How does agriculture affect the atmosphere

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Agriculture contributes to global climate change by releasing carbon dioxide (CO 2), methane (CH 4), and nitrous oxide (N 2 O), the three gases presently causing the most greenhouse warming.

Agriculture contributes to climate change

At every stage, food provisioning releases greenhouse gases into the atmosphere. Farming in particular releases significant amounts of methane and nitrous oxide, two powerful greenhouse gases.Jun 30, 2015

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Answer

How does farming affect the environment?

The industrial model of farming crops in the US also contributes to air emissions. Soil plowing or tilling releases carbon into the atmosphere, as does burning fossil fuels to power farm machinery. Fugitive pesticide emissions can harm farm workers and impact nearby fields.

How does the climatic change affect agriculture?

In the long run, the climatic change could affect agriculture in several ways: rural space, through the loss and gain of cultivated lands, land speculation, land renunciation, and hydraulic amenities.

What happens to crops in high temperatures?

Many staple crops are extremely sensitive to heat and when temperatures rise over 36 °C, soybean seedlings are killed and corn pollen loses its vitality. Scientists project that an annual increase of 1 °C will decrease wheat, rice and corn yields by 10%.

What are the factors that affect agricultural productivity?

For example, projected increases in temperatures, changes in precipitation patterns, changes in extreme weather events, and reductions in water availability may all result in reduced agricultural productivity.

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How does agriculture affect the environment?

Agriculture contributes to a number larger of environmental issues that cause environmental degradation including: climate change, deforestation, biodiversity loss, dead zones, genetic engineering, irrigation problems, pollutants, soil degradation, and waste.


How does the agricultural industry contribute to atmospheric pollution?

Agricultural air pollution comes mainly in the form of ammonia, which enters the air as a gas from heavily fertilized fields and livestock waste.


Does agriculture affect climate?

Agriculture is a major part of the climate problem. It currently generates 19–29% of total greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Without action, that percentage could rise substantially as other sectors reduce their emissions. Additionally, 1/3 of food produced globally is either lost or wasted.


How does agricultural activities destroy the environment?

Such farming practices, by and large, depleted and degraded soil, reduced biodiversity (e.g., disappearance of crop diversification) and produced water and air pollution, degrading the environment and posing a health threat to farmworkers and consumers.


How agriculture affects global warming?

Modern agriculture, food production and distribution are major contributors of greenhouse gases: Agriculture is directly responsible for 14 per cent of total greenhouse gas emissions, and broader rural land use decisions have an even larger impact.


How much does agriculture contribute to greenhouse gases?

11%Emissions and Trends In 2020, greenhouse gas emissions from the agriculture economic sector accounted for 11% of total U.S. greenhouse gas emissions. Greenhouse gas emissions from agriculture have increased by 6% since 1990.


How does farming create greenhouse gases?

Agriculture is both a victim of and a contributor to climate change. On the one hand, agricultural activities contribute approximately 30 per cent of total greenhouse gas emissions, mainly due to the use of chemical fertilizers, pesticides and animal wastes.


How do CAFOs affect the environment?

CAFOs also contribute to greenhouse gas emissions, adding to the problem of climate change. Resulting agriculture pollution like air emissions and odors can harm the health of people working on a farm and in the surrounding communities, as well as the farm animals themselves.


What happens when you have a lot of hydrogen sulfide?

On a spectrum in-between, concentrations of hydrogen sulfide can cause headaches, nausea, eye irritation and dizziness. Hydrogen sulfide is produced anaerobically by bacteria breaking down sulfur-containing material. The sulfur can originate from sources aside from manure, including animal feed, gypsum bedding and waste milk.


How does farming affect air quality?

Industrial farming operations reduce air quality in varying ways and also contribute to greenhouse gases. Each farm’s operations and management play some role in controlling emissions, and each farm (depending on its type) has different pollutants of concern.


What are the aerosols from animal waste?

The combination of ammonia from animal waste and fertilizer application with pollutants from combustion can create aerosols, which are a collection of potentially harmful particulate matter suspended in the air that can damage human health. 10 Studies have found that farms are a major source of fine-particulate precursors that form the aerosols that can then lead to heart or pulmonary disease. Particulate matter can be traced to dried manure, bedding materials, animal dander and poultry feathers. These particulates can cause or contribute to several respiratory diseases. 11


Why do farmers use pesticides?

