How is polyploidy used in the field of agriculture

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In the agriculture industry polyploidy of the plants are used to create different combinations of genes in order to cultivate a plant with specific beneficial traits, such as plants with resistance and higher fruit outcomes. Polyploidy plants tend to be more efficient in production.

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What are some examples of polyploidy in agriculture?

For example, through induced polyploidy, breeders have developed Bouschet tetraploid grapes with more yield and juice content than the diploid progenitor Alicante (Olmo, 1952). Ornamental crops such as snapdragons and marigolds have been bred through chromosome doubling to improve the quality and size of their blossoms (Emsweller and Ruttle, 1941).

What is the importance of polyploidy in evolution?

Polyploidy, involving the presence of multiple copies of identical or similar chromosome sets in one species, is an important feature of species evolution in the plant, animal, and fungal kingdoms. Polyploidy is widely considered to be an enabling force in evolution.

What are the limitations of polyploidy in crop improvement?

Limitations of Polyploidy: Polyploidy has several limitations. Some important limitations of polyploidy in crop improvement are briefly presented below: 1. Limited Use: The single species polyploidy has limited applications. It is generally useful in those crop species which propagate asexually like banana, potato, sugarcane, grapes etc. 2.

How is polyploidy induced in plants?

Several cytological mechanisms are known to spontaneously induce polyploidy in plants (Ramsey and Schemske, 1998). One such route involves non-reduction of gametes during meiosis a process called meiotic nuclear restitution. The formed gametes (2n) contain the somatic nuclear condition of cells.

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How is polyploidy important to the field of agriculture?

Some of the most important consequences of polyploidy for plant breeding are the increment in plant organs (“gigas” effect), buffering of deleterious mutations, increased heterozygosity, and heterosis (hybrid vigor).


What is polyploidy in agriculture?

Polyploidy refers to cells the nuclei of which have three or more times the number of chromosomes found in haploid cells. This condition frequently occurs in plants and may result from chromosome duplication without division of the cytoplasm or from the union of two diploid gametes.


What advantage has polyploidy been thought to give to crop plants?

As a major force for plant evolution (Chen, 2010), polyploidy promotes better adaptation traits in crops, since polyploid plants are thought to have been selected during evolution because of their phenotypic and genomic plasticity (Leitch and Leitch, 2008).


What is polyploidy and how is it used in plants?

Introduction to Polyploidy The fusion of two or more genomes within one nucleus results in polyploidy, resulting in each cell containing more than two pairs of homologous chromosomes. Polyploidy occurs in the majority of angiosperms and is important in agricultural crops that humans depend on for survival.


How are polyploids produced in plant breeding?

Mechanisms of Polyploidy Formation Meiotic aberrations related to spindle formation, spindle function and cytokinesis have been implicated in this process (Ramsey and Schemske, 1998). The subsequent union of reduced and non-reduced gametes leads to the formation of polyploids (Acquaah, 2007; Ramsey and Schemske, 1998).


Why is polyploidy beneficial?

BOX 1. In summary, the advantages of polyploidy are caused by the ability to make better use of heterozygosity, the buffering effect of gene redundancy on mutations and, in certain cases the facilitation of reproduction through self-fertilization or asexual means.


Why do plant growers often select for polyploid plants?

Polyploidy plants are selected by plant growers for their desirable characteristics. The occurrence of one or more extra sets of all chromosomes in an organism. Cross that involves hybrids of a single trait. The heterozygous phenotype is in-between the two homozygous phenotypes.


What is polyploidy When is this condition useful?

What is polyploidy? When is this condition useful? The condition in which cells have many sets of chromosomes; it may instantly produce new plant species that are larger and stronger.


What is the role of polyploidy in plant breeding?

The polyploidy and its key role in plant breeding. … Polyploidy is a major force in the evolution of both wild and cultivated plants. Polyploid organisms often exhibit increased vigor and , in some cases, outperform their diploid relatives in several aspects


What is a polyploidy plant?

polyploidy plants are sterile, usually completely seedless, but may have vestiges of seeds (like the kind of bananas we eat do). Polyploidy plants also usually produce much larger plants than their aneuploidy counterparts do. Bigger fruits are more marketable than smaller ones.


Abstract

As an outsider to this field with modest understanding of Polyploidy and its implications to agriculture, there is little that I can add to the discussion.


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What is polyploidy in plants?

Polyploidy is common in nature and provides a major mechanism for adaptation and speciation. Approximately 50-70% of angiosperms, which include many crop plants, have undergone polyploidy during their evolutionary process (Chen et al., 2007).


How do plants form polyploids?

