Did agriculture start independently in other religions

Did agriculture evolve independently throughout the world?

Evidence suggests agriculture evolved independently throughout the world. Until now, the oldest farming evidence was found in Palestine, Syria and Turkey, dating back to 10,000 BC. However excavations conducted recently at a remote farming village of Ghogha Golan in the foothills of the Zagros Mountains in western Iran at a height of 485 meters,…

What is the history of Agriculture?

The history of agriculture records the domestication of plants and animals and the development and dissemination of techniques for raising them productively.

Did multiple groups of people start agriculture?

In other words, farming was long believed to have been started by one group of ancestral humans. But a new study suggests something different — that multiple groups of people in the Fertile Crescent started agriculture, and these groups were genetically distinct from one another.

How did agriculture begin in the Neolithic Age?

This theory is bolstered by the fact that the dawn of agriculture seems to coincide with humans being able to make the more sophisticated stone objects which define the Neolithic period. A branch of agriculture—called pastoralism—began around the same time as cultivation of plants.


Where did agriculture develop independently?

Agriculture began independently in both North and South America ∼10,000 years before present (YBP), within a few thousand years of the arrival of humans in the Americas. This contrasts with the thousands of years that people were present in the old world before agriculture developed.


Did agriculture develop independently around the world?

Agriculture began independently in different parts of the globe, and included a diverse range of taxa. At least 11 separate regions of the Old and New World were involved as independent centers of origin. Some of the earliest known domestications were of animals.


Did religion or agriculture develop first?

Systematic domestication of pigs, cattle and sheep also took place. In other words, agriculture and animal husbandry followed religion. First, came religion and then came economic, political and agricultural activities.


Who did agriculture start?

Humans invented agriculture between 7,000 and 10,000 years ago, during the Neolithic era, or the New Stone Age. There were eight Neolithic crops: emmer wheat, einkorn wheat, peas, lentils, bitter vetch, hulled barley, chickpeas, and flax. The Neolithic era ended with the development of metal tools.


Why did agriculture begin independently around the world about the same time?

Overall, the climate and environment became better suited to agriculture over time. At the same time, populations were expanding in the Northeast, which likely put at least some pressure on those populations to have more reliable food sources.


What is agriculture and where did agriculture begin?

Sometime around 12,000 years ago, our hunter-gatherer ancestors began trying their hand at farming. First, they grew wild varieties of crops like peas, lentils and barley and herded wild animals like goats and wild oxen.


How was religion related to agriculture?

Throughout the region, the traditional farmers who see farming as a religious act see the crops from their farmlands not as mere material for food but as blessings accruing from God. By performing the traditional religious ceremonies, the ritual priests made a spiritual investment into farming.


How was agriculture started?

The history of agriculture began thousands of years ago. After gathering wild grains beginning at least 105,000 years ago, nascent farmers began to plant them around 11,500 years ago. Pigs, sheep, and cattle were domesticated over 10,000 years ago.


When was agriculture invented?

approximately 10,000 years agoAgricultural communities developed approximately 10,000 years ago when humans began to domesticate plants and animals. By establishing domesticity, families and larger groups were able to build communities and transition from a nomadic hunter-gatherer lifestyle dependent on foraging and hunting for survival.


How did agriculture start in India?

Indian agriculture began by 9000 BCE on north-west India with the early cultivation of plants, and domestication of crops and animals. Indian subcontinent agriculture was the largest producer of wheat and grain. They settled life soon followed with implements and techniques being developed for agriculture.


What are some of the theories regarding the origins of agriculture?

The Oasis Theory (known variously as the Propinquity Theory or Desiccation Theory) is a core concept in archaeology, referring to one of the main hypotheses about the origins of agriculture: that people started to domesticate plants and animals because they were forced to, because of climate change.


Is evolution a gradual process?

Evolution is a gradual process that occurs at varying degrees of gradualness . Some of this gradualness permits us to mark a more or less definite border, but depending on the scale chosen, there is always something that comes before and goes on after any line we may draw. I would expect religion to evolve as societies exceed kin groupings, and that to occur in various ways in various places. But we must always be careful not to mistake our lines for facts, no matter how well accepted they may be, when we are dealing with history.


Was the agricultural revolution a co-evolution?

Zeder makes a distinction between “managed herds” of these animals, and actual domestication, which is useful, and that very vagueness indicates something I think is vital here: the agricultural revolution was not, strictly speaking, a revolution at all. It probably occurred in these areas over several thousand years. It is a co-evolution. So, too, will the social institutions and behaviors be co-evolutionary. As population sizes rise with the introduction of managed herds, in a semi-nomadic lifestyle as herds are taken to seasonal food sources, interactions between non-kin will rise. Where territories are shared, a way to resolve disputes and increase cooperation is needed. Shared rituals are always how humans do this, no matter whether it is football or sacrifice to the gods (if, indeed, there is a difference). So not only is Göbekli-Tepe not a counterexample, it is a necessary outcome of the gradual rise of what we would now think of as agriculture.


When did agriculture begin?

The first agriculture appears to have developed at the closing of the last Pleistocene glacial period, or Ice Age (about 11,700 years ago).


