How has the foreign agricultural service helped countries in droughts

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When was the Foreign Agricultural Service (FAS) created?

Accordingly, the Foreign Agricultural Service was created by the Foreign Agricultural Service Act of 1930 (46 Stat. 497), which President Herbert Hoover signed into law on June 5, 1930.

When did the US Department of Agriculture start working abroad?

USDA posted its first employee abroad in 1882, with assignment of Edmund Moffat to London. In 1894, USDA created a Section of Foreign Markets in its Division of Statistics, which by 1901 numbered seven employees. Roster of the Section of Foreign Markets in 1901.

Will the Mexican water shortage affect agricultural production?

The forecast of high temperatures in the summer have triggered warnings of possible water shortages affecting urban and rural communities. This report includes a general analysis of how these shortages might affect agricultural production in Mexico.

What’s in the agriculture shortages report?

This report includes a general analysis of how these shortages might affect agricultural production in Mexico. Insight and analysis from FAS’s overseas offices on issues affecting agricultural production and trade.

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What did the government do to help farmers during the drought?

The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Farm Service Agency provides financial and technical assistance to drought-affected areas through its Disaster Assistance Programs. This includes emergency assistance and loans for losses to crops, livestock, trees, and farm land.


What is the purpose of the Foreign Agricultural Service?

The Foreign Agricultural Service (FAS) links U.S. agriculture to the world to enhance export opportunities and global food security. In addition to its Washington, D.C. staff, FAS has a global network of nearly 100 offices covering approximately 180 countries.


What is the impact of drought on food security?

Drought impacts on agriculture include crop losses, lower yields in both crop and livestock production, increased livestock deaths, increases in insect infestation and plant and animal diseases, damage to fish habitat, forest and range fires, land degradation and soil erosion.


How might foreign countries benefit by the actions of the Foreign Agricultural Service?

FAS helps developing countries improve their agricultural systems and build their trade capacity. We also administer food assistance programs that help combat hunger, foster education, and ensure long-term food security.


Which country is FAS?

Soccer, El Salvador: FAS live scores, results, fixtures.


How does drought influence agricultural production?

Drought has direct and negative impacts agricultural production. Severe droughts in rainfed areas have reduced agricultural production by 20 to 40 per cent. It is no wonder then that farmers in rainfed areas are abandoning farming as a livelihood source (see ‘Farmers have decreased, farm labourers have increased’ ).


How does agriculture cause drought?

Other human activities can increase the impact of drought: Agriculture – using large amounts of water to irrigate crops removes water from lakes, rivers and groundwater. Some crops require more water than others, eg cotton.


How do droughts affect agriculture?

Drought can stunt the growth of crops, resulting in a decline in the size and quality of produce. Consumers may expect to see higher prices for local food as farmers cope with lower yields and higher expenses. Limited water availability for washing produce may lead to sanitation and health issues for consumers.


When was the Foreign Agricultural Service established?

Accordingly, the Foreign Agricultural Service was created by the Foreign Agricultural Service Act of 1930 (46 Stat. 497), which President Herbert Hoover signed into law on June 5, 1930 . The law stipulated that the FAS consist of overseas USDA officials.


When did FAS transfer agricultural attachés?

On September 1, 1954, following passage of H.R. 8033 (P.L. 83-690), the agricultural attachés were transferred back from State Department to FAS. In the same year, Congress passed Public Law 480 (P.L. 83-480), the Food for Peace Act, which became the backbone of FAS’s food aid and market development efforts.


What is FAS food assistance?

FAS has managed food assistance programs since 1941, and today uses a mix of statutory authorities. The traditional programs are Section 416 (b) of the Agricultural Act of 1949, which makes surplus commodities available for donation overseas, and Title I of Public Law 480 ( Food for Peace ), which authorizes concessional sales. These programs were designed to support government-to-government transactions. The 1985 Farm Bill created the Food for Progress program, which facilitated delivery of food aid through non-governmental organizations as well as foreign governments. Food for Progress can draw on multiple sources, including in-kind surplus commodities and appropriated funds.


