Did britain have dense agriculture

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British farming is on the whole intensive and highly mechanised. This approach is well-suited to the current distribution infrastructure, but can be less productive by area than smaller scale, diversified farming. The UK produces only 59% of the food it consumes.

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What is the agriculture like in the UK?

In the south-west of England, the rich grass is ideal for feeding dairy cows. In the south-east of England and the lowlands of Scotland, grain, potatoes and sugar beet are grown. In the east of England (East Anglia), wheat, barley and vegetables grow in enormous fields. Types of Farming:

How has Britain’s agriculture changed over the years?

Farming used to employ a great many people in Britain but nowadays, with machinery, a few people can run a huge farm of thousands of hectares. Agriculture provides around 60 per cent of Britain’s food needs even though it employs just 1.4 per cent of the country’s labour force. Britain’s agriculture is under pressure to change at the moment.

What was the Great Depression of Britain’s agriculture?

THE GREAT DEPRESSION OF BRITISH AGRICULTURE. Crimson hillsides of sainfoin fed stables of horse power and sustained fertility in the soils. Estates supported huge communities with labourers who worked the land.

How much money is made from farming in the UK?

Total income from farming in the United Kingdom was £5.38 billion in 2014, representing about 0.7% of the British national value added in that year. This is a fall of 4.4% in real terms since 2014.

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Which type of agriculture was introduced by British?

The chief factor was the colonial subjugation of India under the British rule. India was reduced to the supplier of raw materials and food grains to Britain and importer of British manufactured goods. Many commercial crops like, cotton, jute, tea, tobacco were introduced to meet the demand in Britain.


Is Britain an agricultural country?

Agriculture in the United Kingdom uses 69% of the country’s land area, employs 1.5% of its workforce (476,000 people) and contributes 0.6% of its gross value added (£9.9 billion). The UK produces less than 60% of the food it consumes.


Was England good for farming?

Agriculture in England is today intensive, highly mechanised, and efficient by European standards, producing about 60% of food needs with only 2% of the labour force. It contributes around 2% of GDP. Around two thirds of production is devoted to livestock, one third to arable crops.


How did agriculture change in England?

For many years the agricultural revolution in England was thought to have occurred because of three major changes: the selective breeding of livestock; the removal of common property rights to land; and new systems of cropping, involving turnips and clover.


When did farming start in Britain?

The culture of farming arrived in Britain some 6,000 years ago, marking the beginning of the Neolithic period (New Stone Age).


Is Britain self sufficient in food?

The UK is not self-sufficient in food production; it imports 48% of the total food consumed and the proportion is rising. Therefore, as a food-trading nation, the UK relies on both imports and a thriving agricultural sector to feed itself and drive economic growth.


What did the British do to the farmers?

The farmers had to bear the cost of indigo farming and the British planters used to keep the yields without compensating the farmers. Not only this, they were even exploited through the various taxes levied on them. Thousands of landless labourers and poor farmers were forced to sow indigo instead of other crops.


How did the British exploit the farmers?

They forced the farmers to grow indigo in half of their land and and they have to give the grown indigo as tax. Due to this most of the farmers suicide and when farmers tried to explain the British that some farm lands are not suitable for cultivation of indigo they threatened to kill them.


What percentage of Britain is farmland?

Farmland covers around 70% of the UK. Our wildlife cannot survive in the remaining 30% alone. Wildlife-friendly farming needs to become mainstream.


How did the British achieve an increase in agricultural productivity?

How did Britain achieve this agricultural productivity? process of enclosure, whereby landlords would reclaim and privatize fields that for centuries had been held in common by multiple tenants. This increased agricultural productivity, but it also impoverished many tenant farmers, many of whom lost their livelihoods.


Why did the agricultural revolution happen in Britain?

The British Agricultural Revolution was the result of the complex interaction of social, economic and farming technological changes. Major developments and innovations include: Norfolk four-course crop rotation: Fodder crops, particularly turnips and clover, replaced leaving the land fallow.


How does life in Britain change as agriculture is developed in the Neolithic period?

The Neolithic period in the British Isles was characterised by the adoption of agriculture and sedentary living. To make room for the new farmland, these early agricultural communities undertook mass deforestation across the islands, dramatically and permanently transforming the landscape.


