a new invention the cotton transformed the southern agricultural industry

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The cotton gin revolutionized the agriculture industry in the South, since it completed the work of fifty men, causing cotton production to grow exponentially. These inventions changed the farming community because cotton was produced much more quickly, which resulted in increased profits for the plantation owners.

Why was cotton important to the development of the south?

 · A new invention, the cotton “gin”, transformed the Southern agricultural industry, since this allowed for the seeds and impurities to be removed from the cotton with far greater efficiency. Advertisement Answer 25409 Answer: A new invention, the cotton gin , transformed the Southern agricultural industry.

How did the cotton textile industry change in the 1800s?

The Cotton Boom. While the pace of industrialization picked up in the North in the 1850s, the agricultural economy of the slave South grew, if anything, more entrenched. In the decade before the Civil War cotton prices rose more than 50 percent, to 11.5 cents a pound. Booming cotton prices stimulated new western cultivation and actually checked modest initiatives in economic …

Why was the steam engine used in the cotton industry?

 · Correct answers: 1 question: Anew invention, the cotton , transformed the southern agricultural industry.

Which land-use patterns are associated with cotton-intensive agriculture?

 · c. the cotton gin Slavery was an invention too. It also transformed the southern cotton industry

How did the invention of the cotton gin change the south?

One inadvertent result of the cotton gin’s success, however, was that it helped strengthen slavery in the South. Although the cotton gin made cotton processing less labor-intensive, it helped planters earn greater profits, prompting them to grow larger crops, which in turn required more people.

How did the cotton gin changed agriculture?

The gin improved the separation of the seeds and fibers but the cotton still needed to be picked by hand. The demand for cotton roughly doubled each decade following Whitney’s invention. So cotton became a very profitable crop that also demanded a growing slave-labor force to harvest it.

How did the invention of the cotton gin affect the economy of the south did this technology affect the north as well?

The expansion of cotton helped fuel the growth of an interlinked market economy in the United States, including in the North, because of the subsequent expansion of textile manufacturing and demand for cotton there. However, the cotton gin also helped ensure the survival and growth of slavery in the United States.

What impact did the cotton gin have on other industries?

First, the machine helped to boost productivity and increased cotton usage. Second, the cotton gin helped to increase production of cotton in the United States, and made cotton into a profitable crop. Third, the machine helped to strengthen the United States’ economy and laid the foundations for the slave trade.

Why was cotton so important in the south?

Cotton transformed the United States, making fertile land in the Deep South, from Georgia to Texas, extraordinarily valuable. Growing more cotton meant an increased demand for slaves. Slaves in the Upper South became incredibly more valuable as commodities because of this demand for them in the Deep South.

Which of the following was a result of the invention of the cotton gin?

Which of the following was a result of the invention of the cotton gin? It made cotton a major export item.

How did the invention of the cotton gin impact the South quizlet?

Eli Whitney’s cotton gin changed the south by, triggering vast westward movement, made it so planter grew more cotton, and the cotton exports expanded. Also, Native Americans were driven off southern lands, and slavery continued to be an important source of labor.

What were the advantages of cotton as a crop?

what were four advantages of cotton? easy to grow, cost little to market, harvested cotton could be stored for a long time, and cotton was lighter than other staple crops therefore cost less to transport.

What role did cotton production and slavery play in the South’s economic and social development?

The upshot: As cotton became the backbone of the Southern economy, slavery drove impressive profits. The benefits of cotton produced by enslaved workers extended to industries beyond the South. In the North and Great Britain, cotton mills hummed, while the financial and shipping industries also saw gains.

How did the cotton gin transform life in the North and South?

While it was true that the cotton gin reduced the labor of removing seeds, it did not reduce the need for enslaved labor to grow and pick the cotton. In fact, the opposite occurred. Cotton growing became so profitable for enslavers that it greatly increased their demand for both land and enslaved labor.

How cotton changed the world?

As the cotton industry of the world expanded, with spinning and weaving mills cropping up in fast-industrializing areas, the cotton-growing complex migrated ever further into the American West, to Alabama, Mississippi and eventually Texas, drawing on ever more slave labor.

How did the invention of the cotton gin contribute to the expansion of the plantation system?

With the use of the cotton gin the short stem variety of cotton could be commercially turned into cloth. New plantations were started across the south after the invention of the cotton gin. Plantations were started where plantations were not variable previously.

Is cotton gin agricultural?

Seed cotton [consisting of cotton fiber (lint) attached to cottonseed plus plant foreign matter] is a perishable raw agricultural product that has no value until the fiber and seed are separated by an agricultural process at the cotton gin — which is an agricultural facility.

How did the cotton gin affect agriculture in the south Brainly?

While it was true that the cotton gin reduced the labor of removing seeds, it did not reduce the need for slaves to grow and pick the cotton. In fact, the opposite occurred. Cotton growing became so profitable for the planters that it greatly increased their demand for both land and slave labor.