Why do archaeologists study agricultural origins?

Because some resource management practices, such as intensively tending nondomesticated nut-bearing trees, bridge the boundary between foraging and farming, archaeologists investigating agricultural origins generally frame their work in terms of a continuum of subsistence practices.


Which Native American peoples developed complex methods to manage diverse sets of plants and animals?

For instance, Australian Aborigines and many of the Native American peoples of western North America developed complex methods to manage diverse sets of plants and animals, often including (but not limited to) cultivation.


Where do dogs get their meat from?

When considered in terms of food management, dogs may have been initially domesticated as hunting companions, while meat and milk could be obtained more reliably from herds of sheep, goats, reindeer, or cattle than from their wild counterparts or other game animals.


Does agriculture have to be a response to food scarcity?

Notably, agriculture does not appear to have developed in particularly impoverished settings; domestication does not seem to have been a response to food scarcity or deprivation. In fact, quite the opposite appears to be the case.


Where did agriculture originate?

We believe that it emerged independently and spread from places as varied as Mesopotamia, China, South America and sub-Saharan Africa. As we explore more, it is likely that scientists will find more places where agriculture may have emerged even earlier. The birth of agriculture is often referred to as the Neolithic Revolution since it seems to coincide with the Neolithic period—or new stone age. The Neolithic period’s name stems from the fact that stone artifacts were more smooth and refined than those of the Paleolithic period, or old stone age. Many of these tools facilitated early agriculture.


What was the first agriculture?

The first agriculture was likely cultivation of wild species of plants and basic herding of livestock. As time went on, humans became more and more sophisticated at breeding the plants and livestock that best met our needs. The corn you see in the grocery store and the pigs, cows, and sheep you see at a farm did not evolve independently in the wild. They are the product of thousands of years of human selection and breeding from original, wild forms.


What is the name of the branch of agriculture that herds animals?

Pastoralism: a branch of agriculture. A branch of agriculture—called pastoralism—began around the same time as cultivation of plants. Pastoralism is the domestication and herding of animals such as goats, sheep, and cattle.


What is the birth of agriculture called?

The birth of agriculture is often referred to as the Neolithic Revolution since it seems to coincide with the Neolithic period—or new stone age.


Why did preagricultural societies need more energy?

For many of these preagricultural societies, a good bit of their energy went into just getting more energy—in other words, food—to keep going and reproduce. There also couldn’t be too many humans living in one area since there was only so much food to be found or killed .


Why is breeding plants and animals important?

This is because breeding plants and animals has significantly increased the availability of human consumable calories per square kilometer. One way to think about it is that we replaced things that weren’t consumable by humans with things that were.


Why is the Neolithic period called the Neolithic Period?

The Neolithic period’s name stems from the fact that stone artifacts were more smooth and refined than those of the Paleolithic period, or old stone age. Many of these tools facilitated early agriculture.


What has marked indelibly the agricultural sector?

Religion and Christianity have marked indelibly the agricultural sector. Based on a broadly


What is traditional bamenda?

Traditional Bamenda: The Pre-Colonial History and Ethnography of the Bamenda Grassfields.


Is agricultural advancement a scientific study?

for agricultural advancement has hardly been the subject of any scientific study. This paper


Is agriculture a religious act?

Some scholars of religion and development have postulated that agriculture is a religious act. A


Where did agriculture originate?

From its origins in China, agriculture moved south, eventually spreading across the Polynesian islands. In contrast, agriculture passed either slowly or not at all through the tropical and desert climates surrounding early agricultural sites in Egypt, sub-Saharan Africa, Central America, and the Andes.


When did people start farming?

People began farming at different times in different parts of the world. Around 8500 b.c. hunter-gatherers in the area of southwest Asia known as the Fertile Crescent began to cultivate wild grains and domesticate animals. One thousand years later, people in northern and southern China were growing rice and millet and raising pigs.


What were the first crops in the world?

Their first crops were emmer wheat and barley, which were high in protein and easy to domesticate compared to plants native to other parts of the world. Cultivated emmer wheat, for example, is very similar to its wild ancestor, while it took thousands of years for modern corn to evolve from its half-inch-long ancestor.


How did agriculture spread?

From its origins in China, agriculture moved south, eventually spreading across the Polynesian islands. In contrast, agriculture passed either slowly or not at all through the tropical and desert climates surrounding early agricultural sites in Egypt, sub-Saharan Africa, Central America, and the Andes. Domesticated animals did not reach South Africa until around a.d. 200, the same time corn reached the eastern United States. It was therefore the plants, animals, and farm-related technologies of the Fertile Crescent and China that had the greatest impact on future civilizations.


Why did people settle in the fertile crescent?

For the thousands of years before plants and animals were domesticated, people roved in small bands, foraging for enough food to stay alive. Because of the abundance of wild foods in the Fertile Crescent, hunter-gatherers settled there permanently.


What were the first crops that were domesticated in the eastern United States?

The only crops domesticated in the eastern United States were squash and a few seed plants.


Why did animals evolve?

Animals also evolved in response to their new environments, some becoming larger and others smaller. The first domesticated animal was the dog, which was bred for hunting and food in several places around the world.


