How did cultural diffusion influence the agricultural revolution

The rise of agriculture and the influence of genetics and culture (gene–culture coevolution) continue to affect modern humans through alterations in nutrition, predisposition to obesity, and exposure to new diseases.

Explanation. As one culture developed the use of crop growing as a sustainable substitute to hunting and gathering, this was introduced to other cultures when they migrated from one place to another. This new method of growing your own food either replaced or supplimented the current methods.

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Answer

How did the Agricultural Revolution change agriculture?

The Agricultural Revolution got its start in Great Britain in the early 18th century and spread throughout Europe and America by the 19th century. This was a period of significant agricultural development marked by new farming techniques and inventions that led to a massive increase in food production.

What caused the agricultural revolution in the Near East?

In the Near East, for example, it’s thought that climatic changes at the end of the last ice age brought seasonal conditions that favored annual plants like wild cereals. Elsewhere, such as in East Asia, increased pressure on natural food resources may have forced people to find homegrown solutions.

What is the significance of Agriculture in human evolution?

The development of agriculture marks a major turning point in human history and evolution. In several independent domestication centers, cultivation of plants and animals flourished according to the particular environmental conditions of the region, whereas human migration and trade propelled the global spread of agriculture.

How did new farming techniques improve the productivity of farmers?

These new farming techniques gave soil time to replenish nutrients leading to stronger crops and better agricultural output. Advancements in irrigation and drainage further increased productivity. It was also during this time that inventions were created that greatly increased efficiency.


How did the Agricultural Revolution affect culture?

The agricultural revolution had a variety of consequences for humans. It has been linked to everything from societal inequality—a result of humans’ increased dependence on the land and fears of scarcity—to a decline in nutrition and a rise in infectious diseases contracted from domesticated animals.


How did the first Agricultural Revolution diffuse?

About 12,000 years ago, people living in Southwest Asia began to grow crops and raise animals intentionally. From there, agriculture diffused throughout the world. Since 1750, mechanization, the use of chemicals, and research have increased agricultural productivity, allowing more people to work off the farm.


What is the diffusion of agriculture?

Diffusion embraces the spread of new practices and ideas in both a social and a geographical sense. Social diffusion refers to the spread of an innovation from its originating sources (in the case of new farm practices usually agricultural scientists) among a group of potential users.


What inspired the Agricultural Revolution?

The first was caused by humans changing from being hunter-gatherers to farmers and herders. The second was caused by improvements to livestock breeding, farming equipment, and crop rotation. The third was caused by plant breeding and new techniques in irrigation, fertilization, and pesticides.


Where did the first agricultural revolution began and diffuse to?

The “Neolithic Revolution” is another name for the First Agricultural Revolution, which began in the Fertile Crescent of the near Middle East, and then gradually spread outwards into Europe and North Africa.


What was the major change caused by the agricultural revolution?

The Agricultural Revolution of the 18th century paved the way for the Industrial Revolution in Britain. New farming techniques and improved livestock breeding led to amplified food production. This allowed a spike in population and increased health. The new farming techniques also led to an enclosure movement.


Where did agriculture diffuse from?

The earliest farmers lived in the Fertile Crescent, a region in the Middle East including modern-day Iraq, Jordan, Syria, Israel, Palestine, southeastern Turkey and western Iran.


How did agriculture spread?

The Spread of Farming Modern genetic techniques suggest that agriculture was largely spread by the slow migration of farmers themselves. It also seems clear that in some times and places, such as in northern South Asia, it was spread by the passing on of agricultural techniques to hunter-gatherers.


What is diffusion process in agricultural extension?

Specifically, the adoption-diffusion model was originally developed to explain the educational processes that led agriculture producers to accept new idea. Rogers (1995) defines diffusion as, “the processes by which an innovation is communicated through certain channels over time among members of a social system.


What were the cultural social and economic effects of the Agricultural Revolution?

The increase in agricultural production and technological advancements during the Agricultural Revolution contributed to unprecedented population growth and new agricultural practices, triggering such phenomena as rural-to-urban migration, development of a coherent and loosely regulated agricultural market, and …


What are the 3 main agricultural revolutions?

Key Takeaways: Agriculture, Food Production, and Rural Land UseThere were three agricultural revolutions that changed history. … There are two primary methods of farming in the world. … Von Thunen’s model of agricultural land use focuses on transportation.More items…•


How did improved transportation affect farming?

Complete answer: Improved transport benefited the agricultural industry because farmers living in rural areas could use transportation such as the railroad to ship their produce to the market. In order to deliver farm resources and harvested crops as quickly as possible, properly managed transport is efficient.


How did the agricultural revolution affect the human population?

The agricultural revolution in developing countries has produced large resident human populations with the potential for direct person-to-person spread of infection and greater environmental contamination by feces.


What was the agricultural revolution?