What was the name of the agency that was created by the Secretary of Agriculture?

After a nine-year hiatus from international agricultural development work at USDA, on July 12, 1963, Secretary Orville Freeman ordered creation of an International Agricultural Development Service (IADS), which was subordinate to the same Assistant Secretary of Agriculture as but separate from FAS. IADS served as USDA’s liaison with USAID and other assistance organizations, linking them to USDA expertise in pursuit of developmental goals. Matthew Drosdoff was hired effective February 19, 1964, to be the first permanent Administrator of IADS. In March 1969, after the Richard Nixon Administration came to power, IADS was briefly merged into FAS, then in November 1969 was split out into a separate Foreign Economic Development Service (FEDS). On February 6, 1972, FEDS was abolished and its functions transferred to the Economic Research Service, where it became the Foreign Development Division.


Which countries were involved in the FAS tariffs?

The FAS led agricultural tariff negotiations, first concluding a new tariff agreement with Cuba, followed by Belgium, Haiti, Sweden, Brazil and Colombia. By 1939, new agricultural tariffs were in place with 20 countries, including the United Kingdom, the United States’ largest agricultural trading partner.


When did the USDA and FAS merge?

In 1961 , the General Sales Manager of USDA’s Commodity Stabilization Service (CSS) and his staff were merged into FAS, bringing with them operational responsibility for export credit and food aid programs.


When did the USDA start overseas?

USDA posted its first employee abroad in 1882, with assignment of Edmund Moffat to London. In 1894, USDA created a Section of Foreign Markets in its Division of Statistics, which by 1901 numbered seven employees.


Link to report

Increased water demand for both human consumption and agricultural production, along with lagging water management practices and lack of contingency plans has resulted in a rapid depletion of water reserves in Mexico, particularly in Northern Mexico.


Global Agricultural Information Network (GAIN)

Insight and analysis from FAS’s overseas offices on issues affecting agricultural production and trade.


Contact

Italy is suffering from a severe summer drought caused by low rainfall (80 percent below average in the first half of 2017) and exceptionally high temperatures for most of the year. Nearly two-thirds of Italian farmland has been negatively affected, with the worst hit crops being olives, tomatoes, wine grapes, fruits, vegetables, grains and hay.


Global Agricultural Information Network (GAIN)

Insight and analysis from FAS’s overseas offices on issues affecting agricultural production and trade.


What is FAS in agriculture?

The Foreign Agricultural Service (FAS ) is unique within the U.S. Government for its sole focus on global agricultural trade and food security issues. This recognized expertise is trusted by farmers and ranchers, food processors, other U.S. government agencies, and non-governmental organizations to provide sound, reliable, and consistent intelligence on foreign agricultural markets, crop conditions and agro-political dynamics. The agency’s global network of agricultural attachés and locally employed staff provide an unparalleled resource for understanding trade policy and market development issues as they arise. Through this talented and highly skilled staff FAS has built long-term, agriculture-specific relationships with foreign stakeholders that are invaluable to building institutional knowledge of host countries’ agricultural sectors. This knowledge is put to work on maintaining a level playing field for U.S. food and agricultural exports abroad and expanding new opportunities in countries with market potential.


How does FAS help the world?

FAS strengthens the capacity of foreign countries to engage in international trade, thereby expanding demand for U.S. agricultural products and enhancing global food security. USDA’s food assistance programs aim to address food security challenges by building food and market systems that expand trade and economic growth in cooperating countries. The Food for Progress Program aims to increase productivity and expands agricultural trade in developing countries. The McGovern-Dole International Food for Education program works to improve the literacy, nutrition, health, and hygiene practices of school children and their communities in low-income, high food-


What are some examples of FAS actions?

risk. For example, FAS and the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) successfully persuaded China to not prohibit U.S. honey access while the United States continues to respond to a lengthy questionnaire food safety and honeybee diseases and health. FAS pressed Nicaragua to reverse a decision to enforce an older salmonella standard that was not in line with international norms. As a result of FAS efforts, U.S. poultry now meets a performance-based standard similar to U.S. requirements. In 2017, FAS successfully negotiated with Thailand to reverse its suspension of annatto food coloring, a natural yellow food coloring, and include it in a positive list. In 2017, FAS convinced Pakistan to not modify its import requirements for soybeans, pulses, and distillers dried grains. FAS action prevented the imposition of costly and non-risk-based fumigation requirements on U.S. exports. Collectively, FAS actions preserved $600 million worth of U.S. exports in these markets alone.