Several cytological mechanisms are known to spontaneously induce polyploidy in plants (Ramsey and Schemske, 1998). One such route involves non-reduction of gametes during meiosis a process called meiotic nuclear restitution. The formed gametes (2n) contain the somatic nuclear condition of cells. Meiotic aberrations related to spindle formation, spindle function and cytokinesis have been implicated in this process (Ramsey and Schemske, 1998). The subsequent union of reduced and non-reduced gametes leads to the formation of polyploids (Acquaah, 2007; Ramsey and Schemske, 1998). For example, autotetraploids may be formed in a diploid population through the union of two unreduced 2n gametes as was found in the F1 progenies of open-pollinated diploid apples (Ramsey and Schemske, 1998). Similarly, spontaneous allotetraploids were formed in 90% of F2 progenies of interspecific crosses between Digitalis ambigua and Digitalis purpurea, which are common ornamental plants (Ramsey and Schemske, 1998). Another example is the formation of autohexaploid Beta vulgaris (sugar beet) and alfalfa from cultivated autotetraploid varieties apparently from the union of reduced (2x) and unreduced (4x) gametes (Bingham, 1968; Hornsey, 1973).


How do polyploids form?

Another major route for polyploid formation is through somatic doubling of chromosomes during mitosis. In nature, the formation of polyploids as a result of mitotic aberrations has been reported in the meristematic tissue of several plant species including tomato and in non-meristematic tissues of plants such as bean (Coleman, 1950; Ramsey and Schemske, 1998). Artificial inducement of polyploids through the inhibition of mitosis is routine in plant breeding. High temperatures above 40°C have been used to induce tetraploid and octoploid corn seedlings albeit with low success of 1.8% and 0.8% respectively (Randolph, 1932). Currently, chemical mitotic inhibitory agents such as colchicine or dinitroanilines are used to induce polyploidy in crop plants. A typical example is the production of tetraploid watermelon plants for the production of seedless triploid watermelon (Compton et al., 1996).


Why are mutations important in breeding?

High frequencies of chromos ome mutations are desirable in modern breeding techniques, such as tilling, as they provide new sources of variation. The multiallelic nature of loci in polyploids has many advantages that are useful in breeding. The masking of deleterious alleles, that may arise from induced mutation, by their dominant forms cushions polyploids from lethal conditions often associated with inbred diploid crops (Gaul, 1958). This concept has been instrumental in the evolution of polyploids during bottlenecks where there is enforced inbreeding (Comai, 2005). Mutation breeding exploits the concept of gene redundancy and mutation tolerance in polyploid crop improvement in two ways. First, polyploids are able to tolerate deleterious allele modifications post-mutation, and secondly, they have increased mutation frequency because of their large genomes resulting from duplicated condition of their genes (Gaul, 1958). The high mutation frequencies observed with polyploids may be exploited when trying to induce mutations in diploid cultivars that do not produce enough genetic variation after a mutagenic treatment. This approach has been used in mutation breeding of Achimenes sp. (nut orchids) by first forming autotetraploids through colchicine treatment followed by the application of fast neutrons and X-rays. In this study, the autotetraploids were found to have 20-40 times higher mutation frequency than the corresponding diploid cultivar due to the large genome (Broertjes, 1976).


What are the changes that occur in a plant’s genome?

These may be changes in genetic composition, physiological mechanisms, structural composition and vigor. Some of these changes create the platform for the commercial exploitation of polyploids. Genetic changes following genome duplication involve the rapid loss of chromosomal segments in a process called diploidization. Diploidization describes the process by which a polyploid genome become more ‘diploid-like’ in character (Fig 5.3) (Clarkson et al., 2005; Comai, 2005; Ozkan and Feldman, 2009). It is necessary to eliminate duplicated genes in a newly formed polyploid to avoid gene silencing as well as to stabilize fertility (Chen et al., 2007; Chen, 2010; Clarkson et al., 2005; Comai, 2005). Duplicated genes that are retained often undergo subfunctionalization (complementing genes) and neofunctionalization (genes with novel functions) (Comai, 2005; Osborn et al., 2003). Diploidization has been described for many genus including Nicotina and Cucumis (Chen et al., 2007; Comai, 2005).


What is the classification of polyploids?

Polyploids may be classified based on their chromosomal composition into either euploids or aneu ploids. Euploids constitute the majority of polyploids.


How to achieve homozygosity in breeding?

Self pollination is an important method for attaining homozygosity in breeding. Through this process, it is possible to fix desired alleles in the background of a crop. In general, it takes approximately 3.80 more generations for an autotetraploid to reach the same level of homozygosity as the diploid (Dudley, 1963). Fixing a trait controlled by a single gene in an autotetraploid, would require four identical alleles to achieve homozygosity. For example, in a segregating, tetraploid F2 population the proportion of the homozygous loci would be 1:18 ( Fig 5.5).


Why is polyploidy important?

Polyploidy, involving the presence of multiple copies of identical or similar chromosome sets in one species, is an important feature of species evolution in the plant, animal, and fungal kingdoms. Polyploidy is widely considered to be an enabling force in evolution. Because chromosome sets are duplicated in polyploids, heterozygosity may be fixed, and random mutation or factors modulating gene expression may be buffered (unlike a diploid), so new genes and gene functions may evolve, leaving the original function in the other chromosome set.