The agricultural revolution is the name given to a number of cultural transformations that initially allowed humans to change from a hunting and gathering subsistence to one of agriculture and animal domestications. Today, more than 80% of human worldwide diet is produced from less than a dozen crop species many of which were domesticated many years ago. Scientists study ancient remains, bone artifacts, and DNA to explore the past and present impact of plant and animal domestication and to make sense of the motivations behind early cultivation techniques. Archeological evidence illustrates that starting in the Holocene epoch approximately 12 thousand years ago (kya), the domestication of plants and animals developed in separate global locations most likely triggered by climate change and local population increases. This transition from hunting and gathering to agriculture occurred very slowly as humans selected crops for cultivation, animals for domestication, then continued to select plants and animals for desirable traits. The development of agriculture marks a major turning point in human history and evolution. In several independent domestication centers, cultivation of plants and animals flourished according to the particular environmental conditions of the region, whereas human migration and trade propelled the global spread of agriculture. This change in subsistence provided surplus plant food that accumulated during the summer and fall for storage and winter consumption, as well as domesticated animals that could be used for meat and dairy products throughout the year. Because these new survival strategies no longer required relocation and migration in search of food, humans were able to establish homesteads, towns, and communities, which, in turn, caused rapid increases in population densities and lead to the emergence of civilizations. This dependence on plant and animal domestication entailed a number of other environmental adaptations including deforestation, irrigation, and the allocation of land for specific crop cultivation. It also triggered various other innovations including new tool technologies, commerce, architecture, an intensified division of labor, defined socioeconomic roles, property ownership, and tiered political systems. This shift in subsistence mode provided a relatively safer existence and in general more leisure time for analytical and creative pursuits resulting in complex language development, and the accelerated evolution of art, religion, and science. However, increases in population density also correlated with the increased prevalence of diseases, interpersonal conflicts, and extreme social stratification. The rise of agriculture and the influence of genetics and culture (gene–culture coevolution) continue to affect modern humans through alterations in nutrition, predisposition to obesity, and exposure to new diseases. This chapter will cover the various regions that adopted early agricultural practices and look at the long-term positive and negative effects of agriculture on society.


What are the effects of urbanization?

Rapid urbanization, especially in the tropics, is often associated with increased poverty, poor housing and unsanitary conditions. The result is that people may be living in a more fecally polluted environment than in rural areas, encouraging such diseases as amebiasis and giardiasis.


What was the transition from hunting and gathering to agriculture?

This transition from hunting and gathering to agriculture occurred very slowly as humans selected crops for cultivation, animals for domestication, then continued to select plants and animals for desirable traits. The development of agriculture marks a major turning point in human history and evolution.


How does agriculture affect humans?

The rise of agriculture and the influence of genetics and culture (gene–culture coevolution) continue to affect modern humans through alterations in nutrition, predisposition to obesity, and exposure to new diseases.


Why did humans establish homesteads?

Because these new survival strategies no longer required relocation and migration in search of food, humans were able to establish homesteads, towns, and communities, which, in turn, caused rapid increases in population densities and lead to the emergence of civilizations.


How did infectious diseases start?

The era of infectious diseases began after the agricultural revolution took place , a time when the community began to increase in size and live close to animals by farming and herding. The age of chronic diseases following the Industrial Revolution can be said to have been caused by increased caloric intake and by the growing number of factors detrimental to human health, such as smoking, exposure to chemicals, and stress, in the wake of the drastic change in humanity’s lifestyle. Accordingly, we can say that the pattern of disease is basically determined by the circumstances of the time. The changes that have already started in the contemporary age are increase of the human lifespan, along with a decrease in the fertility rate, an increase in the elderly population, and the weakening of binding power of the family. This shift will change not only the man-man relationship but also the man-machine relationship, thereby evolving into a relationship that is totally different from the past.


How did the agricultural revolution affect the environment?

One way the Agricultural Revolution impacted the environment was by transforming previously undisturbed land into farmland, which destroyed habitats for wildlife and decreased biodiversity. Biodiversity is the variety of life forms found within an ecosystem.


What was the agricultural revolution?

The Agricultural Revolution brought about experimentation with new crops and new methods of crop rotation. These new farming techniques gave soil time to replenish nutrients leading to stronger crops and better agricultural output. Advancements in irrigation and drainage further increased productivity.


What are the effects of plowing and irrigation?

Extensive plowing, along with an increased use of pesticides, fertilizers and irrigation led to increased soil erosion, degraded soil quality and increased pollutant runoff into waterways. When pesticides and fertilizers are washed into local waterways, it promotes the growth of algae.


How did agricultural inventions affect society?

These agricultural changes created a ripple effect that spread throughout society, with one of the more notable results being a rapid increase in population.


What was the invention of the plow?

The Agricultural Revolution saw the invention of the plow, which is a device that contains blades that effectively break up the soil. Plows created cuts within the soil for the sowing of seeds.


What was the farming revolution?

Taking root around 12,000 years ago, agriculture triggered such a change in society and the way in which people lived that its development has been dubbed the ” Neolithic Revolution.”. Traditional hunter-gatherer lifestyles, followed by humans since their evolution, were swept aside in favor of permanent settlements …


What mutation occurred during the spread of farming into southeastern Europe?

But at some point during the spread of farming into southeastern Europe, a mutation occurred for lactose tolerance that increased in frequency through natural selection thanks to the nourishing benefits of milk.


What is the meaning of “agriculture”?

agriculture. Noun. the art and science of cultivating land for growing crops (farming) or raising livestock (ranching). annual plant. Noun. plant with a life cycle of no more than one year, and often much less. barley. Noun. grass cultivated as a grain.


Where did the wild produce originate?

The wild progenitors of crops including wheat, barley and peas are traced to the Near East region. Cereals were grown in Syria as long as 9,000 years ago, while figs were cultivated even earlier; prehistoric seedless fruits discovered in the Jordan Valley suggest fig trees were being planted some 11,300 years ago. Though the transition from wild harvesting was gradual, the switch from a nomadic to a settled way of life is marked by the appearance of early Neolithic villages with homes equipped with grinding stones for processing grain.


When did rice and millet farming start?

The origins of rice and millet farming date to around 6,000 B.C.E.


When was rice first grown?

The origins of rice and millet farming date to around 6,000 B.C.E. The world’s oldest known rice paddy fields, discovered in eastern China in 2007, reveal evidence of ancient cultivation techniques such as flood and fire control.


What were the effects of the ice age on the Near East?

In the Near East, for example, it’s thought that climatic changes at the end of the last ice age brought seasonal conditions that favored annual plants like wild cereals. Elsewhere, such as in East Asia, increased pressure on natural food resources may have forced people to find homegrown solutions.

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