What are examples of intensive agriculture

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Examples of intensive agriculture

  • Massive monocultures . Like wheat, corn and barley crops in the North American plains, or soy in Argentina, it is a highly profitable monoculture for both domestic consumption and export, …
  • Greenhouse agriculture. It is called greenhouse to closed places and controlled climatic conditions, usually transparent to allow the entry of sunlight but prevent the dispersion of heat. …
  • Hydroponic agriculture. In her mineral solutions are used to cultivate the plants, instead of soil properly. …
  • Irrigated agriculture. By using automated irrigation systems, moisture levels are maintained that are conducive to the cultivation of a few plant variants, thus making it possible to constantly supply these …
  • Commercial floral crops . The flower industry also has its intensive variant, through vast rose gardens, sunflower plantations or other highly sought-after flowers, both for aesthetic arrangements and for perfumery …
What Are the Characteristics of Intensive Agriculture?
  • Pasture Intensification. …
  • Rotational Grazing. …
  • Concentrated Animal Feeding Operations (CAFOs) …
  • Crop Irrigation. …
  • Genetically Modified Organism (GMO) Seeds. …
  • Use of Agrochemicals. …
  • Livestock. …
  • Aquaculture.
Dec 14, 2021

What are the types of intensive farming?

Examples of intensive agriculture

  • Greenhouse agriculture. It is called greenhouse to closed places and controlled climatic conditions, usually transparent to allow the entry of sunlight but prevent the dispersion of heat.
  • Hydroponic agriculture. In her mineral solutions are used to cultivate the plants, instead of soil properly. …
  • Irrigated agriculture. …

What are the examples of intensive subsistence agriculture?

Subsistence agriculture: characteristics, types and examples

  • Content: The subsistence farming It is a form of agriculture in which almost all crops are used to support the farmer and the farmer’s family, leaving little or no surplus …
  • characteristics. …
  • Crops intended mainly for own consumption. …
  • Low capital endowment. …
  • Absence of new technologies. …
  • Types
  • Migratory agriculture. …
  • Primitive agriculture. …

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What agricultural crops are the most labour intensive?

  • Is it labor efficient? …
  • Does the intense work for this crop come in at a less-busy time of year?
  • Is this crop fast-maturing? …
  • Is it high yielding for the space occupied (does it produce one vegetable head or 1 pound of produce, per square foot or1/2 pound/row foot)?
  • Is it high yielding for the labor intensiveness? …

More items…

What is an example of intensive farming?

Types Of Intensive Farming

  • Livestock. The term livestock refers to those individual animals who have no choice but to endure life on farms.
  • Crops. Monocropping is a defining feature of intensive plant agriculture. …
  • Aquaculture. …
  • Sustainability. …
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What is an example of extensive agriculture?

Extensive farming most commonly means raising sheep and cattle in areas with low agricultural productivity, but includes large-scale growing of wheat, barley, cooking oils and other grain crops in areas like the Murray-Darling Basin in Australia.


What is the best example of intensive subsistence agriculture?

There are two types of the intensive subsistence agriculture. One is dominated by wet paddy and the other is dominated by crops other than paddy, e.g., wheat, pulses, maize, millets, sorghum, kaoling, soya-beans, tubers and vegetables.


What are three types of extensive agriculture?

Intensive = market gardening, mixed crop/livestock, plantation agriculture.Extensive = nomadic herding, ranching, shifting cultivation.


Is rice intensive or extensive?

Intensive Farming ExtensiveIntensive vs Extensive FarmingIntensive FarmingExtensive FarmingIt requires large output per hectareIt requires small output per hectareThe main crop of intensive farming is rice, wheat and others.The main crop of Extensive farming is sugarcane and more.2 more rows•Mar 9, 2022


What is intensive farming?

Intensive farming is an agricultural intensification and mechanization system that aims to maximize yields from available land through various means, such as heavy use of pesticides and chemical fertilizers.


