How has saudi arabia turned desert areas into agricultural fields

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The government, in particular, has aided with this process by converting large areas of desert into agricultural fields. By implementing major irrigation projects and adopting large-scale mechanization, this has progressed in developing agriculture in the country, adding previously barren areas to the stock of cultivatable land.

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What is agricultural development like in Saudi Arabia?

 · How Saudi Arabia’s is Turning it’s Desert into an Oasisregenerative agriculture desert oasis saudi arabia agriculture farming desertification center pivot ir…

How does Saudi Arabia’s water policy affect agriculture?

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Is the future of farming in the UAE in the desert?

 · The cost of treatment per hectare (2.4 acres) of desert varies from $1,800-$9,500 (£1,300-£6,900) depending upon the size of the project – which currently makes it too …

Is Saudi Arabia a desert or desert?

 · When Al-Haddad founded his “Abazeer” market in 1985, the Saudi government had just intensified farming in the mostly desert landscape to achieve self-sufficiency in wheat …

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What is Saudi Arabia’s agriculture?

Agriculture in Saudi Arabia is focused on the export of dates, dairy products, eggs, fish, poultry, fruits, vegetables, and flowers to markets around the world as it has achieved self-sufficiency in the production of such products. The government of Saudi Arabia is heavily involved in the agriculture industry, and the ministry of agriculture …


How much did Saudi agriculture contribute to the GDP in 1984?

The contribution of agriculture to the gross domestic product (GDP) in 1984 was 3.3%.


What is the FAO’s recommendation for the desert?

The Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) recommends in a report that paying extra consideration on creating and nurturing the agrosystem in the desert may lead to an interference in the ecosystem of the desert which would lead to unpleasant results [3] .


How did nomadism decline?

Nomadic pastoralism declined as a result of several political and economic forces. Sedentarization was a means of imposing political control over various tribal groupings in the Arabian Peninsula. New legal structures such as the 1968 Public Lands Distribution Ordinance created novel land relations and spurred the dissolution of the Bedouin way of life. The establishment of an activist modern state provided incentives for large numbers of Saudi citizens to enter the regular, wage-based, or urban commercial employment. Moreover, modern technology and new transport networks undermined the primitive services that the Bedouin offered the rest of the economy.


What was the main objective of the Saudi government in the 1970s?

During the 1970s and 1980s, the government undertook a massive restructuring of agriculture in Saudi Arabia. The stated objectives were food security through self-sufficiency and improvement of rural incomes.


What is the government of Saudi Arabia?

The government of Saudi Arabia is heavily involved in the agriculture industry, and the ministry of agriculture (part of the Ministry of Environment, Water and Agriculture) is primarily responsible for the agricultural policies in the nation. The private sector also plays a role in the nation’s agriculture, as the government offers long-term …


How much watermelon does Saudi Arabia produce?

Production. Saudi Arabia produced, in 2018: 1.3 million tons of date (2nd largest producer in the world, second only to Egypt); 634 thousand tons of watermelon; 624 thousand tons of barley; 586 thousand tons of wheat; 482 thousand tons of potato;


What is the future of farming in the desert?

This makes farming in the desert impractical so the UAE imports about 80% of its food. Yet for many, this might be the future of farming. Increased drought, deforestation and intensive farming methods are turning an area half the size of Britain into desert each year. According to the United Nations, by 2030, 135 million people could lose their …


How long does desert control last?

The soil requires a 15%-20% retreatment after four or five years if the land is tilled and if untilled then the treatment lasts for longer. Desert Control says initially it will target municipal governments and commercial growers, but eventually would like to make the cost accessible to all growers.


What crops are grown in the UAE?

Back in the UAE, Faisal agreed to host a trial of Liquid Nanoclay last December, and two areas were planted with a selection of crops: tomatoes, aubergines and okra.


Where is Faisal Al Shimmari?

