How does agriculture impact elephant poaching

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The nitrogen contained in elephant dung also plays a vital role in these forests, as nitrogen is essential for tree growth. Fewer elephants means less tree growth, and that impacts the plants and animals that thrive in those environments. Elephant poaching also affects communities.

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Answer

What are the impacts of elephant poaching?

The outrageous impacts of elephant poaching are well-known; it is brutal, shameful, and unnecessary; entire elephant families are gunned down and animals’ faces are literally hacked away to extract the valuable tusks. Allowing this trade to flourish has expressed a lot of danger and grave risk to the people not elephants alone.

Should we spend money to stop elephants poachers?

More people visit nature reserves that have more elephants, according to the analysis done by the researchers. This is especially true in Southern, Eastern, and Western Africa. In those regions, the money you’d have to spend to stop poachers is less than the return on investment you’d see from tourism dollars, according to the study.

How many elephants are killed by poachers each year in India?

Studies undertaken by Raman Sukumar in India suggest that ivory poaching was responsible for between 44 and 68% of all male elephant deaths in three Indian provinces.

How does poaching affect biodiversity?

The defaunation of an area due to poaching flows from the immediate impact of killing an existing animal, the medium-term effect of reducing breeding numbers and hence the rate of reproduction, and the long-term effects of thinning the gene pool and the symbiotic- and often irreversible – impact this has on overall biodiversity.

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How are elephants affected by poaching?

Recent research has found that if elephants continue to be poached, the decrease in population will affect the majority of the forests in Central Africa. This is due to the way elephants help disperse seeds, spreading different species of plants much further than would happen without them.


What is the main reason for the poaching of elephants?

Poachers kill about 20,000 elephants every single year for their tusks, which are then traded illegally in the international market to eventually end up as ivory trinkets. This trade is mostly driven by demand for ivory in parts of Asia.


How do elephants affect farming?

When elephants damage food and cash crops, they affect a rural farmer’s livelihoods. Elephants in large groups can destroy large areas of crops in a single night. While elephants target staple food crops such as maize, they also damage cash crops such as cotton and cocoa.


Why is elephant poaching a threat to the environment?

“Without intervention to stop poaching, as much as 96 percent of Central Africa’s forests will undergo major changes in tree-species composition and structure as local populations of elephants are extirpated, and surviving populations are crowded into ever-smaller forest remnants,” explained John Poulson from Duke …


What are the effects of poaching?

The loss of one species can have a chain reaction, leading to the loss of other plants and animals or even the collapse of the entire ecosystem. The illegal hunting and harvesting of animals are the second biggest direct threat to species after habitat destruction.


What are the causes of poaching?

Some people have religious obligations and traditions that involve rare animals. A group of Tibetan monks illegally obtain or hunt rare creatures due to religious obligations (McLachlan). As one can see, causes of poaching are done for many reasons, such as food, religion, money, and even lack of enforcement.


How does agricultural expansion cause human/wildlife conflict?

Human and wildlife have been in conflict because farming crops generally offer a rich food source for wildlife as well as for people. Large wild herbivores compete for fallow resources with livestock and can act as reservoirs of livestock diseases.


Are elephants used in farming?

Farming near Banke National Park in Nepal brings a particular set of challenges. In addition to predators eating livestock, wild elephants eat the rice harvest and destroy other crops. A pair of trained elephants have changed the fortunes of farmers in the area.


What human activity is affecting elephants?

Anthropogenic activities such as global warming, poaching, mining, deforestation and noise pollution could impact the morphology of African elephants. It is known that increased emissions of human-caused greenhouse gases are warming up the earth.


How do elephants impact the environment?

Elephants are “ecosystem engineers”: They push over trees to maintain savanna ecosystems, excavate waterholes and fertilize land, which helps other animals thrive.


What would happen if elephants were removed from the ecosystem?

Ecosystems without elephants would struggle to support themselves. For example, elephants break branches off trees, sometimes the entire tree itself. It may seem destructive, but this creates micro-habitats for seedlings and small animals, like mongooses, and invertebrate animals such as butterflies.


What are three threats to elephants today?

Today, the greatest threat to African elephants is wildlife crime, primarily poaching for the illegal ivory trade, while the greatest threat to Asian elephants is habitat loss, which results in human-elephant conflict.