What were the advantages of cotton as a crop?

what were four advantages of cotton? easy to grow, cost little to market, harvested cotton could be stored for a long time, and cotton was lighter than other staple crops therefore cost less to transport.

What happened as agriculture became entrenched in the south?

As agriculture became entrenched in the South, the South became too dependent on one crop, limiting development.

What was the cotton boom?

The Cotton Boom. While the pace of industrialization picked up in the North in the 1850s, the agricultural economy of the slave South grew, if anything, more entrenched. In the decade before the Civil War cotton prices rose more than 50 percent, to 11.5 cents a pound. Booming cotton prices stimulated new western cultivation …

How many bales of cotton were produced in 1850?

The U.S. cotton crop nearly doubled, from 2.1 million bales in 1850 to 3.8 million bales ten years later.

What were the most important economic units in the South?

Cotton Farms and Plantations. The image of the large cotton plantation dominates popular impressions of the antebellum South and Southern economy, and to be sure it was the preeminent economic unit of the region, but it was hardly the norm. Nearly three-fourths of free families in the South did not own slaves. The typical Southern white was a small farmer. Many of these families grew cotton, which unlike sugar or rice did not require heavy capital to cultivate. The crop was basically nonperishable and survived relatively rough handling, so it tended to survive transportation to distant markets in better shape than other crops. Small farmers often devoted at least part of their acreage to cotton, and small slaveowners could be found working alongside their slaves in the field throughout the region. Still, most slaves lived on — and the bulk of the cotton crop came from — plantations worked by twenty or more slaves. On the largest plantations, fifty or more slaves were divided into gangs, run by drivers and sometimes, though not always, by overseers. On these large plantations, complex divisions of labor evolved. The most developed plantations came to resemble village economies: one Virginia planter in 1854, for example, owned and managed eight plowmen, ten hoe hands, two wagoners, four oxcart drivers, a carnage driver, a hostler, a stable boy, and various craftspeople, including two carpenters, five masons, two smiths, a miller, two shoemakers, five spinners, a weaver, and the owners ’ household staff.

What were the major economic developments in the South during the postwar years?

Postwar Development. In aftermath of the war, the Southern economy began slowly to diversify and commercialize. Agriculturally, land-use patterns grew even more cotton-intensive as new stretches of upcountry shifted from food production, such as corn and pork, to cotton. But the region (like other parts of the nation) also underwent a boom in railroad construction, and enthusiastic boosters and carpetbaggers also started manufacturing enterprises in the 1860s. The rate of manufacturing growth leveled off in the following decade but redoubled in the 1880s and 1890s. These enterprises included cotton mills, commercial fertilizer manufacturing plants (by 1877 South Carolina phosphate mines were shipping more than 100,000 tons to foreign markets), and iron forges. Whereas antebellum Southern ironmakers had relied on outdated and inefficient charcoal-burning operations, their postwar counterparts ran modernized coal mines, coke ovens, and blast furnaces. The town of Birmingham, for example, became an industrial center during this period. Organized in 1871 as part of a land speculation project by the Louisville and Nashville Railroad, the town rapidly developed substantial iron- and eventually steelworks, contributing to a statewide coal output of nearly 200,000 tons in 1877 and pig-iron production of nearly 37,000 tons.

How did slavery affect the South?

As businesses, the plantations channeled economic functions that went well beyond cotton (or sugar or tobacco) cultivation. For example, larger plantation owners either procured or produced on site goods and services that, in the free-labor economy of the Northern states, were produced and exchanged as part of the wider economy. Thus, few towns or villages emerged in the South. Much of the region ’ s commercial exchange operated through the larger plantation owners or through businessmen known as cotton factors, usually agents of Northern or British firms, set up at river landings to market crops and provide planters with imported manufactured goods. The ideology of slaveownership probably inhibited key industrial values , fostering a fiercely defensive agrarianism and a sharp distaste for Yankee commercialism, industry, and wage labor, particularly as proslavery advocacy grew more insistent in the late-antebellum period. More tangibly, slavery cut off the potential immigration of free labor; while strong immigrant flows were feeding into the Northern economy in the 1850s, the South remained a largely closed society. Whether or not slaveowners can be called profit-minded entrepreneurs and capitalists (a question still under debate), the world they made was distinctly preindustrial, even anti-industrial.

What was the antebellum South?

The antebellum South was not all cotton plantations and riverboats. Small-scale industry did emerge in Southern towns such as Lynchburg, Virginia. By 1858 three railroad lines intersected there, and like railroad connections in the Midwest, the industrial infrastructure boosted manufacturing in the town.

What was the ideology of slave ownership?