Related Topics. Climate change. image caption. Faisal Al Shimmari hopes the innovation will help him create “a human Garden of Eden” in the desert. Faisal Mohammed Al Shimmari farms in some of the most extreme conditions in the world, at Al Ain, an oasis in the United Arab Emirates desert, where temperatures can reach 50C.


How many people will die from desertification in 2030?

According to the United Nations, by 2030, 135 million people could lose their homes and livelihoods to desertification. That raises the challenge of how to grow food in increasingly hostile conditions, but one scientist has come up with an innovation that could turn those deserts green again.


Does sand hold water longer?

Normal sand particles are very loose, which means that they have a very low water retention capacity. But when you add Liquid Nanoclay to the sand it binds those sand particles together, says Kristian, which means it can hold water for longer, “increasing the possibility of agricultural yield”.


How hard was it to turn a field into fertile land?

It was very hard to turn the fields from sandy soil into fertile land. There were highly inefficient irrigation methods in use, such as giant irrigation systems, where up to half of the sprayed water evaporates before it reaches the ground. The consequences are apparent today.


When did Al-Haddad start his abazeer market?

When Al-Haddad founded his “Abazeer” market in 1985, the Saudi government had just intensified farming in the mostly desert landscape to achieve self-sufficiency in wheat production. Then, at the beginning of the nineties, Saudi Arabia was one of the world’s largest exporters of wheat.


Where does Khalid Al-Haddad’s bread come from?

Khalid Al-Haddad is particularly proud of his homemade bread. Not only is it baked in the in-house oven, but all the ingredients come from his own produce. Al-Haddad is the owner of the “Abazeer” market in the center of Jeddah on the Red Sea, the second-largest city in Saudi Arabia. And the shop’s assortment is impressive.


How has farming helped Saudi Arabia?

Better-informed practices and technological advancement of farming in Sau di Arabia have helped in creating a more sustainable domestic food supply in the Kingdom. Learning from its mistakes in the 1980s, the Saudi government has targeted its subsidies and projects toward more efficient crops and projects, like fish farming. Additionally, it has pivoted away from crops and growth methods having to do with wastewater. Technology like satellite use aides in current Saudi production while new, pioneering technology like Liquid Nanoclay provides hope for the future of Saudi food security and sustainability. Even though food imports still make up the majority of its supply, the Saudi government has recognized this issue and is making a concerted effort into reforming its agriculture industry. These efforts have the potential to help Saudi Arabia avoid a major food and poverty crisis in the future.


Why is agriculture important in Saudi Arabia?

A top priority for the Kingdom is increasing efficiency in its use of limited natural resources while developing rural areas. Farming is an important source of employment in the Kingdom, so supporting agribusiness in Saudi Arabia not only improves food security but the overall lives of many.


What is the aquaculture industry in Saudi Arabia?

Aquaculture also saw its start in the 1980s, but today it is the fastest-growing animal food cultivation industry in Saudi Arabia.


What is the importance of oil in Saudi Arabia?

Only about 1.5% of the land area of Saudi Arabia is arable, and what agriculture the country does have ends up taking over 80% of the Kingdom’s precious water supply. While the country is currently food-secure, farming in Saudi Arabia has been a crucial area of interest for those who wish to expand Saudi sustainability and shore up potential risks in global food supply network crashes.


Why did Saudi Arabia start subsidized agriculture?

Saudi Arabia originally attempted agricultural self-sufficiency with aggressive government subsidies for farmers in the 1980s due to volatile food imports. Poor techniques and mismanagement of water resources forced the reimagining of these efforts in 2007. Now, the Kingdom subsidizes the use of manufactured feed for livestock farmers and encourages vegetable growth using greenhouses and drip irrigation methods. These techniques conserve water while ensuring a more sustainable food supply.


How much of Saudi Arabia is arable?

Only about 1.5% of the land area of Saudi Arabia is arable, and what agriculture the country does have ends up taking over 80% of the Kingdom’s precious water supply. While the country is currently food-secure, farming in Saudi Arabia has been a crucial area of interest for those who wish to expand Saudi sustainability and shore up potential risks …


When did aquaculture start?

