How did the grain elevator change agriculture

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Grain elevators emerged in the second half of the nineteenth century in North America when agriculture shifted from a subsistence-based to a cash-market economy as wheat farmers of the Great Plains states and provinces began mass, long-distance distribution of their produce. All grain elevators consist of several components.

The invention of grain elevators greatly helped grain farmers be able to produce and move more grain in less time. And during the building boom of the railroad system, grain elevators adapted and were built along the railroad tracks.

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Answer


What impact did the grain elevator have on society?

As they spread, grain elevators changed basic marketing methods, introducing standardized grading and futures contracts, and exposed grain producers to the power of large firms with exclusive control of “line” elevators at rural shipping points and warehouses at terminal markets.


What did the grain elevator do?

These conveyors lift or elevate grain from ground level up to the top of the bins—thus the name elevator. In a nutshell, elevators function to transfer grain from the farmer’s truck to the bin, store it, blend it if necessary and then transfer it to a railcar for delivery.


What is the grain elevator in agriculture?

grain elevator, storage building for grain, usually a tall frame, metal, or concrete structure with a compartmented interior; also, the device for loading grain into a building. Early elevators were powered by animals; modern facilities use internal-combustion engines or electric motors.


How do farmers use grain elevators?

The truck carrying the grain pulls into the local grain elevator and then stops on the scale at the elevator to be weighed. The operator takes a sample of the grain to test for the weight, moisture content and to check for any foreign materials present.


How did the grain elevator make life easier?

The invention of grain elevators greatly helped grain farmers be able to produce and move more grain in less time. And during the building boom of the railroad system, grain elevators adapted and were built along the railroad tracks.


Is the grain elevator still used today?

In the past few decades, however, an increasing number of grain elevators have been abandoned in cities. New shipping routes have allowed grain transport to bypass urban areas, and more than 9,400 silos are now idle throughout the United States, according to the Department of Agriculture.


When were grain elevator invented?

1842The first grain elevator operated by steam to transfer and store grain for commercial purposes was designed by Robert Dunbar and made by Jewett and Root for Joseph Dart, Buffalo, NY, in 1842.


Who invented grain elevator?

Robert DunbarJoseph DartGrain elevator/Inventors


How did the 2nd agricultural revolution impact the industrial revolution?

Second Agricultural Revolution: Coinciding with the Industrial Revolution, the Second Agricultural Revolution used the increased technology from the Industrial Revolution as a means to increase farm productivity through mechanization. This caused exponential population increase.


Why is it called grain elevator?

The name grain elevator comes from the method that is used to get the grain to the top. When a truck pulls onto the scale it is weighed, from there the grain gets dumped into the elevator.


How does a grain elevator make money?

The basis, as well as transaction, handling and dryer fees, are the main ways that the elevator makes money – rather than through changes in the futures price. In fact, if you sell corn to an elevator and the price of grain rallies, they have to pay interest on the money to fund their short futures position.


What is a grain elevator business?

What Are Grain Elevators? Grain elevators are waypoints for the staples we eat — moving from the farm to food producers like feedlots or food companies. They’re usually located in rural areas to be accessible to farmers, and near highways, railways or waterways to make it easy to transport the grain to food producers.


When was the first grain elevator invented?

The first steam-powered grain elevator was invented and constructed in 1843 , in Buffalo, NY. Joseph Dart, Jr. is credited as the first person to adapt an earlier grain elevator design for commercial use, and Robert Dunbar constructed it.


What was grain stored in before elevators?

Before grain elevators, grain was stored in bags or bins. Grain elevators make it possible to store grains in bulk. A grain elevator is a building in which grain is stockpiled and stored, but the phrase can also refer to a tower in which an elevator scoops up the grain and deposits it into a storage facility.


What are grain elevators made of?

While early grain elevators were made of wood, and therefore prone to fire, modern ones are made of steel and concrete. Over the years, their simple technology and utility have been responsible for helping store food for millions.


When was the Buffalo grain elevator built?