Why are African elephants being poached?

Despite a ban on the international trade in ivory, African elephants are still being poached in large numbers. Tens of thousands of elephants are being killed every year for their ivory tusks. The ivory is often carved into ornaments and jewellery – China is the biggest consumer market for such products.


Where is elephant poaching most common?

AfricaMost of the poaching takes place in Africa. The Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES) reports that 25,000 elephants were killed in Africa in 2012, though other observers say it could be many more. In Tanzania alone, poachers kill 30 elephants a day.


What are the two reasons for Tuskless elephants?

Elephants have evolved to be tuskless because of ivory poaching, a study finds Researchers have pinpointed how years of civil war and poaching in Mozambique have led to a greater proportion of elephants that will never develop tusks.


Why are elephants hunted for their ivory tusks?

One of the main reasons that elephants are poached is because of their ivory. Despite the international ivory trade being banned, they are still being poached in large numbers. Their ivory tusks are used for ornaments, jewelry, billiards balls, piano keys and other items that humans enjoy.


How much does elephant poaching cost?

Elephant poaching costs economies $25 million a year — and the threat of extinction makes it much worse. An envelope. It indicates the ability to send an email.


How many elephants are there in the wild?

More than 10 million elephants roamed the forests and savannas of Africa at the beginning of the 20th century. There are now fewer than 500,000 in the wild.


What is elephant poaching?

Elephant Poaching. The poaching of elephants for ivory, meat, hide and other parts (mainly for use in traditional medicine) is still prevalent in many countries across Asia. Despite worldwide protection through the Convention.


Why are Asian elephants less prone to poaching than African elephants?

It is important to state that Asian elephants are far less prone to poaching than African elephants because only some Asian males have tusks and both sexes are tusk bearing in African elephants. However, among ivory carvers it is said that Asian ivory is of a higher quality.


What is poaching in Asia?

Poaching for the Entertainment and Other Industries. In some parts of Asia, wild elephants are captured live, trained and put to work. This is a form of poaching that removes elephants from the wild. Although officially banned, it is known that elephant capture on a significant scale still continues in Burma to provide elephants for …


How many elephant deaths are caused by ivory poaching?

Studies undertaken by Raman Sukumar in India suggest that ivory poaching was responsible for between 44 and 68% of all male elephant deaths in three Indian provinces. There is also widespread evidence of poaching in other parts of southeast Asia; particularly Cambodia, Vietnam and Laos where alarming decreases in the elephant population seem …


Where are elephants captured?

The elephants are captured in Burma, smuggled over the border and given false registration papers showing the animals to be born in captivity. Wild elephant capture often results in elephant deaths, particularly if the poachers are trying to capture young elephants.


Do poachers kill elephants?

The use of exotic animal products in traditional Asian medicine is well known and sadly elephants are no exception. It is known that poachers killing elephants for medicinal products will poison waterholes and track fallen elephants before stripping the carcass.


Is elephant hide uneconomical?

The time and energy required to prepare and transport the meat, as well as reluctance by many populations to countenance the eating of elephant, makes it an uneconomical endeavour. Elephant hide however does have value and high quality clothes and furnishings of elephant leather are sold in boutiques across Asia.


How many studies have been done on elephant poaching?

Image Credit: John Poulson. The researchers reached their conclusion after analyzing more than 158 independent studies involving elephant poaching and how it impacts surrounding habitats.


Why are elephants important to the ecosystem?

“Many of Central Africa’s forests are nitrogen limited. Elephants help compensate by moving nutrients, especially nitrogen, across the landscape as they defecate.


Is poaching a problem in Central Africa?

Poaching is a widespread issue affecting elephants in Central Africa , but a new paper published in the journal Conservation Biology by Duke University researchers underscores how this heinous act can impact considerably more than just the elephants themselves. Elephant poaching does more to the surrounding ecosystem than initially thought.


Who is Anthony Bouchard?

Anthony is a technology junkie that has vast experience in computer systems and automobile mechanics, as opposite as those sound.


Does elephant poaching harm the ecosystem?

As it would seem, elephant poaching does significantly more harm to Central African ecosystems than initially realized. The results of the study serve as an alarming wake-up call, reminding us how imperative it is that we put a full stop to poaching in its entirety. Unfortunately, this is easier said than done.