What were the most important innovations of the British Agricultural Revolution?

One of the most important innovations of the British Agricultural Revolution was the development of the Norfolk four-course rotation, which greatly increased crop and livestock yields by improving soil fertility and reducing fallow.


What was the agricultural revolution?

The British Agricultural Revolution, or Second Agricultural Revolution, was an unprecedented increase in agricultural production in Britain arising from increases in labour and land productivity between the mid-17th and late 19th centuries. Agricultural output grew faster than the population over the century to 1770, and thereafter productivity remained among the highest in the world. This increase in the food supply contributed to the rapid growth of population in England and Wales, from 5.5 million in 1700 to over 9 million by 1801, though domestic production gave way increasingly to food imports in the nineteenth century as the population more than tripled to over 35 million. Using 1700 as a base year (=100), agricultural output per agricultural worker in Britain steadily increased from about 50 in 1500, to around 65 in 1550, to 90 in 1600, to over 100 by 1650, to over 150 by 1750, rapidly increasing to over 250 by 1850. The rise in productivity accelerated the decline of the agricultural share of the labour force, adding to the urban workforce on which industrialization depended: the Agricultural Revolution has therefore been cited as a cause of the Industrial Revolution .


What was the role of maize in the development of agriculture?

While not as vital as the potato, maize also contributed to the boost of Western European agricultural productivity.


What was the result of the complex interaction of social, economic and farming technological changes?

The British Agricultural Revolution was the result of the complex interaction of social, economic and farming technological changes. Major developments and innovations include:


How many people were in Great Britain in 1851?

Great Britain contained about 10.8 million people in 1801, 20.7 million in 1851 and 37.1 million by 1901. This corresponds to an annual population growth rate of 1.3% in 1801-1851 and 1.2% in 1851–1901, twice the rate of agricultural output growth. In addition to land for cultivation there was also a demand for pasture land to support more livestock. The growth of arable acreage slowed from the 1830s and went into reverse from the 1870s in the face of cheaper grain imports, and wheat acreage nearly halved from 1870 to 1900.


What was the cause of the Industrial Revolution?

The rise in productivity accelerated the decline of the agricultural share of the labour force, adding to the urban workforce on which industrialization depended: the Agricultural Revolution has therefore been cited as a cause of the Industrial Revolution .


How did maize contribute to the development of agriculture?

While not as vital as the potato, maize also contributed to the boost of Western European agricultural productivity. Maize also had far higher per-acre productivity than wheat (about two and a half times), grew at widely differing altitudes and in a variety of soils (though warmer climates were preferred), and unlike wheat it could be harvested in successive years from the same plot of land. It was often grown alongside potatoes, as maize plants required wide spacing. Maize was cultivated in Spain since 1525 and Italy since 1530, contributing to their growing populations in the early modern era as it became a dietary staple in the 17th century (in Italy it was often made into Polenta ). It spread from northern Italy into Germany and beyond, becoming an important staple in the Habsburg monarchy (especially Hungary and Austria) by the late 17th century. Its spread started in southern France in 1565, and by the start of the 18th century, it was the main food source of central and southern French peasants (it was more popular as animal fodder in the north).


What made the British agricultural revolution more efficient?

While advances in transport engineering made overseas markets closer and more competitive, the revolution in certain farm practices, equipment and innovation made floundering British agriculture more efficient. Interest in seed breeding and fertiliser additives was stimulated and in livestock, the period saw the birth of a flurry of breed books and societies, established to focus on improvements to genetics and the value of animals.


What was the Great Depression of British agriculture?

The Great Depression of British Agriculture: a history. What was a golden age for fieldsports was a depressing time for British farming , although all those unproductive acres might inadvertently have resulted in maximising sporting potential. The highly successful horsedrawn mower from Bamford, the “Royal” No 5.


What happened to farm labourers in the 19th century?

By the end of the 19th century, farm labourers were driven from agriculture into any other employment available, often in the towns. Only the most tenacious farmers succeeded, however, and during the First World War a large amount of skills, muscle and horses were lost to the front line.


