How does agriculture and food production affect climate change

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How does agricultural production affect climate change?

Agriculture emits an estimated 10.5 percent of total U.S. greenhouse gases; however, agriculture also provides opportunities to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and remove carbon dioxide from the atmosphere.


How does food production affect climate change?

Food system activities, including producing food, transporting it, and storing wasted food in landfills, produce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions that contribute to climate change.


How much does agriculture affect climate change?

Emissions and Trends In 2020, greenhouse gas emissions from the agriculture economic sector accounted for 11% of total U.S. greenhouse gas emissions. Greenhouse gas emissions from agriculture have increased by 6% since 1990.


How does food production affect the environment?

Food waste produces 3.3 billion tons of carbon dioxide, a greenhouse gas that contributes to climate change. If food waste were a country it would be the third largest emitter of greenhouse gases after the US and China. By the year 2050 the world’s population will increase 33% to 10 billion.


How does agriculture affect the environment?

Agriculture contributes to a number larger of environmental issues that cause environmental degradation including: climate change, deforestation, biodiversity loss, dead zones, genetic engineering, irrigation problems, pollutants, soil degradation, and waste.


How much does food contribute to climate change?

Soil tillage, crop and livestock transportation, manure management and all the other aspects of global food production generate greenhouse gas emissions to the tune of more than 17 billion metric tons per year, according to a new study published on Monday in Nature Food.


How much does food waste contribute to global warming?

Global food loss and waste generate annually 4.4 GtCO2 eq, or about 8% of total anthropogenic GHG emissions (5). This means that the contribution of food wastage emissions to global warming is almost equivalent (87%) to global road transport emissions (6).


What is the biggest contributor to climate change?

Among the various long-lived greenhouse gases (GHGs) emitted by human activities, CO2 is so far the largest contributor to climate change, and, if anything, its relative role is expected to increase in the future.


Overview


Impacts on Crops

  • Despite technological improvements that increase corn yields, extreme weather events have caused significant yield reductions in some years. Source: USGCRP (2009) Click the image to view a larger version. Crops grown in the United States are critical for the food supply here and around the world. U.S. farms supply nearly 25% of all grains (such as wheat, corn, and rice) on the globa…

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Impacts on Livestock

  • Livestock locations in the continental United States. Source: USGCRP (2016) Click the image to view a larger version.Americans consume more than 36 million metric tons of meat and poultry annually. Livestock and poultry account for over half of U.S. agricultural cash receipts, often over $100 billion per year.Changes in climate could affect animals both directly and indirectly. 1. Hea…

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Impacts on Fisheries

  • American fishermen catch or harvest five million metric tons of fish and shellfish each year. U.S. fisheries contribute more than $1.55 billion to the economy annually (as of 2012).Many fisheries already face multiple stresses, including overfishing and water pollution. Climate change may worsen these stresses. In particular, temperature changes could lead to significant impacts. Thi…

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International Impacts

  • Climate change is very likely to affect food security at the global, regional, and local level. Climate change can disrupt food availability, reduce access to food, and affect food quality.For example, projected increases in temperatures, changes in precipitation patterns, changes in extreme weather events, and reductions in water availability may …

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