One wooden grain elevator in Buffalo was erected in 1895, and then completely burned down four years later, resulting in untold financial damage. After experiencing many more devastating fires (including anti-monopoly protest arson in Nebraska), the trend turned toward steel and concrete. This had the added bonus of making …


Which city has the largest grain elevator?

2019 and beyond. Today, Buffalo remains not only the birthplace of the modern grain elevator, but it is also the American city with the single largest number of existing grain elevators.


Who invented the grain elevator?

Dart’s Elevator was a major innovation. It was invented by Joseph Dart, a merchant, and Robert Dunbar, an engineer, in 1842 and 1843, in Buffalo, New York.


What is grain elevator?

A grain elevator is an agrarian facility complex designed to stockpile or store grain. In the grain trade, the term “grain elevator” also describes a tower containing a bucket elevator or a pneumatic conveyor, which scoops up grain from a lower level and deposits it in a silo or other storage facility. In most cases, grain elevator also describes …


What is the name of the elevator at Lake and Rail?

Lake & Rail Grain Elevator, part of the “elevator alley” – The Lake and Rail produces over 2,700,00 pounds of flour a day. Marine A grain elevator, also part of the “elevator alley” and across from the Lake & Rail Grain Elevator. The Standard Elevator – named after the Standard Milling Company and built in 1926.


What are some examples of grain explosions?

A historical example of the destructive power of grain explosions is the 1878 explosion of the Washburn “A” Mill in Minneapolis, Minnesota, which killed 18, leveled two nearby mills, damaged many others, and caused a destructive fire that gutted much of the nearby milling district. (The Washburn “A” mill was later rebuilt and continued to be used until 1965.) Another example occurred in 1998, when the DeBruce grain elevator in Wichita, Kansas, exploded and killed seven people. A recent example is an explosion on October 29, 2011 at the Bartlett Grain Company in Atchison, Kansas. The death toll was six people. Two more men received severe burns, but the remaining four were not hurt.


What is an elevator row?

In Canada, the term “elevator row” refers to a row of four or more wood-crib prairie grain elevators. In the early pioneer days of Western Canada ‘s prairie towns, when a good farming spot was settled, many people wanted to make money by building their own grain elevators.


When was the Wheeler elevator built?

The Standard Elevator – named after the Standard Milling Company and built in 1926. Wheeler Elevator – also known as the Agway/GLF East Work House, built in 1908. Wollenberg Grain and Seed Elevator – wooden “country style” elevator formerly located in Buffalo, New York; destroyed by fire in October 2006.


Where are the modern grain elevators located?

A number of the city’s historic elevators are clustered along “Elevator Alley”, a narrow stretch of the Buffalo River immediately adjacent to the harbor.


Where was the first grain elevator built?

Despite the CPR’s demand for standard elevators, there was considerable variation in profile, height and storage capacity of the earliest elevators, especially in Manitoba. William Hespeler, in Niverville, Manitoba, constructed the first grain elevator, a wooden, silo-like building, in 1879.


How many elevators were there in 1933?

Numbering as many as 5,758 in 1933, elevators have dominated the prairie landscape for more than a century with every hamlet, village and town boasting its row of them, a declaration of a community’s economic viability and a region’s agricultural strength. Southern Alberta (photo by Richard Harrington).


How high was the elevator in the 1920s?

By the 1920s, most companies were building the standard, or traditional, 30,000 to 40 000-bushel elevator with a gable roof and a gable-roofed cupola. Elevators were typically 24 m high or higher. No other building dominated the skyline as did the elevator. Grain Elevator, Camrose.


What are the elements of an elevator?

All elevators, despite variations in shape and bushel capacity, shared three architectural elements: the elevator, the driveway and the office/engine room. Grain companies drew up building plans, but often contracted out the construction. Building the framed cupola and driveway once elevator is completed.


What is a twin elevator?

Another permanent type of annex was the twin elevator, an older, smaller elevator that was moved alongside a newer, larger elevator. Many older elevators escaped demolition by being twinned in this way. The balloon annex, which appeared in the 1920s, was designed as a temporary facility.


Will grain elevators disappear?