What made the most of fresh produce’s inability to be transported any great distance?

Of the more viable agricultural enterprises, market gardening and milk production made the most of fresh produce’s inability to be transported any great distance. For horticulture, soil fertility was well served by the abundant supplies of stable manure that could be obtained from the ever-growing industrial towns.


Why were beef and sheep so poor in the 19th century?

Even beef and sheep were struggling due to imports, with overseas markets able to feed stock at lower cost than our domestic producers. The late 19th century was a difficult time for the wealthy and landed gentry who could no longer boast about their vast acres of productive agriculture.


What did the Crimson Hillsides of Sainfoin feed?

Crimson hillsides of sainfoin fed stables of horse power and sustained fertility in the soils. Estates supported huge communities with labourers who worked the land. In the early and mid 19th century rural landowners were the wealthiest class in the wealthiest nation, growing nearly 10 million acres of cereals.


How much of Britain’s food is grown in agriculture?

Agriculture provides around 60 per cent of Britain’s food needs even though it employs just 1.4 per cent of the country’s labour force. Britain’s agriculture is under pressure to change at the moment. Farmers are under pressure to adopt more environmentally friendly methods such as organic farming.


How has farming changed in Britain?

Farming used to employ a great many people in Britain but nowadays, with machinery, a few people can run a huge farm of thousands of hectares .


What is farming in the UK?

What is farming? It is the growing of crops and the rearing of animals. Farming in Britain. Farming contributed £5.6 billion to the UK economy in 2006. The total area of agricultural land in 2006 was 18.7 million hectares, about 77 per cent of the total land area in the United Kingdom (excluding inland water).


What is the fourth largest producer of cereals and oilseeds in the EU?

arable (growing of crops and cereals) The UK is the fourth largest producer of cereal and oilseed crops in the EU (after France, Germany and Poland) accounting for about 8% of total EU production. pastora l (rearing and production of animals including pigs, chickens, hill farming sheep, beef and dairy cattle)


Why do different types of farming occur in different regions of Britain?

This is due to the influence of relief, climate (especially precipitation and temperature), soil type and to an extent closeness to the market.


What are the main crops grown in the UK?

Principal crops: wheat, (the most widely grown arable crop in the UK) barley, oats, potatoes,


Where do sheep live in England?

Some parts of Britain have excellent soil for crops, while others are used for cattle, sheep, pigs and poultry. In the north-west of England, Wales and Scotland, farmers keep cattle and sheep. Sheep can survive the cold winters on the hills and moors.


How did the English produce more food?

Exactly how those working on the land were able to produce more food remains something of a mystery. More animal power was available to English farmers than to their counterparts elsewhere, and from the 1820s and 30s a wide variety of machinery was developed, which was particularly important for improving the efficiency of the cutting and threshing of grain. The improvement in labour productivity, however, had begun long before this.


Why did the output of agriculture grow?

One reason output grew was through new farming systems involving the rotation of turnips and clover, although these were part of the general intensification of agricultural production, with more food being produced from the same area of land.


What were the major changes in the agricultural revolution?

For many years the agricultural revolution in England was thought to have occurred because of three major changes: the selective breeding of livestock; the removal of common property rights to land; and new systems of cropping, involving turnips and clover. All this was thought to have been due to a group of heroic individuals, who, according to one account, are ‘a band of men whose names are, or ought to be, household words with English farmers: Jethro Tull, Lord Townshend, Arthur Young, Bakewell, Coke of Holkham and the Collings.’


How did farmers conserve nitrogen?

Available nitrogen was conserved by feeding bullocks in stalls, collecting their manure (which is rich in nitrogen), and placing it where it was needed. Also, most importantly, new nitrogen was added to the soil using legumes – a class of plants that have bacteria attached to their roots, which convert atmospheric nitrogen into nitrates in the soil that can be used by whatever plants are grown there in the following few years.


What crops were replaced by pasture?