The ideology of slaveownership probably inhibited key industrial values, fost ering a fiercely defensive agrarianism and a sharp distaste for Yankee commercialism, industry , and wage labor, particularly as proslavery advocacy grew more insistent in the late-antebellum period.

Answers

A new invention, the cotton “gin”, transformed the Southern agricultural industry, since this allowed for the seeds and impurities to be removed from the cotton with far greater efficiency.

Another question on History

Humans during the paleolithic era used fire for each of the following purposes except a. for cooking meat b. for use as a weapon c. for heat and warmth d. for treating animal hides select the best answer from the choices provided

What was the growing use of factory-made agricultural machinery?

The growing use of factory-made agricultural machinery increased farmers’ need for cash and encouraged commercial farming. Developments included:

What were the first agricultural inventions in the 1860s?

1860s–mid-1870s: Steam Tractors. The period from1862 to 1875 signaled a change from hand power to horses, characterizing the first American agricultural revolution. Farm inventions included: 1865–75: Gang plows and sulky plows came into use. 1868: Steam tractors were tried out.

How many acres of corn were planted in 1850?

In 1850, about 75 to 90 labor-hours were required to produce 100 bushels of corn (2 1/2 acres) with walking a plow, harrow, and hand planting. Other agricultural developments included:

How many people could a farmer supply in 1930?

1930: One farmer could supply nearly 10 people in the United States and abroad with food. 1930: Fifteen to 20 labor-hours were required to produce 100 bushels (2 1/2 acres) of corn with a 2-bottom gang plow, 7-foot tandem disk, 4-section harrow, and 2-row planters, cultivators, and pickers.

What were the inventions of the 1830s?

Getty Images. In 1830, about 250 to 300 labor-hours were required to produce 100 bushels (5 acres) of wheat with a walking plow, brush harrow, hand broadcast of seed, sickle, and flail. Inventions included: 1834: The McCormick reaper was patented.

What was the gradual increase in farm production in 1920?

1920–40: The gradual increase in farm production resulted from the expanded use of mechanized power.

Who covered inventions and inventions for ThoughtCo?

American Farm Machinery and Technology Changes from 1776–1990. Mary Bellis covered inventions and inventors for ThoughtCo for 18 years. She is known for her independent films and documentaries, including one about Alexander Graham Bell.

When did cotton become industrialized?

It was only in 1850 that all cotton processes had been fully industrialized. Wool remained a mixed firm longer than cotton.

Why was the process of cotton so slow?

This process was slow because there was a key bottleneck: spinning took a long time, weaving was much faster. A weaver could use a person’s entire weekly spinning output in one day. As demand for cotton rose higher, there was thus an incentive to speed this process up. That incentive would be found in technology: the flying shuttle in 1733, the spinning jenny in 1763, the water frame in 1769 and the power loom in 1785. These machines could operate more effectively if linked together, and sometimes demanded bigger rooms to operate in and more labor than one household could produce to maintain peak production, so new factories emerged: buildings where many people gathered to perform the same operation on a new ‘industrial’ scale.

How did inventions in textile machinery help to increase production?

Inventions: Inventions in textile machinery helped to increase production by overcoming bottlenecks such as spinning, and in turn encouraged further development. Cotton Use: A growth in cotton production encouraged the growth of markets abroad, both for sale and purchase.

What was the dominant fabric in the Industrial Revolution?

View More. The British textile industry involved several fabrics, and before the industrial revolution, the dominant one was wool. However, cotton was a more versatile fabric, and during the Industrial Revolution cotton rose dramatically in importance, leading some historians to argue that the developments spurred by this burgeoning industry — …

Why was weaving so slow?

This process was slow because there was a key bottleneck: spinning took a long time, weaving was much faster. A weaver could use a person’s entire weekly spinning output in one day. As demand for cotton rose higher, there was thus an incentive to speed this process up.

What was the dominant fabric in the 19th century?

The British textile industry involved several fabrics, and before the industrial revolution, the dominant one was wool. However, cotton was a more versatile fabric, and during the Industrial Revolution cotton rose dramatically in importance, leading some historians to argue that the developments spurred by …

How did steam engines help the economy?

In addition to cotton handling inventions, the steam engine allowed these machines to operate in large factories by producing plentiful, cheap energy. The first form of power was the horse, which was expensive to run but easy to set up. From 1750 to 1830 the water wheel became the essential source of power, and the prevalence of fast-flowing streams in Britain allowed demand to keep up. However, demand outstripped what water could still cheaply produce. When James Watt invented the rotary action steam engine in 1781, they could be used to produce a continuous source of power in the factories, and drive many more machines than water could.

What was the cotton industry during the Industrial Revolution?

The United Kingdom experienced a huge growth in the cotton industry during the Industrial Revolution. The factories that were required to produce cotton became a legacy of the time – Sir Richard Arkwright at Cromford built the world’s first true factory to produce cotton. With an ever increasing population and an ever-expanding British Empire, …

What was the importance of the cotton industry?