Aquaculture also saw its start in the 1980s, but today it is the fastest-growing animal food cultivation industry in Saudi Arabia. Government support is a large driver of this — to enhance food security, the government allocated $35 billion toward Vision 2030 projects that include aquaculture funding. Examples of these projects include establishing …


Why did the Saudi government expand the agricultural sector?

It was hoped that eventually the nation would become self sufficient for food. This was an ambitious goal considering a majority of Saudi Arabia is desert where the potential for crop cultivation is limited.


What happened to grain production in the Gulf War?

With the outbreak of the Gulf War (1990-91), agricultural subsidies were reduced and, with funds needed for military expenditures, quotas were imposed on government purchases of grain from local farmers. By 1995-96, the land area devoted to grain production had fallen by over 65 percent. The harvest that year fell to 1.2 million tons. Meanwhile, domestic consumption stood at 1.8 million tons. Although the production of barley and grain had markedly declined by the late 1990s, fruit and vegetable production rose.


How did agriculture increase in the 1980s?

Government involvement in agriculture peaked in the 1980s. With production heavily subsidized, the value added in agriculture grew by 70 percent between 1985 and 1991. (Value added is the increase in the market value of a product at a particular stage of production. It is calculated by subtracting the value of all inputs bought from other firms from the value of the firm’s output. For example, the value added by the cotton textile industry is the value of the textiles when they leave the factory minus the value of raw cotton and other materials used in their manufacture.) In the 1991-92 crop year, wheat production rose to an all-time high of 4 million tons, with Saudi Arabia becoming the world’s sixth largest wheat exporter. However, earnings from sales were nullified by the high costs of production. The government was spending 5 times the market price to produce a ton of grain.


What was the wheat production in 1991?

In the 1991-92 crop year, wheat production rose to an all-time high of 4 million tons, with Saudi Arabia becoming the world’s sixth largest wheat exporter. However, earnings from sales were nullified by the high costs of production. The government was spending 5 times the market price to produce a ton of grain.


Is desalinated water saline?

Desalinated sea water, which is used for some purposes in Saudi Arabia, is too saline, even after treatment, to be used for farming. The Saudi government, in its push to increase food production, had by the mid-1990s turned over 2.8 million hectares of public land to the private sector for agricultural use.


Why did the government allow landowners to dig wells in the desert?

Back in the 1970s, the government allowed landowners to dig as many wells as they desired, in order to transform the desert into lush farmland. An agricultural boom followed, and Saudi Arabia improbably became the world’s sixth-largest exporter of wheat.


Which country squandered its groundwater and agriculture collapsed?

Share All sharing options for: Saudi Arabia squandered its groundwater and agriculture collapsed. California, take note. Agriculture in the desert in Sakakah, Saudi Arabia, on January 18, 2010. Many of the world’s most important farming regions can’t rely on rain alone to water all their crops.


What are some examples of aquifers?

Notable examples include the Central Valley in California or the Indus Basin in Pakistan and India. The problem is that these underground aquifers take a long, long time to recharge. So if farmers are drawing water faster than it gets replenished, the basins will eventually run dry.


Which aquifer system supports 60 million people?

Topping their list was none other than the Arabian Aquifer System, which straddles Saudi Arabia and Yemen and supports some 60 million people. Also in worrisome shape were the Indus Basin that straddles India and Pakistan and the Murzuq-Djado Basin in Africa.


When did California put a law on aquifer management?

In 2014, California passed a law to put aquifer management on sustainable footing, but that will take years to take effect. These groundwater withdrawals have helped farmers weather the current drought, and they’re a big reason why California’s farm revenue hit record highs in 2013 and 2014.


Where do farmers get their water from?