A sheaf-delivery reaper at work © The mix of crops also changed, replacing low-yielding types, such as rye, with higher-yielding types such as wheat or barley. The balance between arable and permanent pasture also changed, so that more productive arable land was replacing permanent pasture. This does not mean that fodder supplies were falling, quite the reverse, for the loss of permanent pasture was made good by new fodder crops, especially turnips and clover, in arable rotations. Not only did these crops result in an increase in fodder yields, but they were also instrumental in the reclamation of many lowland heaths from rough pasture to productive arable farms.


Why was the new system of farming so successful?

This new system of farming was remarkable because it was sustainable; the output of food was increased dramatically , without endangering the long-term viability of English agriculture . But just as a sustainable agriculture had been achieved, the development of chemical fertilisers and other external inputs undermined this sustainability. An essentially organic agriculture was gradually replaced by a farming system that depended on energy-intensive inputs dependent on the exploitation of fossil fuels.


When were turnips first used as animal fodder?

One of the earliest pieces of evidence we have, concerning the cultivation of turnips for animal fodder, is the inventory taken for probate purposes, in 1638, of the possessions of a Mr Pope, of Burgh Castle in Suffolk.


Why is the EU still tied to food standards?

In practice, it will remain tied to EU food standards because of the overriding importance of trade with the bloc. It should not restrict its freedom any more than that. To insist that imports meet domestic standards ignores the fact that other countries have different climates and pests, so need different tools.


How have tariffs affected farmers?

Tariffs have raised the price of food. Some farmers have benefited from subsidies. But others have not, because the subsidies are capitalised into land values, raising the cost of getting into farming.


Why should local authorities not be central government?

Because different parts of the country would benefit from different things (more hedgerows in East Anglia, better stone walls in the Yorkshire Dales) local authorities, not central government, should set the priorities and distribute some of the money. It would be better still if reverse auctions were used.


When did New Zealand stop subsidies?

And subsidies are a crutch for indifferent farmers. After New Zealand did away with its subsidies in the 1980s, some farms went bust. Fewer than had been feared, though—and the survivors became technologically sophisticated and export-oriented.


Is Britain like New Zealand?

Britain is not quite like New Zealand, for reasons that go to the heart of Britons’ odd relationship with the countryside. In New Zealand, and also in America, people distinguish between farming and nature. Farmland is something that you might travel through in order to get somewhere pretty. Britons expect their agricultural land to be beautiful.


What are the consequences of a smaller crop?

The impact is two-fold. A smaller crop means higher prices. Inevitably there will be an even bigger shortfall from within the UK than usual and so retailers will have to look abroad. The problem for the mass retailers is that, with the rise of new food markets such as China, Brazil and India, there is also much more demand for the food produced internationally.


How many acres are there in Yew Tree Farm?

She and her husband, John, have the tenancy of Yew Tree farm, a National Trust property once occupied by Beatrix Potter and which even featured in Miss Potter, the film starring Renée Zellweger. Although there are 700 acres, more than 250 of them are the stunning crags and fells of the Lake District National Park.


How many sheep does Lake District have?

It is land suited only to livestock, which was why it appealed to the couple when they came here 10 years ago. They have around 90 Galloways and a few hundred head of Herdwick sheep, the stout-legged Lake District breed. “We decided to try to take out all the input costs by swapping to Galloways which can forage for their own food.” Likewise, they chose the Herdwicks even though they don’t breed until they are three years old and generally have only one lamb (rather than breeding at one year and having two lambs as with more standard breeds).


Why did the Prince of Wales start the Prince’s Countryside Fund?

In 2010 he had founded the Prince’s Countryside Fund (PCF), to support people working in agriculture, using money gathered from corporate donors. “One of the reasons the prince wanted to establish the charity was to create an emergency fund,” says Tor Harris, director of the PCF. At that meeting the entire £150,000 emergency fund was earmarked for distribution to farmers in crisis. It was matched by another £150,000 from the Duke of Westminster, one of Britain’s biggest landowners. Donations from corporate partners, including Waitrose, Asda, HSBC and even McDonald’s, brought the emergency fund to around half a million pounds, which is being distributed by four charities.


Do supermarkets dictate prices?

The British supermarket buyers have been used to dictating prices. They now have fierce global competition and increasingly they will find that prices will be dictated back to them. They will have to pass that cost on to the consumer.


Is food price rising inevitable?