What is the FAS Global Market Strategy?

FAS’ Global Market Strategy (GMS) fulfills USDA’s legislative requirement under 7 USC 5603(d)(1) to identify priority markets (A) in which imports of agricultural products show the greatest potential for increase; and (B) those markets in which, with the assistance of federal export promotion programs, exports of U.S. agricultural commodities and related products, including high-value products, show the greatest potential for increase. The GMS was developed and priority markets were determined through a comprehensive, data-driven analysis of multiple factors including historic import trends, domestic consumption and production patterns, population dynamics, GDP growth, foreign competition, free trade agreements, and retail marketing trends. Priority markets include a mixture of large mature markets where U.S. agricultural export expansion may be achievable through capturing competitor market share, as well as growth markets where economic and population dynamics are driving increased food demand. Exports are vital to the livelihoods of American farmers and ranchers, and improved access to current, expanding and new overseas markets further improves that condition.


How many trade shows did the USDA endorse in 2017?

In 2017, nearly 1,000 U.S. companies and organizations participated in 20 USDA-endorsed trade shows in 14 countries, drawing buyers from all over the world. On-site sales totaled nearly $300 million and 12-month projected sales reported by exhibitors were estimated at over $2.35 billion. The companies made over 16,000 business contacts and displayed more than 5,000 new products in various markets on all continents.


What are the most important exports in 2017?

In 2017, U.S. agricultural exports reached $140.5 billion, up $10.8 billion, or 8 percent, from 2016 and the third highest year in history. Export volumes for bulk commodities increased 11 percent to a record 160 million metric tons (MMT), while export values were up 16 percent to $51.4 billion in 2017. Soybean exports by volume were at a record 60 MMT valued at $24 billion in 2017. Exports of corn, wheat, and cotton were all up on both volume and value. Livestock, poultry, and dairy exports rose 13 percent from 2016, with beef and dairy products showing the largest value gains. Horticultural product exports increased 3 percent from 2016 to $33.9 billion, largely driven by an 8-percent increase in exports of tree nuts, which reached $8.1 billion, the second largest year ever.


How does FAS work?

FAS works to maintain and expand access to foreign markets in the face of unfair trade barriers. Removing existing barriers, while ensuring new ones are not introduced, directly helps rural America thrive and also adds jobs and income to allied sectors such as storage, transportation, and insurance. FAS draws on headquarters staff and attachés covering more than 170 countries to negotiate with foreign governments to open markets. It also works with international organizations to develop fair, transparent international trading rules and standards that facilitate trade. The agency promotes the acceptance of crops produced using biotechnology and other new technologies and the acceptance of U.S. organic standards around the world. An estimated 60-80 percent of U.S. processed food products could be negatively affected by restrictive labeling measures, testing requirements, and/or outright bans. Exports of these crops and other foods produced or processed using modern biotechnology form the core of U.S. agricultural exports that totaled $140.5 billion in 2017, while exports of high valued organic products continue to grow.


What are some ways to reduce drought?

Planting trees that require less water and that have greater drought tolerance. Managing stands at lower densities. Restoring streams and wetlands to provide better fish and wildlife habitat under low-flow conditions.


How does drought affect the ecosystem?

Ecological drought: Ecosystem effects of drought, which can increase ecosystem vulnerability to other disturbances, and can affect a variety of plants and animals in forests and rangelands. All of these can have major consequences. Reduced water quantity and quality can result in shortages to clean drinking water in communities, …


What is the OSC drought gallery?