How does poaching affect the environment?

Environmental Effect. “The environmental impacts of poaching are sometimes clearly visible and sometimes much harder to identify, at least in the short term. The most obvious impact is a depletion in the number of wildlife present in a given area. The defaunation of an area due to poaching flows from the immediate impact …


How does poaching affect wildlife?

Wildlife poaching has grave consequences for targeted species and their habitats. Besides, it has clear environmental implications, which illustrate how our environment is connected to our well-being and economy, as this illegal activity negatively affects ecosystems, our health and prosperity of local communities. ​.


What are the consequences of poaching?

​. In Africa, illegal poaching has led to the extinction of wild rhinoceros in Mozambique. And many other regions across the continent have witnessed a drop by 97 percent in rhino populations just over the last 100 years.


Why is the sixth mass extinct?

“As the global human population increases, and because illegal wildlife trade is so financially lucrative, demand for wildlife and their parts has greatly increased, leading many species to become threatened or endangered. Wildlife poaching has grave consequences for targeted species and their habitats.


What happens when one species goes extinct?

When just one species becomes extinct, especially if it is a keystone species within the ecosystem, the balance of the ecosystem is thrown off. The loss of one species can have a chain reaction, leading to the loss of other plants and animals or even the collapse of the entire ecosystem.


How much money does elephant poaching cost?

The current elephant poaching crisis costs African countries around USD $25 million annually in lost tourism revenue. Research shows that tourism revenue lost to the current poaching crisis exceeds the anti-poaching costs necessary to stop the decline of elephants, signaling strong economic incentive for countries to protect elephant populations.


How does the extinction of a species affect tourism?

“In economic terms, the extinction of a species can have a negative effect on local tourism. The area not only becomes less attractive to potential tourists , but it also means that there is an increased chance of “tourist boycott.” A boycott could have a detrimental effect on a local economy since restaurants, hotels, rentals, and other attractions would suffer great losses in revenue.


Why are elephants poached?

Elephants are poached primarily for ivory, and rhinos for their horns. Poaching threatens many species and can contribute to extinction. It can also have a tremendous impact on the environment, especially when a keystone species such as the elephant is targeted.


How many elephants die from poaching?

Today, it’s estimated that poaching is responsible for the deaths of 10,000 to 15,000 elephants every year. With only about 350,000 elephants left in Africa, the animals are in danger of being eliminated there. They survive in small groups that are heavily protected.


How many elephants are killed by poachers in Africa?

The poaching of elephants has consequences beyond the obvious. First of all, there is the loss of these beautiful creatures: statistics indicated a mortality rate from poaching in Africa of more than 10% at its peak in 2011. About 100,000 African elephants were poached between 2014 and 2017. Today, it’s estimated that poaching is responsible for the deaths of 10,000 to 15,000 elephants every year. With only about 350,000 elephants left in Africa, the animals are in danger of being eliminated there. They survive in small groups that are heavily protected. They are considered a vulnerable species, while the Asian elephant is endangered.


What are elephants’ tusks?

Elephants are the largest mammals on land and are characterized by their long trunks, large ears and huge bodies. They are found in 37 countries in Africa as well as in Asia. Elephants rely on their trunks to siphon up water for drinking and bathing, to greet and touch and other elephants, to sound warnings and to pick up objects.#N#It is their tusks, however, that place them in danger of poaching. Both female and male African elephants grow tusks, which are actually long, extended teeth. Elephants use these extended teeth for a number of purposes, including stripping bark from trees for food, moving objects and for defense against predators. In dry times or when water is scarce, elephants will use their tusks to dig in the ground for water. Like humans being right- or left-handed, elephants can be right- or left-tusked, which means they tend to use one more than the other.#N#African elephants can weigh up to 8 tons and are larger than Asian elephants. Asian elephants have smaller ears and are also less likely to have tusks — female Asian elephants do not grow tusks, and not all males do. These makes them less of a target for poachers.#N#In Africa, there are two types of subspecies of elephants: the forest elephant and the savanna, or bush, elephant. The savanna elephant is the one that people tend to think of when they picture an elephant. It is larger than the forest elephant and is found in greater numbers. The tusks of the savanna elephant curve upward, and like all tusks, continue growing throughout the elephant’s life.#N#Forest elephants, as their name implies, live in thickly forested areas in Central and West Africa. They are more elusive than savanna elephants and are more difficult to count because of their habitat preferences. Researchers usually estimate their numbers based on the dung that they find instead of counting the number of animals they actually see.#N#Elephants are highly intelligent animals. Females and calves live together in related groups, headed by a matriarch, or female leader, for years. An adult female elephant is pregnant for 22 months before she gives birth to a single calf every four or five years. The adult elephants care for the calves, and female calves may stay with the herd for their entire lives. Male calves leave when they grow up and then live alone or in small groups with other males.#N#Because of their size, elephants need large areas of land to meet their requirements for space, food and water. In just one day, one elephant can eat hundreds of pounds of plants, spending up to 18 hours feeding. Because of the variety of plants they eat, they scatter the seeds of a wide range of plants throughout the areas they travel via their dung.