Farmers use pesticides on crops like corn and soybeans on over 90 percent of US fields, in order to control weeds, fungi, insects and other pests. 18 When pesticides are aerially applied, farm workers can be exposed to the chemicals, some of which have harmful effects on humans.


How does farming affect the atmosphere?

The industrial model of farming crops in the US also contributes to air emissions. Soil plowing or tilling releases carbon into the atmosphere, as does burning fossil fuels to power farm machinery. Fugitive pesticide emissions can harm farm workers and impact nearby fields. Air emissions associated with large-scale animal waste application can …


Why are farm workers vulnerable to air pollution?

Farm workers are particularly vulnerable to air emissions on the farm due to direct and prolonged exposure. They also are tasked with being in the vicinity of concentrated forms of chemicals that can be dangerous or even deadly at high doses. Some of these effects include:


How much carbon dioxide does organic farming remove from the air?

We’ve said it before and we’ll say it again: Organic agriculture can remove from the air and sequester 7,000 pounds of carbon dioxide per acre per year. The Rodale Institute study that found that staggering number also found that, when properly executed, organic agriculture does not compromise yield.


What are the effects of land use changes on agriculture?

In almost every case, land use changes — say, deforestation, or paving over green space for suburban expansion — result in more surface warming.


Does drought increase yield?

As a matter of fact, in drought years, it increases yield, since the additional carbon stored in soil helps it to hold more water. In wet years, the additional organic matter in the soil wicks water away from plant roots, limiting erosion and keeping plants in place.


What is intensification of agriculture?

Intensification of agriculture is a driver of changes in the seasonal characteristics of the global carbon cycle. Each year in the Northern Hemisphere, levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide drop in the summer as plants inhale, and then climb again as they exhale and decompose after their growing season. Over the past five decades, the size of this …


Does corn produce carbon dioxide?

Crop production may generate up to a quarter of the increase in the seasonal cycle of atmospheric carbon dioxide, with corn playing a leading role, according to a new study published in the journal Nature.


What is methane produced by bacteria?

Methane generated by bacteria in ruminant animals is emitted as flatulence. Continued anaerobic digestion of animal manure after it has left the animal produces both CH 4 and N 2 O (mostly methane). In the United States, 25% of direct agricultural emissions consist of methane from enteric fermentation.


What happens when rice is flooded?

When fields are flooded, anaerobic conditions develop and the organic matter in the soil decomposes, releasing CH 4 to the atmosphere, primarily through the rice plants.


What did humans do for the first time?

For most of the human race’s existence, it did not practice agriculture. For many hundreds of thousands of years, humans and their near-human ancestors practiced various forms of hunting and gathering, finding edible plants and animals in the environment rather than raising them. The first known tools, made about 2.5 million years ago, were food processors, chipped stones devised to help butcher antelopes and horses in the part of Africa that is now Ethiopia. Cropping and livestock-raising began in the Middle East about 9500 BC and gradually spread to most peoples of the world, though there are still a few communities that live primarily through hunting and gathering.


Does Encyclopedia have page numbers?

Most online reference entries and articles do not have page numbers. Therefore, that information is unavailable for most Encyclopedia.com content. However, the date of retrieval is often important. Refer to each style’s convention regarding the best way to format page numbers and retrieval dates.


How many animals are raised for meat and dairy every year?

Billions of animals are raised for meat and dairy every year around the world, meaning more land is cleared, more crops are grown, more fertilizer is applied, more manure is produced, and more GHGs are released into the atmosphere.


What percentage of agricultural emissions are from animals?

In the U.S., around 40 percent of all agricultural emissions stem from animal agriculture, and two-thirds of that comes from ruminants animals, mostly cows. The increasing demand for meat and dairy means an increase in the number of cattle raised, land and other resources used, and emissions released into the atmosphere.


How much urine does a dairy cow produce?

Mission Blue. A mature dairy cow produces around 14 gallons (120lb) of feces and urine each day. Since there are around 264 million dairy cows in the world, that means 3.7 billion gallons of excrement can be produced in a single day.


What gases are released into the atmosphere and trap heat from the sun?

Gases such as carbon dioxide, nitrous oxide, methane, and chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) are released into the atmosphere and trap heat from the sun – thus warming the planet. These gases are called “greenhouse gases” (GHG) since they build up a layer in the atmosphere that’s more reflective than would be normal, analogous to how a gardener’s …


What happens when a hurricane rolls through?

