What are the effects of climate change on agriculture

image

Climate change can disrupt food availability, reduce access to food, and affect food quality. For example, projected increases in temperatures, changes in precipitation patterns, changes in extreme weather events, and reductions in water availability may all result in reduced agricultural productivity.Oct 6, 2016


How does climate change affect agriculture?

Agriculture emits an estimated 10.5 percent of total U.S. greenhouse gases; however, agriculture also provides opportunities to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and remove carbon dioxide from the atmosphere.


How does climate change affect agriculture essay?

Climate change is affecting agriculture by interfering with the efficiency of crop production. Agriculture is facing droughts, flooding, sea level elevations, natural disasters, and health hazards for employees. All of these exponents lead to crop failure that creates famines and food prices to rise.


How does climate change affect agriculture in India?

Agriculture sector in India is vulnerable to climate change. Higher temperatures tend to reduce crop yields and favour weed and pest proliferation. Climate change can have negative effects on irrigated crop yields across agro-ecological regions both due to temperature rise and changes in water availability.


How does climate change affect agriculture in the Philippines?

“Due to climate change, crop yields are expected to decline by 25 per cent in tropical countries like the Philippines. Catches of main fish species are also expected to decline by 40 per cent,” Fernandez said during the 5th Farm Tourism Convention in Iloilo City, Philippines early this month.


Overview

Image
Agriculture is an important sector of the U.S. economy. The crops, livestock, and seafood produced in the United States contribute more than $300 billion to the economy each year.When food-service and other agriculture-related industries are included, the agricultural and food sectors contribute more than $750 billion to the gross domestic product. Agriculture and fisheries are highly depend…

See more on 19january2017snapshot.epa.gov


Impacts on Crops

  • Despite technological improvements that increase corn yields, extreme weather events have caused significant yield reductions in some years. Source: USGCRP (2009) Click the image to view a larger version. Crops grown in the United States are critical for the food supply here and around the world. U.S. farms supply nearly 25% of all grains (such as wheat, corn, and rice) on the global market. Changes in temperature, atmospheric carbon dioxid…

See more on 19january2017snapshot.epa.gov


Impacts on Livestock

  • Livestock locations in the continental United States. Source: USGCRP (2016) Click the image to view a larger version.Americans consume more than 36 million metric tons of meat and poultry annually. Livestock and poultry account for over half of U.S. agricultural cash receipts, often over $100 billion per year.Changes in climate could affect animals both directly and indirectly. 1. Heat waves, which are projected to increase under climate change, …

See more on 19january2017snapshot.epa.gov


Impacts on Fisheries

  • American fishermen catch or harvest five million metric tons of fish and shellfish each year. U.S. fisheries contribute more than $1.55 billion to the economy annually (as of 2012).Many fisheries already face multiple stresses, including overfishing and water pollution. Climate change may worsen these stresses. In particular, temperature changes could lead to significant impacts. This map shows the annual centers of biomass for thre…

See more on 19january2017snapshot.epa.gov


International Impacts

  • Climate change is very likely to affect food security at the global, regional, and local level. Climate change can disrupt food availability, reduce access to food, and affect food quality.For example, projected increases in temperatures, changes in precipitation patterns, changes in extreme weather events, and reductions in water availability may …

See more on 19january2017snapshot.epa.gov

Leave a Comment