How to become a precision agriculture technician

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Precision Agriculture Technicians typically need an associate’s degree in biology, animal science, or a related field. Some positions may require a bachelor’s degree. You may need some previous work-related skill, knowledge or experience to be a Precision Agriculture Technician.

Required Education

Individuals will need a bachelor’s degree in agronomy, agricultural business, or a related field to work as a precision agricultural technician. A strong background in data management may be beneficial.Jan 13, 2022

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Answer

What does a precision agriculture technician do?

Precision agricultural technicians use technology to assist with farming. They use geographic information systems (GIS) and other systems to help locate pests and identify other potential issues that can affect crop production. They can also use various forms of technology to assess soil conditions.

What does an agriculture technician do?

Other tasks include:

  • Measure or weigh ingredients used in laboratory testing.
  • Prepare data summaries, reports, or analyses that include results, charts, or graphs to document research findings and results.
  • Perform crop production duties, such as tilling, hoeing, pruning, weeding, or harvesting crops.
  • Set up laboratory or field equipment as required for site testing.

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What can precision agriculture do for You?

Precision agriculture can actively contribute to food security and safety. Producing more agricultural food crops with lesser input with precision agriculture technologies compared to traditional methods has reduced food insecurity. Such technologies make farming transparent by improving record keeping, food traceability and documentation.

What is a precision ag specialist?

What you will do:

  • Sale and Service of GPS and GIS systems partnering with area sales staff.
  • Utilize communication skills to show the benefits and technical aspects of precision ag tools and how they can be incorporated into the Nutrien Precision Ag Platform.
  • Must function as a team leader to openly work with entire sales staff and deliver what is promised.

More items…

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How do you get into precision agriculture?

Become a precision agriculture specialist requires you have formal qualifications and education, typically at least a bachelor’s degree in agricultural technologies, agronomy, or a related field. Prior sales experience can be a bonus, as sales skills can help you build and maintain customer relationships.


What is a precision ag technician?

A precision agriculture technician uses technology in a variety of ways to make growing crops more precise. They use data analysis, through many technologies and maps, to improve the efficiency and precision of agricultural growth pertaining to items such as soil, irrigation, fertilization, and pest control.


What can you do with a precision ag degree?

Students completing a certificate or degree program in Precision Ag will be more competent in their own farm operations or obtain positions such as Precision Ag Technicians (implement dealers), Crop Specialists, Nutrient Management Specialists, Precision Ag Department Managers, Precision Agronomists, and Precision …


What does a precision ag specialist do?

Precision Agriculture Specialists provide support and technical assistance to growers who are using precision technologies on their farms. They implement actual work of grid and contour differential global positioning systems for soil sampling as well as developing informational and recommendation maps.


What percentage of careers in Agriscience require college degree?

About 20 percent of the careers in agriscience require college degrees.


What skills do you need for farming?

Key farmer skills include problem-solving, interpersonal, farm management and organizational skills. You can use these skills to use in a variety of ways, from communicating with farmhands to tending crops and repairing machinery.


Precision Agriculture Technicians

Precision Agriculture Technicians apply geospatial technologies, including geographic information systems (GIS) and Global Positioning System (GPS), to agricultural production or management activities, such as pest scouting, site-specific pesticide application, yield mapping, or variable-rate irrigation.


What degree do you need

We did a survey to ask other Precision Agriculture Technicians what degree they had when they became a Precision Agriculture Technician. Here are the results.


How hard is it

You may need some previous work-related skill, knowledge or experience to be a Precision Agriculture Technician. For example, an electrician must complete three or four years of apprenticeship or several years of vocational training, and often must have passed a licensing exam, in order to perform the job.


Skills required

We asked other Precision Agriculture Technicians if they could only have 5 skills, what would they be. Here is what they said.


Knowledge required

Just like any other job, you will need certain know-hows to excel at your job. Precision Agriculture Technicians are generally very knowledgeable in these 5 key areas.


What degree do I need to become a precision agriculture technician?