How long do elephants live together?

Elephants are highly intelligent animals. Females and calves live together in related groups, headed by a matriarch, or female leader, for years. An adult female elephant is pregnant for 22 months before she gives birth to a single calf every four or five years.


What is the role of nitrogen in elephant dung?

The nitrogen contained in elephant dung also plays a vital role in these forests, as nitrogen is essential for tree growth . Fewer elephants means less tree growth, and that impacts the plants and animals that thrive in those environments. Elephant poaching also affects communities.


Why do people poach animals?

The demand is global but is particularly strong in China and other parts of Asia, where people typically use poached animals to create traditional medicines, to serve as delicacies or to keep as exotic pets. Elephants are poached primarily for ivory, and rhinos for their horns.


What is elephant poaching?

Elephant poaching funds terrorist networks. While the highest levels of poaching stem from central Africa, poaching is steadily increasing across all African states. It is widely believed that trade in illegal ivory funds terrorist networks, rebel militia, and organized crime syndicates, who use the money generated to fund wars, …


Why are elephants killed?

And also, they are frequently killed due to conflict with human settlements. According to the WWF, habitat loss is considered a huge threat to the long-term survival of the African elephant.


How many elephants were killed in 2012?

650 elephants were killed by Sudanese militia armed with machine guns in Bouba N’Djida National Park, Cameroon, in 2012. 22 elephants were killed in Garamba National Park and the Democratic Republic of Congo.


When will elephants be extinct in 2021?

July 6, 2021 by Our Endangered World. Elephant poaching for Ivory trades is rampant for years, giving a massive toll on the elephants and the environment. Awareness was raised, concerns about the giant existing land animals and Ivory trades are stopped. But still, there are thousands of elephants killed for ivory despite banning such extensive …


Why are elephants threatened?

Inhabitants that fall outside protected natural areas are threatened by a rapid expansion of human settlements and agricultural lands. This poses the threat of habitat loss as forest ecosystems are cleared for agriculture and human settlements.


When did ivory stop being traded?

To curb the slaughter of elephants, CITES (Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora) initiated a ban on the international trade in ivory in 1989. This initially eliminated some of the major outlets, and as a result, elephant populations started to recover in some regions.


Does elephant slaughter kill non-target species?

This method not only wipes out whole herds of elephants but also indiscriminately kills non-target species. It has a huge ecological impact that continues to decimate elephants and other wildlife well into the future. Clearly, this rampant slaughter is unsustainable.

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The Ivory Trade


Poaching For Hide and Meat

  • Elephant killings for meat alone are rare and usually the result of a chance encounter in the forest. The time and energy required to prepare and transport the meat, as well as reluctance by many populations to countenance the eating of elephant, makes it an uneconomical endeavour. Elephant hide however does have value and high quality clothes and …

See more on eleaid.com


Poaching For Medicinal Use

  • The use of exotic animal products in traditional Asian medicine is well known and sadly elephants are no exception. It is known that poachers killing elephants for medicinal products will poison waterholes and track fallen elephants before stripping the carcass.

See more on eleaid.com


Poaching For The Entertainment and Other Industries

  • In some parts of Asia, wild elephants are captured live, trained and put to work. This is a form of poaching that removes elephants from the wild. Although officially banned, it is known that elephant capture on a significant scale still continues in Burma to provide elephants for the logging industry. EleAidis also aware of the existence of poaching operations designed to captur…

See more on eleaid.com

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