The OSC Drought Gallery includes a variety of up-to-date resources on drought and its effects. This includes Story Maps, tools, links, and map viewers on topics such as snow drought, effects of drought on rangelands and forests, the connection between precipitation and wildfire, and more. The OSC Climate Gallery includes additional resources on many other climate issues.


What are the different types of droughts?

This can lead to: Hydrological drought: Reduced water in streams, lakes, and reservoirs. Agricultural drought: Reduced crop survival and productivity. Socio-economic drought: Reduced supply of …


Does drought increase precipitation?

Although precipitation patterns are complex, increased temperatures alone can lead to more droughts, and severe droughts are projected to increase in frequency in most regions of the United States. In order to better understand the consequences of drought, the Forest Service prepared a report, Effects of Drought on Forests and Rangelands in …

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Overview

The Foreign Agricultural Service (FAS) is the foreign affairs agency with primary responsibility for the United States Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) overseas programs — market development, international trade agreements and negotiations, and the collection of statistics and market information. It also administers the USDA’s export credit guarantee and food aid programs and helps increase income and food availability in developing nations by mobilizing expertise for agr…


Roots in analysis

USDA posted its first employee abroad in 1882, with assignment of Edmund Moffat to London. In 1894, USDA created a Section of Foreign Markets in its Division of Statistics, which by 1901 numbered seven employees.
It was succeeded over the next few decades by increasingly larger units. Creation of this series of units in Washington to analyze foreign competition a…

USDA posted its first employee abroad in 1882, with assignment of Edmund Moffat to London. In 1894, USDA created a Section of Foreign Markets in its Division of Statistics, which by 1901 numbered seven employees.
It was succeeded over the next few decades by increasingly larger units. Creation of this series of units in Washington to analyze foreign competition a…


International trade policy

In 1934, Congress passed the Reciprocal Trade Agreements Act, which stipulated that the President must consult with the Secretary of Agriculture when negotiating tariff reductions for agricultural commodities. Secretary of Agriculture Henry A. Wallace delegated this responsibility to the Foreign Agricultural Service Division, and thus began the FAS’s role in formulation and i…


Office of Foreign Agricultural Relations

OFAR began handling food aid in 1941 when President Roosevelt and the Congress authorized $1.35 billion of food assistance to Great Britain. During this period OFAR also led negotiations that resulted in creation of the International Wheat Council, and began assisting Latin American countries to develop their agriculture. This latter effort was related to the need for strategi…


FAS is reconstituted

On March 10, 1953, Secretary of Agriculture Ezra Taft Benson abolished OFAR and reconstituted the Foreign Agricultural Service. In April 1954, FAS handed off national security–related technical assistance to the International Cooperation Administration (USAID’s forerunner) and began to concentrate on foreign market development for U.S. agricultural commodities, signaling a radical shift in the agency’s focus. On September 1, 1954, following passage of H.R. 8033 (P.L. 83-690), …


Major events

Trade tensions with the European Economic Community (EEC) boiled over in 1962 with the first “Chicken War”, a trade dispute arising from the EEC’s application of protective tariffs on poultry meat imported from the United States in retaliation for President Kennedy’s imposition of a ceiling on textile imports and raising of tariffs on carpets, glass and bicycles. FAS negotiators and analysts, including future Administrator Rolland “Bud” Anderson, supported talks that resulted in …


Food aid

FAS has managed food assistance programs since 1941, and today uses a mix of statutory authorities. The traditional programs are Section 416(b) of the Agricultural Act of 1949, which makes surplus commodities available for donation overseas, and Title I of Public Law 480 (Food for Peace), which authorizes concessional sales. These programs were designed to support government-to-government transactions. The 1985 Farm Bill created the Food for Progress progr…


International development and national security

After a nine-year hiatus from international agricultural development work at USDA, on July 12, 1963, Secretary Orville Freeman ordered creation of an International Agricultural Development Service (IADS), which was subordinate to the same Assistant Secretary of Agriculture as but separate from FAS. IADS served as USDA’s liaison with USAID and other assistance organizations, linking them to USDA expertise in pursuit of developmental goals. Matthew Drosdoff was hired e…

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