Many of the world’s most important farming regions can’t rely on rain alone to water all their crops. So they also pull freshwater from underground aquifers that have slowly filled up over many thousands of years. Notable examples include the Central Valley in California or the Indus Basin in Pakistan and India.


Does Saudi Arabia have enough rainfall?

The problem was that Saudi Arabia doesn’t get nearly enough annual rainfall to replace those withdrawals. Its aquifers had built up over tens of thousands of years and were now being drained all at once. Not surprisingly, the party didn’t last. By the 2000s, the aquifers had become dangerously depleted.


What attracted those communities to come to Arabia, recent research points out, is a change in the weather of the

What attracted those communities to come to Arabia, recent research points out, is a change in the weather of the arid desert caused by a sudden burst of monsoon rains.


What animals are in the desert?

The lush vegetation and fresh water pools – located in what we call today the Empty Quarter, or Rubh’ Al Khali, the world’s largest desert enclaved by Saudi Arabia, Yemen, Oman, and the UAE – started attracting animals like elephants, rhinos, hippos, and crocodiles.


What is the study of fan records from southeast Arabia?

The study titled ‘Alluvial fan records from southeast Arabia reveal multiple windows for human dispersal’ was conducted mainly by the Saudi Commission for Tourism and National Heritage and Oxford University’s School of Archaeology. Prior to inviting foreign researchers, the kingdom carried out a national archaeological survey in the 1980s.


When did the monsoon rains start?

The monsoon rains that rejuvenated the once-arid soil persisted for a couple of millennia until it seized about 7,300 to 5,500 years ago , coinciding with the beginning of the Ancient Egyptian civilization, to which most of the desert inhabitants returned.


Where do monsoons rain?

Bouts of monsoon rain occasionally visit the deserts of Arabia and North Africa Source: sufdesertecology.weebly.com. Scientists from NASA believe that the monsoon rains retreated due to a change in the Earth’s axis from 24.1 degrees to the current 23.5 degrees, exposing the region’s land to more direct sunlight.


Will the desert turn green again?

Scientists predict that climate cycles that turn the desert green are bound to happen again in the region.

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Overview

Agriculture in Saudi Arabia is focused on the export of dates, dairy products, eggs, fish, poultry, fruits, vegetables, and flowers to markets around the world as it has achieved self-sufficiency in the production of such products. The government of Saudi Arabia is heavily involved in the agriculture industry, and the Ministry of Environment, Water and Agricultureis primarily responsible for the …


Production

Saudi Arabia produced, in 2018:
• 1.3 million tons of date (2nd largest producer in the world, second only to Egypt);
• 634 thousand tons of watermelon;
• 624 thousand tons of barley;


History

During the 1970s and 1980s, the government undertook a massive restructuring of agriculture in Saudi Arabia. The stated objectives were food security through self-sufficiencyand improvement of rural incomes. Although successful in raising the domestic output of several important crops and foodstuffs through the introduction of modern agricultural techniques, the agricultural development program has not entirely achieved these objectives. In regards to self-sufficiency, t…


Traditional agriculture and pastoral nomadism

In the past, the bulk of agricultural production was concentrated in a few limited areas. The produce was largely retained by these communities although some surplus was sold to the cities. Nomads played a crucial role in this regard, shipping foods and other goods between the widely dispersed agricultural areas. Livestock rearing was shared between the sedentary communities and nomads, who also used it to supplement their precarious livelihoods.


Modern agriculture

Nomadic pastoralism declined as a result of several political and economic forces. Sedentarization was a means of imposing political control over various tribal groupings in the Arabian Peninsula. New legal structures such as the 1968 Public Lands Distribution Ordinance created novel land relations and spurred the dissolution of the Bedouin way of life. The establishment of an activist modern state provided incentives for large numbers of Saudi citizens to enter the regular, wage-…


External links

• EarthTrends: Agriculture and Food – Saudi Arabia
• Country studies
• Agriculture in Saudi Arabia
• Saudi Arabia Ministry of Agriculture

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