Bleak though the prognosis might be for the survival of the traditional grain elevator, not all elevators will disappear. Prior to the 1990s a number were sold to producers for personal storage. Companies re-adapted others to bulk fertilizer storage. Today, heritage groups seek to preserve elevators.


Why are grain elevators called elevators?

They are called elevators because the unloaded grain is conveyed with augers or bucket elevators into the top of the storage bins and discharged by gravity. There are many different types of grain elevators. The most widely distributed throughout the globe are the flat bins and silos built from concrete or steel.


What are the conveyors in a corn combine?

Combines have many conveyors, including grain pan augers ; clean- grain elevator to the grain bin (clean-grain conveyor and bubble-up); tailings elevator to the thresher; and dischargers for threshed material residues, usually by a beater onto straw and chaff spreaders, or straw chopper/spreader (where fitted); and the grain bin unloading system. Auger unloaders can add 0.5% to grain damage in corn. For the least kernel damage, especially in food-grade corn and popcorn harvesting, crop-processing components and auger flights often are ground down to remove sharp edges; unloader slow-down kits are an option.


What was the first stage of grain elevators?

The first stage in grain elevator architecture was the vernacular iron-clad wood type. Constructed by local farmers and carpenters without a standardized plan or blueprint, the structures emphasized function over form. There are two subtypes based on framing.


What is the difference between grain elevators and wood elevators?

First, wood elevators remain more numerous in the Canadian provinces, although this is expected to change as they are replaced by the concrete version. Second, the exterior of Canadian wood elevators is usually …


What is flour mill elevator?

Flour mill elevators also feature specialized equipment concerned with testing and cleaning raw grain such as laboratories, dampers, washers, and driers. The feed mill elevator normally handles, in addition to wheat, a variety of grains, including corn, oats, and soybeans.


What color are grain elevators?

Colors vary according to company ownership; however, red, silver, white, and brown are the most common. Whether wood, tile, or concrete, the grain elevator continues to dominate the visual landscape of the Great Plains, where it has played a significant role in the economic life of small towns for more than 100 years.


How thick are elevator walls?

The walls, six to eight inches thick, are reinforced with vertical and horizontal steel rods (I beams). Grain elevators can be classified into four types based on function. The first and most numerous is the country, or local, elevator sited along railroad tracks in the small towns of the Great Plains.


What was the primary hub for grain storage and shipping industry?

From the beginning of commercial agriculture in the Great Plains, the iron-clad wood elevator was the primary hub for the grain storage and shipping industry. Railroads often provided land (right-of-way) for its construction as well as grain cars suited for transporting locally produced grain to distant markets.


Why is the turning over process important in a flour mill elevator?

The turning-over process is important in a flour mill elevator in order to retain wellconditioned wheat during prolonged periods of storage. Therefore, flour mill elevators require a complex network of vertical and horizontal conveyors to withdraw wheat from any bin and send it to another.


How does a grain elevator work?

How Does it Work: Grain Elevators. Farmers plant corn in their field in late April and May and in the fall corn is harvested by a grain combine. Once the corn is harvested (usually in September, October, or November) it is dried and stored on a farm or in a grain elevator and from there is shipped to mills and refineries. …


Why are grain elevators important?

Grain elevators were created to hold crops being purchased or available for resale, and to help with the problem of storing grain. The essential function of storage is to protect the grain from the elements and allow for it to be stored and tracked for quality and temperature.


What is gravity used for?

Gravity is usually used to load grains from bins to the loading station. The process of loading and a reversal of the process for unloading. The empty truck pulls onto the scales and is weighed. The truck will pull under the spout and the grain will load back into the truck.


How tall is the grain elevator?

It is easy to recognize the grain elevator. It is sometimes the tallest building in town, between 70 to 120 feet tall! The truck carrying the grain pulls into the local grain elevator and then stops on the scale at the elevator to be weighed.


Why is it important to keep crops clean?

If the crop is left in the field it can have reduced return on investment due to insects, mold and birds or rodents. Crops must be clean. The moisture content is a major factor for storing safely. High moisture can lead to mold and fungus. As grains reach maturity the moisture content diminishes.


