How is agriculture in sumatra impacting global climate

Turning just one Sumatran province’s forests and peat swamps into pulpwood and palm oil plantations is generating more annual greenhouse gas emissions than the Netherlands and rapidly driving the province’s elephants into extinction, a new study by WWF and partners has found.Feb 29, 2008


How much does agriculture contribute to climate change globally?

Right now, agriculture generates an estimated 25% of annual greenhouse gas emissions, according to the WRI; that’s when you combine food production and the land-use changes associated with farming, such as clearing vegetation and plowing.


How does the agriculture industry contribute to climate change?

Agriculture and forestry together are estimated to account for 10.5 percent of U.S. greenhouse gas emissions in 2018, including carbon dioxide emissions associated with agricultural electricity consumption. Globally, carbon dioxide emissions are the largest contributor to climate change.


How important is agriculture to Indonesia?

Although agriculture’s importance has declined, it remains critical to the overall health of the Indonesian economy. In 2000, for example, agriculture still absorbed 45.1 percent of the Indonesian labour force. Even more importantly, agriculture provided a cushion against the effects of the Asian economic crisis.


What is causing climate change in Indonesia?

It shows that deforestation, forest fires and the degradation of peat land have been the main causes for Indonesia being the world’s third largest emitter of greenhouse gases.


Does agriculture cause global warming?

Agriculture is a significant contributor to anthropogenic global warming, and reducing agricultural emissions—largely methane and nitrous oxide—could play a significant role in climate change mitigation.


How does agriculture impact the environment?

Agriculture is the leading source of pollution in many countries. Pesticides, fertilizers and other toxic farm chemicals can poison fresh water, marine ecosystems, air and soil. They also can remain in the environment for generations.


Does Indonesia rely on agriculture?

As one of the world’s major agricultural nation, the country offers wide diversity of tropical products and important agricultural commodities; which include palm oil, natural rubber, cocoa, coffee, tea, cassava, rice and tropical spices.


How much of Indonesia economy is agriculture?

approximately 14 percentAgriculture is an important sector for Indonesia, contributes approximately 14 percent of the nation’s GDP, employs one-third of Indonesia’s labor force, and is dominated by smallholder farmers (93%).


How is the climate in Indonesia?

Indonesia’s climate is largely hot and humid, with rainfall occurring mostly in low-lying areas and mountainous regions experiencing cooler temperatures. The cities of Jakarta, Ujung Padang, Medan, Padang, and Balikpapan have an average minimum temperature of 22.8°C and a high of 30.2°C.


How has global warming affected Indonesia?

Indonesia is highly vulnerable to climate change impacts, including extreme events such as floods and droughts, and long-term changes from sea level rise, shifts in rainfall patterns and increasing temperature.


How is Indonesia vulnerable to climate change?

The combination of high population density and high levels of biodiversity together with a staggering 80,000 km of coastline and 17,508 islands, makes Indonesia one of the most vulnerable countries to the impacts of climate change.


How bad is climate change in Indonesia?

Global warming takes its course in Indonesia with surface temperatures increasing from 0.2 to 0.3 of a degree Celsius per decade. This impacts precipitation patterns, causing a wetter climate in Sumatra and Kalimantan but drier seasons in Java, Bali and Nusa Tenggara.


Carbon Sequestration in Soils


Agriculture as Carbon Cap and Storage

  • Scaling up from soil to the entire industry, the agricultural sector could be “broadly carbon neutral” by 2030, effectively negating the agricultural industry’s humongous carbon footprint. Translation: We would avoid emitting a whopping 2 gigatonnes — that’s 2 billion metric tonnes — of carbon dioxide. Given that, practicing sustainable agriculture, along with reducing deforestation, is far m…

See more on treehugger.com


Local Food Systems and Greenhouse Gas Emissions

  • Combined with the two big green steps mentioned above, local food systems can help reduce agriculture’s impact on global warming even further. The example that resident sustainability engineer Pablo used for calculation — cherries grown close enough to be transported by truck rather than airplane — won’t apply to everything, but the lesson is clear: Employing organic agricu…

See more on treehugger.com


Industrial Agriculture’s Huge Carbon Footprint

  • On the other side of the equation, industrial agriculture — the practice currently employed by the majority of the developed world — has a hugely negative impact on global warming. The U.S. food system contributes nearly 20 percent of the nation’s carbon dioxide emissions; on a global scale, figures from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Cha…

See more on treehugger.com


Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Fertilizer and Pesticide Use

  • But wait, there’s more! If we consider some of the embodied energy required for industrial ag, it gets worse. According to Will Allen, green farmer extraordinaire, including all the “manufacture and use of pesticides and fertilizers, fuel and oil for tractors, equipment, trucking and shipping, electricity for lighting, cooling, and heating, and emissions of carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous o…

See more on treehugger.com


Land Use Changes and Agriculture

  • It’s not just the actual farming (if you can call it that) that makes industrial agriculture so detrimental. In almost every case, land use changes — say, deforestation, or paving over green space for suburban expansion — result in more surface warming. One exception: When deforestation occurs to create more agricultural land. That’s right, deforestation results in surfac…

See more on treehugger.com

Leave a Comment