Of great importance to the cotton industry was the repeal in 1774 of a heavy tax that was charged on cotton thread and cloth made in Britain. Combined with all the above factors were numerous inventions that transformed the British cotton industry and helped to make the UK the ‘workshop of the world’. In 1733, John Kay invented the ‘Flying Shuttle’.

What was the dominant feature of the Pennines?

With an ever increasing population and an ever-expanding British Empire, there was a huge market for cotton and cotton factories became the dominant feature of the Pennines. The north of England had many areas around the Pennines that were perfect for the building of cotton factories.

What was the main source of power for the factories in the Pennines?

The original factories needed a constant power supply and the fast flowing rivers in the Pennines provided this. In later years coal provided this power – this was also found in large quantities in the north of England.

How much was cotton worth in 1770?

In 1770, the cotton was worth around £600,000. By 1805, this had grown to £10,500,000 and by 1870, £38,800,000.

How long did children work in textile factories?

Children under thirteen were not allowed to work for more than nine hours a day and not more than 48 hours in one week. Under eighteens were not allowed to work for more than 12 hours a day and not more than 69 hours in a week. They were also not allowed to work at night. Children employed in a factory between the ages of nine and eleven also had to have two hours of education each day.

Why did the northern cities need a work force?

The factories also needed a work force and the population in the northern cities provided this, especially as many families had been engaged in the domestic system prior to the industrialisation that occurred in the north. There was therefore a ready supply of skilled weavers and spinners.

What was the impact of the invention of cotton gin on the South?

The invention of the cotton gin made the South a one-crop economy and increased the need for slave labor.

Where was cotton grown in the mid 1800s?

a region stretching from South Carolina to east Texas where most U.S. cotton was produced during the mid-1800s.

What led to stricter slave codes in many states?

Slave uprisings led to stricter slave codes in many states.

How did slaves rebel?

Slaves attempted to rebel in many ways, including holding their own religious beliefs, slowing down work, and planning escapes.

How many African Americans were free in 1860?

More than 250,000 free African Americans lived in the South in 1860. About 1 out of every 50 southern blacks was free.

What drew most American women off the farms and out of the home into the new factories and mills?

The growth of a market economy drew most American women off the farms and out of the home into the new factories and mills.

How did the Industrial Revolution benefit workers?

The early industrial revolution greatly benefitted workers by opening up well-paying factory jobs.

When did the overland highway become more effective?

By 1840 , overland highways had proved a more effective form of transportation than canals.

Why did railroads gain quick acceptance?

The railroad gained quick acceptance as a more efficient and flexible alternative to waterbound transportation.

What was the impact of the invention of the cotton gin?

Whitney’s invention made upland short cotton into a profitable crop, which strengthened the economic foundation of slavery in the United States. Despite the social and economic impact of his invention, Whitney lost many profits in legal battles over patent infringement for the cotton gin. Thereafter, he turned his attention into securing contracts with the government in the manufacture of muskets for the newly formed United States Army. He continued making arms and inventing until his death in 1825.

Why was cotton gin important?

It has been argued by some historians that Whitney’s cotton gin was an important if unintended cause of the American Civil War. After Whitney’s invention, the plantation slavery industry was rejuvenated, eventually culminating in the Civil War. The cotton gin transformed Southern agriculture and the national economy.

What were Whitney’s most important innovations?

Career. Whitney is most famous for two innovations which came to have significant impacts on the United States in the mid-19th century: the cotton gin (1793) and his advocacy of interchangeable parts. In the South, the cotton gin revolutionized the way cotton was harvested and reinvigorated slavery.

Where is cotton gin on display?

A cotton gin on display at the Eli Whitney Museum.

How did Whitney calculate the price of a musket?

When the government complained that Whitney’s price per musket compared unfavorably with those produced in government armories, he was able to calculate an actual price per musket by including fixed costs such as insurance and machinery, which the government had not accounted for. He thus made early contributions to both the concepts of cost accounting, and economic efficiency in manufacturing.

What was Whitney’s demonstration of 1801?

Although Whitney’s demonstration of 1801 appeared to show the feasibility of creating interchangeable parts, Merritt Roe Smith concludes that it was “staged” and “duped government authorities” into believing that he had been successful. The charade gained him time and resources toward achieving that goal.

Who invented the milling machine?

Machine tool historian Joseph W. Roe credited Whitney with inventing the first milling machine circa 1818. Subsequent work by other historians (Woodbury; Smith; Muir; Battison [cited by Baida ]) suggests that Whitney was among a group of contemporaries all developing milling machines at about the same time (1814 to 1818), and that the others were more important to the innovation than Whitney was. (The machine that excited Roe may not have been built until 1825, after Whitney’s death.) Therefore, no one person can properly be described as the inventor of the milling machine.

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