What happens if the price of grain goes up?

The downside is if prices go up, the farmer is already locked into the forward contract. If the farmer does choose to store the grain and sell later, he can sell to ethanol plants, bio-diesel plants or to livestock feed producers. The farmer will negotiate prices and will choose to sell throughout the year.


What happens if grain is too wet?

If the grain is too wet farmers have to pay to have it dried at the elevator. Either one of these scenarios will lower the cost per bushel. The grain is then dumped from the truck to a work floor of the elevator.

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Overview

A grain elevator is a facility designed to stockpile or store grain. In the grain trade, the term “grain elevator” also describes a tower containing a bucket elevator or a pneumatic conveyor, which scoops up grain from a lower level and deposits it in a silo or other storage facility.
In most cases, the term “grain elevator” also describes the entire elevator com…


Usage and definitions

In Australian English, the term “grain elevator” is reserved for elevator towers, while a receival and storage building or complex is distinguished by the formal term “receival point” or as a “wheat bin” or “silo”. Large-scale grain receival, storage, and logistics operations are known in Australia as bulk handling.
In Canada, the term “grain elevator” is used to refer to a place where farmers sell grain into the gl…


History

Both necessity and the prospect of making money gave birth to the steam-powered grain elevator in Buffalo, New York, in 1843. Due to the completion of the Erie Canal in 1825, Buffalo enjoyed a unique position in American geography. It stood at the intersection of two great all-water routes; one extended from New York Harbor, up the Hudson River to Albany, and beyond it, the Port of Buffalo; the other comprised the Great Lakes, which could theoretically take boaters in any direct…


Elevator Alley

The city of Buffalo is not only the birthplace of the modern grain elevator, but also has the world’s largest number of extant examples. A number of the city’s historic elevators are clustered along “Elevator Alley”, a narrow stretch of the Buffalo River immediately adjacent to the harbor. The alley runs under Ohio Street and along Childs Street in the city’s First Ward neighborhood.


Elevator row

In Canada, the term “elevator row” refers to a row of four or more wood-crib prairie grain elevators.
In the early pioneer days of Western Canada’s prairie towns, when a good farming spot was settled, many people wanted to make money by building their own grain elevators. This brought in droves of private grain companies. Towns boasted dozens of elevator companies, which all stood in a row along the railway tracks. If a town were lucky enough to have two railways, it was to be …


Elevator companies

• ABB Grain was founded as a mutual company, the Australian Barley Board, in 1939, by barley growers in South Australia and Victoria; after demutualization, it was acquired by Viterra (see below) in 2009; Australian Bulk Alliance, a joint venture between ABB and Sumitomo, operates facilities in some areas.
• CBH Group, a co-operative company, was established by grain growers in Western Australia, in 1933.


Notable grain elevators

During the Battle of Stalingrad, one particularly well-defended Soviet strongpoint was known simply as “the Grain Elevator” and was strategically important to both sides.
This is a list of grain elevators that are either in the process of becoming heritage sites or museums, or have been preserved for future generations.
• Acadia Valley – Prairie Elevator Museum, former Alberta Wheat Pool converted into a tea house a…


Elevator explosions

Given a large enough suspension of combustible flour or grain dust in the air, a significant explosion can occur. A historical example of the destructive power of grain explosions is the 1878 explosion of the Washburn “A” Mill in Minneapolis, Minnesota, which killed 18, leveled two nearby mills, damaged many others, and caused a destructive fire that gutted much of the nearby milling district. (The Washburn “A” mill was later rebuilt and continued to be used until 1965.) Another e…


Background


Building A Traditional Elevator


What Goes on Inside An Elevator


Types of Elevators


Site Development


New Designs


Contemporary Issues

  • Once rising above the horizon every 12 to 16 kilometres the grain elevator is fast disappearing. As early as the 1930s, falling farm incomes led to rural depopulation. In the 1950s, rising expectations, improved roads and mechanized farm equipment accelerated this trend. Although the rail network and the primary elevator system remained stable, few…

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