Where did farming originate?

The idea that farming began in a single population came from initial archaeological discoveries in one part of the Mideast — the Southern Levant , says Melinda Zeder, an archaeologist at the Smithsonian Museum of Natural History, who wasn’t involved in the study.


Where did the Stone Age farmers come from?

Just last month, he published a study that found that late Stone Age farmers from the Turkey region had migrated north into Europe and introduced farming there. So understandably, he had expected to be able to trace European agriculture all the way back to the eastern Fertile Crescent. But that’s not what the DNA said.


Where did the DNA of the ancient people live?

Burger and an international team of scientists analyzed ancient DNA from the remains of four individuals who lived about 10,000 years ago on the eastern edges of the Fertile Crescent — the Zagros Mountains on the border between Iraq and Iran. They compared the DNA of these individuals with that of skeletons that were a couple of thousand years younger and had been found way on the other end of the Fertile Crescent, a region that includes modern-day Turkey.


Where did the Zagros farmers move to?

An unpublished study by a team at Harvard Medical School confirms the genetic closeness of the early Zagros farmers with South Asians, and also shows that the early farmers of the Southern Levant (modern-day Syria and Palestine) moved to Africa, taking their farming traditions south with them. Clearly, the different populations in different parts of the Middle East migrated in different directions.


Where did farmers live?

The earliest farmers lived in the Fertile Crescent, a region in the Middle East including modern-day Iraq, Jordan, Syria, Israel, Palestine, southeastern Turkey and western Iran. And scientists had long assumed these early farmers were a homogenous group that traded and intermingled, swapping farming tools and tricks — as well as their genes. In other words, farming was long believed to have been started by one group of ancestral humans.


Where was the first farm in the world?

The Zagros Mountain range, which lies at the border between Iran and Iraq, was home to some of the world’s earliest farmers. The Zagros Mountain range, which lies at the border between Iran and Iraq, was home to some of the world’s earliest farmers. Sometime around 12,000 years ago, our hunter-gatherer ancestors began trying their hand at farming.


Did farming start in the fertile crescent?

In other words, farming was long believed to have been started by one group of ancestral humans. But a new study suggests something different — that multiple groups of people in the Fertile Crescent started agriculture, and these groups were genetically distinct from one another.


Who Invented Agriculture?

Who first selected wild grains and domesticated them? We know that before the Neolithic era, people sometimes gathered the seeds of wild grains and used them for food. The problem with wild varieties is that their seeds ripen at different times so that they don’t all get broadcast at once. So people (usually women) had to go through fields and shake the ripest pods, which was a time-consuming method. Some genius (probably a woman, see above) started saving seeds from the relatively rare stalks that did all pop at once, and replanted them. It worked, and agriculture was born.


How did agriculture help the Neolithic world?

Remove that limit and population can increase in a geometric progression. And it did with people when agriculture provided a reliable new source of food. But that was only the start. A fertile region could support a much larger population by farming than by hunting and gathering, but in a few generations the population would multiply and something would have to give. When the Neolithic world was still young the most obvious answer when there wasn’t enough land any more was to move on into fresh territory, and of course that happened and explains the rapid expansion of the Neolithic way of life throughout Eurasia and even into the New World. This is how biological evolution works. But in our case there was another dimension to the process, cultural evolution. The uniquely human capacity for intentional thinking enabled our forebears to adapt much more rapidly to new environments and new circumstances. And it enabled the people who stayed behind, when the young folk wandered off in search of new land, to grow and prosper as well.


Where did the Neolithic civilizations start?

The combination of naturally occurring grains, and animals that were relatively easy to domesticate, was more favorable there than anywhere else in the inhabited world. Farther east, other Neolithic settlements appeared a millennium or two later, starting in the Indus Basin and in central China. Each of these regions also harbored a combination of easily domesticated plants and animals that was almost as favorable as the first Garden of Eden in Iraq. 1 The trigger that started it all was climate change. Around 10,000 BC the weather changed dramatically for the better, so much so that we mark that period as the beginning of a new geological era, the Holocene. The planet warmed up, rainfall patterns settled down, and so did our ancestors. There’s still some debate whether the new way of life evolved independently in each of the three areas or whether it spread from the first one. History and prehistory are studded with examples of cultural diffusion. However, the archeological evidence supports the idea that the three areas developed agriculture independently. For one thing, the suite of grains and animals that were first domesticated is rather different in each of the three areas. 2 Once established, the new way of life spread rapidly. Some of the expansion involved absorption of resident hunter gatherer populations as the agriculturists took over their lands, but another common outcome was simple displacement, pushing the older populations back into less desirable turf. Our own takeover of North America from the existing Native American peoples was essentially a re-enactment of a drama that had been going on in many parts of the world for a dozen millennia. In virtually all cases, the odds were heavily tilted in favor of the agriculturalists, because there were generally a lot more of them when push came to shove.


What is cultural evolution?

Cultural evolution began earlier, with the emergence of human intelligence (or intentionality), but was developing at a more stately tempo until agriculture and the domestication of animals came along and changed almost everything.

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