When storms roll through, like Hurricane Florence, floodwaters wash this waste into rivers, streams, and lakes resulting in extremely unsanitary conditions. Nitrogen, phosphorus, and ammonia from animal waste can lead to dead zones in our oceans caused by algal blooms which deplete oxygen and choke out marine life.


How many people died from starvation in the Goldilocks industry?

Almost one million people died of starvation and an additional million were forced to leave their homeland as refugees. Agriculture, including raising animals for food, is referred to as “The Goldilocks Industry” attributed to its sensitivity to extreme weather shifts and decreased yields as a result.


What percentage of freshwater is used for farming?

Less than 1 percent of freshwater on this planet is usable by humans, and an unsettling 70 percent of that is used for growing food and raising farm animals. OneGreenPlanet.org. Animal agriculture is a leading contributor to the world’s water depletion and freshwater contamination from farm runoff.


What are the potential changes in veterinary practices?

Potential changes in veterinary practices, including an increase in the use of parasiticides and other animal health treatments, are likely to be adopted to maintain livestock health in response to climate-induced changes in pests, parasites, and microbes.


What are the challenges of droughts?

Changes in the frequency and severity of droughts and floods could pose challenges for farmers and ranchers and threaten food safety. [3] . Meanwhile, warmer water temperatures are likely to cause the habitat ranges of many fish and shellfish species to shift, which could disrupt ecosystems. Overall, climate change could make it more difficult …


How does heat affect livestock?

Drought may threaten pasture and feed supplies. Drought reduces the amount of quality forage available to grazing livestock.


How does drought affect pasture?

[1] More extreme temperature and precipitation can prevent crops from growing. Extreme events, especially floods and droughts, can harm crops and reduce yields.


How does acidification affect the ocean?

Carbon dioxide is absorbed by oceans, resulting in ocean acidification. Acidification reduces the size and abundance of shellfish, which in turn leads to decreased harvest and eventually to changes in prices for consumers. Source: US EPA (2015). Climate Change in the United States: Benefits of Global Action.


What are the stresses that fisheries face?

Many fisheries already face multiple stresses, including overfishing and water pollution. Climate change may worsen these stresses. In particular, temperature changes could lead to significant impacts. This map shows the annual centers of biomass for three species in the northeastern United States from 1968 to 2015.


Does temperature affect crops?

For any particular crop, the effect of increased temperature will depend on the crop’s optimal temperature for growth and reproduction. [1] . In some areas, warming may benefit the types of crops that are typically planted there, or allow farmers to shift to crops that are currently grown in warmer areas.


What are the gases that are absorbed by the Earth’s atmosphere?

Greenhouse gases are defined as the gaseous compounds in the Earth’s atmosphere (such as carbon dioxide) that absorb infrared radiation, trap heat and contribute to the greenhouse effect (which refers to the warming of the Earth’s surface and atmosphere).


How does livestock contribute to the environment?

Livestock contribute to emissions via enteric fermentation, which means they produce CH 4 as part of their normal food digestion processes. An additional contribution from livestock is linked to manure management , which contributes to both CH 4 and N 2 O emissions.


What are the new weather phenomena?

New weather phenomena like melting glaciers, more intense storms, more frequent forest fires, and the rising of global sea levels all reflect our changing climate. Many news stories and scientific articles have reported on the importance of monitoring the concentration of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere (mainly carbon dioxide (CO 2 )) …


Why are open meadows important?

Open meadow habitats, which fall under this category, and native wildflowers are important for many pollinators like some birds and bees. Without farmland, succession may need to be deliberately set back by management activities, such as prescribed burning, to help early successional species survive.


How does rotational grazing affect biodiversity?

Through grazing for a limited time period in one area, biodiversity of native plants increases because grasses have time to regrow equally without one species taking over and becoming invasive.


What are some examples of agricultural systems?

For example, open meadow habitats are important for species like waterfowl, amphibians and for pollinators. Some species even increase in number due to agricultural activities.


What is conservation reserve program?

The program is aimed at protecting native species and conserving soils by taking the land out of agricultural production.


Why do grasslands exist?

Grasslands provide habitat to a great number of animals and native plants. These areas have been almost entirely wiped out in other countries of Europe due to modern development or intensive agriculture. In Romania, however, they still exist because of the traditional (low-impact) way of farming and seasonal grazing of livestock by shepherds.


What is the most dominant land use on the planet?