Food price rises are inevitable. At the heart of the problem is the way the British supermarkets work and how they interact with a global food market.


Is farming in the UK in a crisis?

British farming is in the midst of a very deep crisis. After a drought in its first months, 2012 went on to become England’s wettest year on record, and the second wettest in the UK as a whole. Early summer was a deluge. High summer was sunless, resulting in silage that was as much as 40% lower in all-important sugars. The rains came again for the heart of the growing season. “This crisis compares to both BSE and foot and mouth,” says the farmer and agriculture expert, Donald Curry, who chaired the government inquiry into food and farming after the foot-and-mouth outbreak in 2001, and who now sits in the Lords as a crossbench peer. “The weather has affected the entire country and some have had the double whammy of bovine TB and Schmallenberg in sheep.” There are also price pressures on both inputs – feed and fuel – and the amount retailers are prepared to pay. “We know it’s going to affect farmers for this year and next year. For the farming help charities this has become a very serious issue.”


Why was Britain not as forested as the continent?

Not entirely covered, no. 4,000 years ago Britain was probably 60% forested, but that was without the effects of large-scale human habitation , and even then it was just a bit over half of land area.


Why do people dislike England?

They dislike because they lost many historical wars against England. Like Spanish Armada, Napoleon in France etc. England basically prevented them becoming great powers in the world. Even though these are in the history, they still haunt in the minds of pepole. So, they wish to see England loose or get hurt.


How many people lived in England in 100BC?

There were 1,5 million living in England 100BC and the same amount by the Norman Invasion 1150 years later, so there were never more than 2 million people in all this time, due to harsh Iron Age climate and bad crops.


How much of England is woodland?

In total therefore (and guessing a bit) about 75 – 80% of England would have been woodland. If you include Scotland and Wales the figure will drop to nearer 60% because of mountain exposure and rainfall.


What percentage of woodland was in the Roman period?

Sticking to England, woodland cover was probably down to about 15% in the Roman period, but often confined to a few extensive woodlands with other areas of the country less wooded than today. Woodland area went up in the ‘Dark Ages’ and then fell until a low of 5 – 8% in the late nineteenth century.


Why was corn harvested green?

The corn was often harvested green and kiln-dried, because the climate was much wetter. One of the Edwards [Edward 1st, I think] ordered all the forrest to be cut back a bow-shot from every road in England [fewer roads but a hell of a task!].


Did afforestation begin in England?

The afforestation of England did commence as the ice sheets receded from the last glacial maximum and the usual progress from pioneer species to the fullest cover possible.


What was England’s forest like?

England had always been a paradise for trees , covered from the end of the last ice age in increasingly dense forests of oak, hazel and birch, with some pine. When early islanders began farming, the tree cover slowly began to give way to pasture and cultivated land, but under Anglo-Saxon kings, the forests still belonged to …


How much of England’s forest is afforested?

In the years since, a steady programme of afforestation has increased England’s forest cover back to 13% – not far off the levels of 1,000 years ago. To put that in context, many other European countries average about 37% coverage, so England still has one of the continent’s lowest levels. But the commitment to afforestation is clear, with modern English foresters using a wide variety of native broadleaf, conifers and species that could thrive in our changing climate.


How old is the lime tree in England?

Standing humbly amid all the wonderful specimens of the National Arboretum at Westonbirt is one of England’s oldest trees: a small-leaved lime that may be up to 2,000 years old. The tree was coppiced down to its stumps last November; then artist Richard Harris was commissioned to create a sculpture in its honour, using hundreds of its cut stems.


Where is the oldest oak tree in England?

England’s oldest oak is not in a forest but on a grassy meadow, near the town of Bourne in southern Lincolnshire. Thought to be more than 1,000 years old, it has a hollow trunk of about 12 metres, the inside of which was once used as a tearoom with door and roof built in.


How tall is the Old Man of Kent?

The tree stands a mighty 51 metres tall. Topics. England holidays. England’s forests.


Past Events

Information on the Agriculture in the United Kingdom annual seminars are available from the national archive, listed under ‘Events’.


Previous editions of Agriculture in the United Kingdom

Amendments and addition of link to Agriculture in the United Kingdom 2020.

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