Is plantation farming intensive?

In many of the poor developing nations in the tropical regions of the world, plantation agriculture has increasingly replaced subsistence horticulture. Plantations are large, labor-intensive farms that mostly produce fruit, sugar, fiber, or vegetable oil products for the international market.


Is livestock intensive or extensive?

Intensive livestock is based on livestock farming in small areas. For this, more advanced technologies and techniques are used, as well as genetic manipulation and artificial insemination. Extensive livestock farming is about raising animals in larger areas and grazing.


Is ranching intensive or extensive?

Ranching is the act of running a ranch, which is essentially an extensive farm for the sole purpose of raising livestock and crops. Ranches are usually owned by a single family, and the raising and harvesting of livestock and crops constitute its livelihood.


What are some examples of intensive agriculture?

Examples of intensive agriculture 1 Massive monocultures . Like wheat, corn and barley crops in the North American plains, or soy in Argentina, it is a highly profitable monoculture for both domestic consumption and export, and despite being highly mechanized, they cause environmental damage and they impoverish the species by always preferring bio-engineered seeds and using agro-toxins (fertilizers, pesticides, etc.). 2 Greenhouse agriculture. It is called greenhouse to closed places and controlled climatic conditions, usually transparent to allow the entry of sunlight but prevent the dispersion of heat. They are widely used for the intensive cultivation of certain plant species, taking advantage of the simulated climate to boost their productivity. 3 Hydroponic agriculture. In her mineral solutions are used to cultivate the plants, instead of soil properly. Sometimes an inert material is used as support for the plants, other times directly for the water, in which the substances necessary for plant growth are poured. 4 Irrigated agriculture. By using automated irrigation systems, moisture levels are maintained that are conducive to the cultivation of a few plant variants, thus making it possible to constantly supply these foods without the need to coordinate the seasons of rain and drought. 5 Commercial floral crops . The flower industry also has its intensive variant, through vast rose gardens, sunflower plantations or other highly sought-after flowers, both for aesthetic arrangements and for perfumery work. This includes aromatic crops, such as lavender, which require constant preparation of soils to speed flowering and pests to prevent spoilage.


What is the difference between intensive and extensive production?

The main difference has to do with production, which is much greater in the intensive than in the extensive, although it is also the impacts on the environment and on the nature of the products obtained .


What is subsistence farming?

An example perhaps a bit extreme, since the crop, conuco or family garden provides just enough for a family to subsist and change or sell the surplus with their neighbors. It is perhaps the agricultural point furthest from the needs of the world food market and therefore does not require almost technological intervention or inputs.


What is hydroponic agriculture?

Hydroponic agriculture. In her mineral solutions are used to cultivate the plants, instead of soil properly. Sometimes an inert material is used as support for the plants, other times directly for the water, in which the substances necessary for plant growth are poured.


What are the challenges of agriculture?

Agriculture faces in modern times great challenges in terms of ecology, sustainability, and quantity of production, compared to a human population that continues to grow year after year. And from these considerations come the opposite concepts of intensive agriculture and extensive agriculture.


What is organic farming?

These are variants of extensive agriculture whose purpose is to dispense with all types of contaminants and machinery, betting on products as natural as possible, which instead of volume offer food quality to the market.


What is greenhouse agriculture?

It is called greenhouse to closed places and controlled climatic conditions, usually transparent to allow the entry of sunlight but prevent the dispersion of heat. They are widely used for the intensive cultivation of certain plant species, taking advantage of the simulated climate to boost their productivity.


What is extensive agriculture?

Intensive and extensive agriculture stands in opposition to one another in many ways. Extensive farming refers to systems that use relatively small amounts of inputs, such as human labor, machinery such as tractors, and investment. Fewer inputs are needed to produce yields, since extensive agriculture tends to make use of naturally-occurring resources, such as fertile soil. Pastoral production, where animals are grazed outdoors for their entire lives or are tended to by nomadic farmers – is a type of extensive agriculture, as are operations that favor greater plant and crop diversity.


