factor in agriculture?

An important factor in agricultural, yield is water : agriculture accounts for nearly 70 per cent of water consumption. Water scarcity is expected to affect over 1.8 billion people by 2025 according to the World Health Organisation. This could cause not only health problems but also impact farm productivity.


How does agriculture affect Asia?

In most parts of Asia, forest is shrinking, agriculture is gradually expanding to marginal land, and nutrient leaching and soil erosion are accelerating land degradation. 3. Changes in the proportion of non-food crops to food crops could have a significant impact on available cropland for food production.


Why are food crops less yielding?

Due to environmental degradation and loss of ecosystem components, there would be reduced yield of food crops. Unsustainable practices in irrigation and production may lead to increased salinisation of soil, depletion of soil nutrients, and erosion. This, in turn, will cause lower yields.


What are the threats to food production?

Invasive alien species—pests and diseases—are another threat to food production. Pests and pathogens have had particularly severe effects on crop yields in the world’s poorest and most food insecure region of sub-Saharan Africa. Increased climate extremes may encourage the spread of plant diseases, pest outbreaks and weeds. The spread of invasive alien species also occurs in the provisions of humanitarian food aid in times of famine and disaster emergencies, as lower sanitary and phytosanitary standards apply to such food aid.


What is rapid urban development?

Rapid urban development and accompanying development of infrastructure has been primarily at the cost of agricultural land. As settlements, towns and cities grow; adjacent cropland is reduced to accommodate roads, industries and buildings.


How many hectares of food will be needed by 2030?

In order to support the traditional growth in food production, it is projected that an additional 120 million hectares will be required by 2030, mainly in the developing countries.


How much meat will be produced in 2030?

Annual meat production is projected to rise to more than 375 million tonnes by 2030 from about 200 tonnes in 1997-98. Various factors are at work in this increase in demand for livestock products.

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