As time passed, agriculture became the most dominant land use on the planet, feeding a booming population and transforming natural habitats of many species. Whether the outcome of this change delivers negative or positive consequences depends largely on our approach. You may think it sounds counter-intuitive, but sustainable management …


Why is irrigation needed during dry spells?

The higher the water content in the soil, the less irrigation is needed during dry spells to preserve crops, which saves significant amounts of water over the long term. In certain forms of agriculture, properly processed sewage, wastewater, and sludge can be used on the landscape instead of disposing it as waste.


How does farming affect the environment?

Large scale farming can cause large amounts of soil erosion, causing between 25 and 40 percent of soil to reach water sources , with it carrying the pesticides and fertilizers used by farmers, thus polluting bodies of water further . The trend to constantly bigger farms has been highest in United States and Europe, due to financial arrangements, contract farming. Bigger farms tend to favour monocultures, overuse water resources, accelerate the deforestation and a decline in soil quality. A study from 2020 by the International Land Coalition, together with Oxfam and World Inequality Lab found that 1% of the land owners manage 70% of the world’s farmland. The highest discrepance can be found in Latin America: The poorest 50% own just 1% of the land. Small landowners, as individuals or families, tend to be more cautious in land use. The proportion of small landowners however, is increasingly decreasing since the 1980ties. Currently, the largest share of smallholdings can be found in Asia and Africa.


How does CO2 affect plants?

It limits the vaporization of water reaching the stem of the plant. “Crassulacean Acid Metabolism” oxygen is all along the layer of the leaves for each plant leaves taking in CO 2 and release O 2. The growth response is greatest in C 3 plants, C 4 plants, are also enhanced but to a lesser extent, and CAM Plants are the least enhanced species. The stoma in these “CAM plant” stores remain shut all day to reduce exposure. rapidly rising levels of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere affect plants’ absorption of nitrogen, which is the nutrient that restricts crop growth in most terrestrial ecosystems. Today’s concentration of 400 ppm plants are relatively starved for nutrition. The optimum level of CO2 for plant growth is about 5 times higher. Increased mass of CO2 increases photosynthesis, this CO2 potentially stunts the growth of the plant. It limit’s the reduction that crops lose through transpiration .


What is CSA in agriculture?

Climate-smart agriculture (CSA) is an integrated approach to managing landscapes to help adapt agricultural methods, livestock and crops to the ongoing human-induced climate change and, where possible, counteract it by reducing greenhouse gas emissions, at the same time taking into account the growing world population to ensure food security. Thus, the emphasis is not simply on sustainable agriculture, but also on increasing agricultural productivity. “CSA … is in line with FAO ’s vision for Sustainable Food and Agriculture and supports FAO’s goal to make agriculture, forestry and fisheries more productive and more sustainable”.


What are the main agricultural products of Latin America?

The major agricultural products of Latin American regions include livestock and grains, such as maize, wheat, soybeans, and rice. Increased temperatures and altered hydrological cycles are predicted to translate to shorter growing seasons, overall reduced biomass production, and lower grain yields. Brazil, Mexico and Argentina alone contribute 70-90% of the total agricultural production in Latin America. In these and other dry regions, maize production is expected to decrease. A study summarizing a number of impact studies of climate change on agriculture in Latin America indicated that wheat is expected to decrease in Brazil, Argentina and Uruguay. Livestock, which is the main agricultural product for parts of Argentina, Uruguay, southern Brazil, Venezuela, and Colombia is likely to be reduced. Variability in the degree of production decrease among different regions of Latin America is likely. For example, one 2003 study that estimated future maize production in Latin America predicted that by 2055 maize in eastern Brazil will have moderate changes while Venezuela is expected to have drastic decreases.


How will ENSO affect monsoons?

ENSO ( El Niño Southern Oscillation) will affect monsoon patterns more intensely in the future as climate change warms up the ocean’s water. Crops that lie on the equatorial belt or under the tropical Walker circulation, such as rice, will be affected by varying monsoon patterns and more unpredictable weather. Scheduled planting and harvesting based on weather patterns will become less effective.


What is fall armyworm?

The fall armyworm, Spodoptera frugiperda, is a highly invasive plant pest that has in the recent years spread to countries in Sub-Saharan African. The spread of this plant pest is linked to climate change as experts confirm that climate change is bringing more crop pests to Africa and it is expected that these highly invasive crop pests will spread to other parts of the planet since they have a high capacity to adapt to different environments. The fall armyworm can have massive damage to crops, especially maize, which affects agricultural productivity.


Why are hail storms more common in North America?