How can intensive agriculture be sustainable?

However, one of the most effective and immediate steps that can be taken towards sustainability is for people to curtail the consumption of animal products since these are the most polluting, resource-intensive, and cruelest forms of agriculture. Particularly those in wealthy nations like the United States and New Zealand – two of the highest per-capita consumers of meat – ought to decrease animal product consumption, since consuming animal products can produce negative health outcomes like cardiovascular disease.


What is monocropping in agriculture?

Monocropping is a defining feature of intensive plant agriculture. Large areas of land are planted with a single species, such as wheat, corn, or soy, with the latter two used heavily in animal feed. The use of synthetic fertilizers allow crops to be grown year after year on soil that becomes more depleted as time goes on; because time is money, fields are not allowed to go fallow, which would allow the soil to naturally replenish the nutrients plants require.


Why are intensive agriculture corporations vertically integrated?

In the United States, intensive agriculture corporations tend to be vertically integrated, freeing them from setting prices for their products that are determined by supply and demand , such as traditional farmers are forced to. This enables intensive operations to undercut smaller farms and eventually force them out of the market. Combined with the significant financial and political cloud multinational agricultural corporations have, fewer traditional farmers than ever are able to compete.


How long do pigs live in the wild?

In the wild, pigs can live upwards of 20 years. Intensive agriculture aims to grow animals as fast as possible in as short a time as possible since it is costly to provide feed.


What are the most effective steps towards sustainability?

However, one of the most effective and immediate steps that can be taken towards sustainability is for people to curtail the consumption of animal products since these are the most polluting, resource-intensive, and cruelest forms of agriculture.


How does agriculture affect the environment?

One of the most troubling environmental disadvantages to industrial agriculture is its contributions to climate change. Globally, agriculture is one of the largest drivers of anthropogenic climate change, accounting for around twelve percent of total emissions, and nearly a quarter of greenhouse gas emissions. Industrial crop production hampers the ability of soil to act as a carbon sequester, ultimately turning it into a carbon emitter. Animal agriculture (most of which is raised intensively) accounts for large amounts of greenhouse gas emissions, including 37% of all methane emissions and 65% of nitrous oxide.


Why is intensive agriculture important?

On the level of theory, the increased productivity of intensive agriculture enables the farmer to use a relatively smaller land area that is located close to market, where land values are high relative to labour and capital , and this is true in many parts of the world.


What is extensive agriculture?

extensive agriculture, in agricultural economics, system of crop cultivation using small amounts of labour and capital in relation to area of land being farmed. The crop yield in extensive agriculture depends primarily on the natural fertility of the soil, the terrain, the climate, and the…


Why is intensive farming better than extensive farming?

Optimal use of these materials and machines produces significantly greater crop yields per unit of land than extensive agriculture, which uses little capital or labour. As a result, a farm using intensive agriculture will require less land than an extensive agriculture farm to produce a similar profit. In practice, however, the increased economies and efficiencies of intensive agriculture often encourage farm operators to work very large tracts in order to keep their capital investments in machinery productively engaged— i.e., busy.


Why do intensive farms require less land?

As a result, a farm using intensive agriculture will require less land than an extensive agriculture farm to produce a similar profit. In practice, however, the increased economies and efficiencies of intensive agriculture often encourage farm operators to work very large tracts in order to keep their capital investments in machinery productively …


Do farmers use intensive farming?

However, in practice many relatively small-scale farmers employ some combination of intensive and extensive agriculture, and many of these operate relatively close to markets. Many large-scale farm operators, especially in such relatively vast and agriculturally advanced nations as Canada and the United States, practice intensive agriculture in areas where land values are relatively low, and at great distances from markets, and farm enormous tracts of land with high yields. However, in such societies overproduction (beyond market demands) often results in diminished profit as a result of depressed prices.

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