What is polyploidy in biology?

Polyploidy refers to a condition in which a diploid cell or organism acquires additional sets of chromosomes. Although polyploidy is less common in mammals than in plants, polyploid cells are generated in different tissues. Polyploidy plays an essential role during normal development and could also contribute to human diseases. Polyploid cells can emerge after an abortive cell cycle (endoreplication, cytokinesis failure, Mitotic Slippage) or after cell-cell fusion. This review resumes the organization of the cell cycle and its checkpoints, and gives an overview of mechanisms producing polyploid cells at the cellular and molecular levels.


What is the base number of a polyploid?

The basic number x = 7 is the only one without polyploidy occurrence (it just contains one diploid taxon). As for x = 8, polyploid levels are only tetraploid and hexaploid. The most differentiated base number is x = 9, with ploidy levels ranging from diploid to hexaidecaploid, although not every intermediate level has been recorded. Concerning the most common, even ploidy levels, all of them but the tetraidecaploid are known, and as for the rarer, odd levels, scarce cases of triploids (2 n = 27, A. nitida Bertol., Chiarugi, 1926 —other counts in the species, 2 n = 54, Watanabe, 2002, and references therein— A. caerulescens L. var. angustifolia DC., Kawatani and Ohno, 1964 ), pentaploids (2 n = 45, A. caerulescens var. angustifolia, Kawatani and Ohno, 1964) and heptaploids (2 n = 63, A. negrei, Ouyahya and Viano, 1981, 1988) have been reported. In addition, as already stated, a polyploid base number exists, x = 17, comprising tetraploid taxa. Summarising, 2 x, 3 x, 4 x, 5 x, 6 x, 7 x, 8 x, 10 x, 12 x and 16 x taxa have been found in the genus. Apart from odd levels, 12 x and 16 x (with only two and one known representatives, respectively; Malakhova, 1990; Pellicer et al., 2007, 2010b) are the rarest ones ( Fig. 7 ).


What percentage of speciation events are polyploidy?

Estimates of the proportion of speciation events that involve polyploidy, however, are less than 10% . Botanists generally agree that more speciation events occur by allopolyploidy than by autopolyploidy, but recent studies have shown this to be a more complex issue.


How many chromosomes are in an aneuploidy?

Aneuploidy is defined as the gain or loss of one or more chromosomes from the normal 2N chromosome number ( Nath and Krishna, 1997 ). For example, children born with Down syndrome typically have 47 chromosomes (2N +1, with three copies of chromosome 21 instead of two).


When do polyploid cells emerge?

Polyploid cells can emerge after an abortive cell cycle (endoreplication, cytokinesis failure, Mitotic Slippage) or after cell-cell fusion. This review resumes the organization of the cell cycle and its checkpoints, and gives an overview of mechanisms producing polyploid cells at the cellular and molecular levels.


Why do chromosomes evolve in polyploids?

Because chromosome sets are duplicated in polyploids, heterozygosity may be fixed, and random mutation or factors modulating gene expression may be buffered (unlike a diploid), so new genes and gene functions may evolve, leaving the original function in the other chromosome set.


Why is polyploidy important?

Polyploidy plays an important role in crop improvement. Both autopolyploidy and allopolyploidy are useful in several ways. However, allopolyploidy has wider applications than autopolyploidy.


What is the term for a polyploid that originates from a single chromosome?

Polyploids which originate by multiplication of the chromosome of a single species are known as autopolyploids or autoploids and such situation is referred to as autopolyploidy. In other words, autoploidy refers to the situation in which additional sets of chromosomes arise from the same species.


What are the three types of autoploids?

Autoploids include triploids (3x), tetraploids (4x), pentaploids (5x), hexaploids (6x), septaploids (7x), octaploids (8x), and so on. Autoploids are also known as simple polyploids or single species polyploids. i. Autotriploids: They have three sets of chromosomes of the same species.


How many chromosomes are in a triploid?

They have three sets of chromosomes of the same species. They can occur naturally or can be produced artificially by crossing between autotetraploid and diploid species. Triploids are generally highly sterile due to defective gamete formation. Triploids are useful only in those plant species which propagate asexually like banana, sugarcane, apple etc.


What is it called when an organism has more than two sets of chromosomes?

An organism or individual having more than two basic or monoploid sets of chromosomes is called polyploid and such condition is known as polyploidy. It is estimated that about one third species of flowering plants are polyploids. In wild species of grass family polyploidy has been reported upto 70%.


How many copies of the genome of the same species are there?

They have four copies of the genome of same species. They may arise spontaneously or can be induced artificially by doubling the chromosomes of a diploid species with colchicine treatment. Tetraploids are usually very stable and fertile because pairing partners are available during meiosis.


Which is better, alfalfa or diploid?

Tetraploid varieties of alfalfa are better than diploid in yield and have better recovery after grazing.

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