In North America, fewer hail days will occur overall due to climate change, but storms with larger hail might become more common (including hail that is larger than 1.6-inch). Hail that is larger than 1.6-inch can quite easily break (glass) greenhouses.

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Carbon Sequestration in Soils

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We’ve said it before and we’ll say it again: Organic agriculture can remove from the air and sequester 7,000 pounds of carbon dioxide per acre per year. The Rodale Institute study that found that staggering number also found that, when properly executed, organic agriculture does not compromise yield. As a matter of fact, in d…

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Agriculture as Carbon Cap and Storage

  • Scaling up from soil to the entire industry, the agricultural sector could be “broadly carbon neutral” by 2030, effectively negating the agricultural industry’s humongous carbon footprint. Translation: We would avoid emitting a whopping 2 gigatonnes — that’s 2 billion metric tonnes — of carbon dioxide. Given that, practicing sustainable agriculture, along with reducing deforestation, is far m…

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Local Food Systems and Greenhouse Gas Emissions

  • Combined with the two big green steps mentioned above, local food systems can help reduce agriculture’s impact on global warming even further. The example that resident sustainability engineer Pablo used for calculation — cherries grown close enough to be transported by truck rather than airplane — won’t apply to everything, but the lesson is clear: Employing organic agricu…

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Industrial Agriculture’s Huge Carbon Footprint

  • On the other side of the equation, industrial agriculture — the practice currently employed by the majority of the developed world — has a hugely negative impact on global warming. The U.S. food system contributes nearly 20 percent of the nation’s carbon dioxide emissions; on a global scale, figures from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) say that agricultural land us…

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Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Fertilizer and Pesticide Use

  • But wait, there’s more! If we consider some of the embodied energy required for industrial ag, it gets worse. According to Will Allen, green farmer extraordinaire, including all the “manufacture and use of pesticides and fertilizers, fuel and oil for tractors, equipment, trucking and shipping, electricity for lighting, cooling, and heating, and emissions of carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous o…

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Land Use Changes and Agriculture

  • It’s not just the actual farming (if you can call it that) that makes industrial agriculture so detrimental. In almost every case, land use changes — say, deforestation, or paving over green space for suburban expansion — result in more surface warming. One exception: When deforestation occurs to create more agricultural land. That’s right, deforestation results in surfac…

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Introduction

  • Agriculture is the growing of plants (crops) and animals (livestock) for food and other purposes. In 2007, lands used for crop growing and animal grazing took up 40–50% of Earth’s land surface, a 10% increase since 1961. Agriculture contributes to global climate change by releasing carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4), and nitrous oxide (N2O), the t…

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Historical Background and Scientific Foundations

  • For most of the human race’s existence, it did not practice agriculture. For many hundreds of thousands of years, humans and their near-human ancestors practiced various forms of hunting and gathering, finding edible plants and animals in the environment rather than raising them. The first known tools, made about 2.5 million years ago, were food processors, chipped stones devis…

See more on encyclopedia.com


Impacts and Issues

  • Is Meat the Number One Cause of Global Warming?
    In 2007, vegan and animal-rights organizations ran ads in the U.S. media stating that emissions from meat-raising contribute more to global warmingthan cars do. For example, an ad by the group People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA) read: “Too Chicken to Go Vegetarian? …
  • Mitigation of Agricultural Emissions
    Altered agricultural practices can reduce agriculture’s contribution to global warming. More efficient delivery of nitrogen to crops would reduce N2O emissions and other ecological harms; livestock management for more efficient digestion of feeds would save money and reduce CH4…

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Primary Source Connection

  • Methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O) are major greenhouse gases. Agriculture is a common, and often overlooked, contributor of methane and nitrous oxide. Both methane and nitrous oxide are produced naturally by livestock and soil management. Some human-controlled agricultural management techniques, however, increase methane and nitrous oxide production. This article …

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Bibliography

  • Books
    Parry, M. L., et al, eds. Climate Change 2007: Impacts, Adaptation and Vulnerability: Contribution of Working Group II to the Fourth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. New York: Cambridge UniversityPress, 2007.
  • Periodicals
    Asner, Gregory P. “Grazing Systems, Ecosystem Responses, and Global Change.” Annual Review of Environment and Resources29 (2004): 261–299. Deutsch, Claudia H. “Trying to Connect the Dinner Plate to Climate Change.” The New York Times(August 29, 2007). Izaurralde, R. César, et …

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