To become a precision agriculture technician, most job positions require a bachelor’s degree. According to O*NET OnLine, almost 60% have a bachelor’s degree with a little over 10% having continued their education to earn a master’s degree. Though most jobs require a bachelor’s, 11% of technicians surveyed held an associate’s degree.


Why do precision agriculture technicians analyze data?

They also collect and analyze data, to reduce “the negative impacts of weather” that could effect the yielding of crops. Precision Agriculture Technicians also analyze drainage and topography and this allows for more efficient in irrigation.


What degree do I need to become a tech?

Though most jobs require a bachelor’s, 11% of technicians surveyed held an associate’s degree. This career field also requires a variety of skills and knowledge that you would gain through experience, on-the-job training, or by attending a trade program at a college.


How is precision agriculture done?

Precision agriculture is done by analyzing soil samples, determining types of pests and their movements, making more efficient fertilization and irrigation of crops to lesson waste and to produce the best yielding crops for fields. They analyze and create maps that show the how much each crop is producing.


Is precision agriculture a green job?

The precision agriculture technician career is considered a green occupation due to its application of precision agriculture in order to according to onetonline.org “specifically reduce the negative environmental impacts of farming practices.”. They should have skills in active listening, critical thinking, decision making, and systems analysis.


COURSE LIST

Course list for reference only. Current students please refer to your individualized program plan or see your advisor.


Occupational Specific (30 Credits)

Prepares students to recognize and implement basic crop production management techniques for corn, soybeans, alfalfa, small grains and general forages used on Wisconsin farms. Field preparation, fertility, seed selection, planting and in-season management of specific crops will be emphasized.


Precision Agriculture Technicians

Precision Agriculture Technicians apply geospatial technologies, including geographic information systems (GIS) and Global Positioning System (GPS), to agricultural production or management activities, such as pest scouting, site-specific pesticide application, yield mapping, or variable-rate irrigation.


Job description

Precision Agriculture Technicians apply geospatial technologies, including geographic information systems (GIS) and Global Positioning System (GPS), to agricultural production or management activities, such as pest scouting, site-specific pesticide application, yield mapping, or variable-rate irrigation.


Salary

Precision Agriculture Technicians with little to no experience tend to make between $29830 and $37940 while the more experienced ones can earn over $63340 per year.


Requirements

We asked other Precision Agriculture Technicians what degree they had when they got the job and most of them said they had a Bachelor’s Degree followed by an Associate’s Degree.


Pros and Cons

Here are some of the pros and cons of being a Precision Agriculture Technician.


What is the job like

69% of Precision Agriculture Technicians said they were satisfied with their job and 65% said they feel like their job is making other people’s lives better.


What is a Precision Agriculture Specialist

There is more than meets the eye when it comes to being a Precision Agriculture Specialist. For example, did you know that they make an average of $27.16 an hour? That’s $56,503 a year!


Average Salary for a Precision Agriculture Specialist

Precision Agriculture Specialists in America make an average salary of $56,503 per year or $27 per hour. The top 10 percent makes over $85,000 per year, while the bottom 10 percent under $37,000 per year.


Top Skills For a Precision Agriculture Specialist

The skills section on your resume can be almost as important as the experience section, so you want it to be an accurate portrayal of what you can do. Luckily, we’ve found all of the skills you’ll need so even if you don’t have these skills yet, you know what you need to work on.


How Do Precision Agriculture Specialist Rate Their Jobs?

Rate how you like work as Precision Agriculture Specialist. It’s anonymous and will only take a minute.


What Does a Precision Agriculture Specialist Do?

A precision agriculture specialist works with growers to assist with technical precision equipment. The equipment you work with includes mapping equipment and software that indicate ideal soil locations, global positioning systems for soil sample and growing recommendations, and satellite equipment that delineates relevant variations in the land.


How to Become a Precision Agriculture Specialist

Become a precision agriculture specialist requires you have formal qualifications and education, typically at least a bachelor’s degree in agricultural technologies, agronomy, or a related field. Prior sales experience can be a bonus, as sales skills can help you build and maintain customer relationships.

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