What agriculture does china have

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In 2018:

  • It was the 2nd largest producer of maize (257.1 million tons), second only to the USA;
  • It was the largest producer of rice (212.1 million tons);
  • It was the largest producer of wheat (131.4 million tons);
  • It was the 3rd largest producer of sugarcane (108 million tons), second only to Brazil and India;

More items…

China primarily produces rice, wheat, potatoes, tomato, sorghum, peanuts, tea, millet, barley, cotton, oilseed, corn and soybeans.

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Answer

What are the chief agricultural products in China?

In 2018:

  • It was the 2nd largest producer of maize (257.1 million tons), second only to the USA;
  • It was the largest producer of rice (212.1 million tons);
  • It was the largest producer of wheat (131.4 million tons);
  • It was the 3rd largest producer of sugarcane (108 million tons), second only to Brazil and India;

More items…

What are the top five agricultural products of China?

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Where does most agriculture occur in China?

Wheat is the second most-prevalent grain crop, grown in most parts of the country but especially on the North China Plain, the Wei and Fen River valleys on the Loess plateau, and in Jiangsu, Hubei, and Sichuan provinces. Corn and millet are grown in north and northeast China, and oats are important in Inner Mongolia and Tibet .

What is the importance of Agriculture in China?

Peiligang is one of the earliest village ruins in China, dating back about 8,000 years. It provides important evidence for studies on the origin and development of agriculture, pottery making, the textile industry as well as alcohol making techniques in …

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What are China’s main agricultural products?

Rice, maize and wheat are the three major crops, and the production of these three crops accounts for more than 90% of China’s total food production.


What are the main agricultural areas in China?

The three regions in China discussed are the North-Eastern Plain, the Northern China Plain and the Middle and Lower Yangtze plain. These are centers of corn, wheat and Rice, respectively.


What agricultural products does China lead the world in producing?

This makes China the biggest peanut, rice and wheat producer in the world and the second-biggest producer of corn behind the United States and of cotton behind India.


What is China’s biggest crop?

RiceRice, China’s most important crop, is dominant in the southern provinces, many of which yield two harvests per year.


What is China known for producing?

Today, China is the world’s largest manufacturing powerhouse: It produces nearly 50 percent of the world’s major industrial goods, including crude steel (800 percent of the U.S. level and 50 percent of global supply), cement (60 percent of the world’s production), coal (50 percent of the world’s production), vehicles ( …


Does China have good agriculture?

Currently, China ranks first in the world in terms of the production of cereals, cotton, fruit, vegetables, meat, poultry, eggs and fishery products. Thanks to the great importance attached to opening agriculture to the outside world, China has increasingly closer links with other countries in this field.


What is China’s biggest food import?

China’s demand for soybeans has skyrocketed in recent years, in large part because the crop is an important source of animal feed for livestock. From 2000 to 2018, Chinese soybean imports grew from $2.3 billion to nearly $38.1 billion,3 leaving China as the world’s largest importer of the legume, by a wide margin.


What is China the world’s largest producer of?

Indeed, China is the world’s biggest producer of BOTH wind and solar energy—bet you didn’t know that! But the real reason is coal. China is by far the world’s biggest coal producer, accounting for nearly half of global production.


History Before 1949

  • Ancient history
    Wheat likely “appeared in the lower Yellow River around 2600 Before Common Era (BCE), followed by Gansu and Xinjiang around 1900 BCE and finally occurred in the middle Yellow River and Tibet regions by 1600 BCE”.
  • Ming era, 1368 to 1644 A.D.
    The population doubled as new lands were settled in Fujian, Guangzhou, and Guangxi provinces, new crops were introduced, and irrigation systems were improved.The mountainous areas in southeastern China were developed in the Ming-Qing period by migrants from overcrowded area…

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Since 1949

  • Since 1949 China’s political leaders have tried a variety of large-scale social experiments to boost agricultural production. First, a massive land reform program eliminated landlords and gave land to those who farmed it. Next, farm families were progressively organized into cooperatives, collectives, and finally people’s communes. After more than twenty-five years of experience wit…

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Reform of The Agricultural Economy in The 1980s

  • In the late 1980s, China remained a predominantly agricultural country. As of 1985 about 63% [percent] of the population lived in rural areas, and nearly 63 percent of the national labor force was engaged in agriculture (see Migration in China). Modern technology had spread slowly in the vast farm areas, and the availability of modern supplies was less than adequate, causing growt…

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Resources Endowment

  • Arable land in China was particularly scarce; little more than 10 percent of the total land area, most of it in the eastern third of the country, can be cultivated. This compares with more than 20 percent for the continental United States, which is around the same size as China, despite having one billion fewer people. Further agricultural expansion was relatively difficult because almost n…

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Agricultural Policies

  • Agricultural policy has gone through three broad phases: the 1950s, when agriculture was collectivized, ending with the Great Leap Forward (1958–60); the period from 1961 to the death of Mao Zedong in 1976, when more agricultural progress came to depend on the supply of capital and modern inputs; and the period under the post-Mao leadership, which has been characterize…

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Planning and Organization

  • The state’s role in the mid-1980s was chiefly to plan production and manage resources. Among state institutions at the national level, the Ministry of Agriculture, Animal Husbandry, and Fishery was primarily responsible for coordinating agricultural programs. Other central bodies of importance in agricultural policy matters included the State Economic Commission; the State Pl…

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Operational Methods and Inputs

  • China’s farmers have long used techniques such as fertilization and irrigation to increase the productivity of their scarce land. Over time, many farming techniques have been modernized: chemical fertilizers have supplemented organic fertilizers, and mechanical pumps have come into use in irrigation. Government planners in the 1980s emphasized increased use of fertilizer, impr…

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Production

  • Five economic activities generated the bulk of agricultural output: crops, livestock, forestry, fishery, and sideline production (rural industry). Crop raising was the dominant activity, generating as much as 80 percent of the total value of output in the mid-1950s. The policy of stressing crop output was relaxed in the early 1980s, and by 1985 this figure fell to about 50 percent. The prop…

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Agricultural Trade

  • Since 1949 agricultural exports for most years exceeded agricultural imports. China’s officials used this export surplus as an important source for financing the importation of high-priority industrial items. Agricultural exports rose through the years but have not grown as fast as industrial exports. In 1970, for example, agricultural exports accounted for 45 percent of total ex…

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See Also


Agriculture Without Waste

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In his book ‘Farmers of Forty Centuries’, the American agronomist F.H. King describes many successful cases of traditional Chinese agricultural practices. The key to 4,000 years of land fertility was the practice of “an agriculture without waste” with no use of external inputs. This agricultural system was characterised …

See more on iied.org


Learning from Regional Examples

  • The eight case studies were drawn from seven regions all over China, and feature a variety of different operational models. One of these features Shared Harvest, a community supported agriculture (CSA) enterprise with 460 members, founded in 2011 and headquartered on the outskirts of Beijing. Shared Harvest was started by two PhD researchers from urban areas with …

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Challenges from Within and Without

  • While both Shared Harvest and Wanzai County can be considered successful examples of sustainable farming, the sector faces many problems. One is the reluctance of the central government to promote any agricultural approaches which might decrease production, even if they bring environmental benefits and increased incomes to farmers. Food security remains the …

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