What are the results of the agricultural revolution

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The agricultural revolution had a variety of consequences for humans. It has been linked to everything from societal inequality —a result of humans’ increased dependence on the land and fears of scarcity—to a decline in nutrition and a rise in infectious diseases contracted from domesticated animals.

The agricultural revolution had a variety of consequences for humans. It has been linked to everything from societal inequality—a result of humans’ increased dependence on the land and fears of scarcity—to a decline in nutrition and a rise in infectious diseases contracted from domesticated animals.Apr 5, 2019

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What could develop as a result of the Agricultural Revolution?

They now could produce a constant food supply. This allowed the population to grow at a faster rate. Nomads gave up their way of life and began living in settled communities. Some historians consider the Agricultural Revolution the most important event in human history. Widespread Farming

What caused the Agricultural Revolution?

What was the main cause of the agrarian revolution? Enclosure, or the process that ended traditional rights on common land formerly held in the open field system and restricted the use of land to the owner, is one of the causes of the Agricultural Revolution and a key factor behind the labor migration from rural areas to gradually industrializing cities.

Was the Agricultural Revolution good or bad?

Agricultural Revolution. The agricultural revolution in which weed science played a role also achieved other things that are not regarded as equally good: rapid consolidation of farms and food companies, increasing damage from externalized costs1. From: A History of Weed Science in the United States, 2010.

How did agricultural revolution change lives?

How did agricultural revolution change people’s lives? The Agricultural Revolution was also instrumental in the early development of cities. Because fewer workers were needed on the farms, and there was sufficient agricultural production to support life away from the farm, people were now able to move off of the farms and into cities.

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What are 3 results of the Agricultural Revolution?

This transition included going from hand production methods to machines, new chemical manufacturing and iron production processes, improved efficiency of water power, the increasing use of steam power, the development of machine tools and the rise of the factory system.


Which of the following was a result of the Agricultural Revolution?

Which of the following was a result of the agricultural revolution? Many small farmers became tenant farmers or moved to cities, enclosures became landmarks of wealthy landowners, landowners experimented with new agricultural methods.


What were the positive effects of the Agricultural Revolution?

The Agricultural Revolution brought about experimentation with new crops and new methods of crop rotation. These new farming techniques gave soil time to replenish nutrients leading to stronger crops and better agricultural output. Advancements in irrigation and drainage further increased productivity.


What are the positive and negative effects of the Agricultural Revolution?

– Positive: There are more people because there is enough food. More ideas can be created and the population can become more diverse. – Negative: More competition for space and resources.


What was the result of these changes in agriculture in England?

Doc 8 – These four changes enabled England to industrialize more easily because enclosures allowed large farms to operate without the interference of peasant needs, four year rotation of crops allowed each part of the land to be utilized every year in a different way, new crops provided cheap sources of food for both …


What was a major consequence of the Agricultural Revolution quizlet?

In what way did the Agricultural Revolution pave the way for the Industrial Revolution? it led to population growth. it increased food supplies. it caused farmers to lose and seek other work.


How did agriculture impact society?

When early humans began farming, they were able to produce enough food that they no longer had to migrate to their food source. This meant they could build permanent structures, and develop villages, towns, and eventually even cities. Closely connected to the rise of settled societies was an increase in population.


What major effects did the Agricultural Revolution have on the environment?

Due to the needs of agriculture, many forests and grasslands were mostly burned, which in combination with poor cultivation led to the disruption of the soil structure, and it was no longer fertile.


What were the immediate and long term effects of the Agricultural Revolution?

What were the immediate and long-term effects of the agricultural revolution that occurred in the 1700s? Immediate effects: Increased crop fields, more efficient farming, decreased demand for farm lands.


Was the Agricultural Revolution good or bad?

“The Agricultural Revolution certainly enlarged the sum total of food at the disposal of humankind, but the extra food did not translate into a better diet or more leisure. Rather, it translated into population explosions and pampered elites.


What are some pros and cons of the Industrial Revolution?

The Rise of the Machines: Pros and Cons of the Industrial…Pro: Goods Became More Affordable and More Accessible. … Pro: The Rapid Evolution of Labor-Saving Inventions. … Pro: The Rapid Evolution of Medicine. … Pro: Enhanced Wealth and Quality of Life of the Average Person. … Pro: The Rise of Specialist Professions.More items…


What were the positive effects of the Industrial Revolution?

Despite all these ills, the Industrial Revolution had positive effects, such as creating economic growth and making goods more available. It also helped lead to the rise of a prosperous middle class that grabbed some of the economic power once held by aristocrats, and led to the rise of specialized jobs in industry.


What was the agricultural revolution?

The Agricultural Revolution was a period of technological improvement and increased crop productivity that occurred during the 18th and early 19th centuries in Europe. In this lesson, learn the timeline, causes, effects and major inventions that spurred this shift in production. Create an account.


What were the factors that contributed to the agricultural revolution?

The increased agricultural production of the 18th century can be traced to four interrelated factors: The increased availability of farmland. A favorable climate.


How did crop rotation and livestock utilization affect society?

New patterns of crop rotation and livestock utilization paved the way for better crop yields, a greater diversity of wheat and vegetables and the ability to support more livestock . These changes impacted society as the population became better nourished and healthier.


How did the boost in livestock affect the diet of much of Europe?

Not only were Europeans consuming more meat, but the livestock was producing much needed fertilizer for crops. The addition of fertilizer allowed an improved production rate per acre.


What did Charles Townshend use to plant his own farm?

Tull also maintained that one should use a hoe to break up the soil and allow air and moisture in. Charles Townshend used the four-field system on his own land. Testing the system on his own farm, he planted wheat in the first field, clover in the second, oats in the third and turnips in the fourth.


Why were turnips important to farmers?

The cultivation of turnips was important because they could be left in the ground through the winter.


What crops were introduced to Europe in 1750?

During this time, new crops were becoming popular in Europe. For instance, potatoes and maize were brought from America and introduced to Europe. These crops were grown in large scale after 1750. In particular, the potato became a staple crop in places such as Ireland and Germany.


How did the agricultural revolution affect the human population?

The agricultural revolution in developing countries has produced large resident human populations with the potential for direct person-to-person spread of infection and greater environmental contamination by feces.


What was the agricultural revolution?

The agricultural revolution is the name given to a number of cultural transformations that initially allowed humans to change from a hunting and gathering subsistence to one of agriculture and animal domestications. Today, more than 80% of human worldwide diet is produced from less than a dozen crop species many of which were domesticated many years ago. Scientists study ancient remains, bone artifacts, and DNA to explore the past and present impact of plant and animal domestication and to make sense of the motivations behind early cultivation techniques. Archeological evidence illustrates that starting in the Holocene epoch approximately 12 thousand years ago (kya), the domestication of plants and animals developed in separate global locations most likely triggered by climate change and local population increases. This transition from hunting and gathering to agriculture occurred very slowly as humans selected crops for cultivation, animals for domestication, then continued to select plants and animals for desirable traits. The development of agriculture marks a major turning point in human history and evolution. In several independent domestication centers, cultivation of plants and animals flourished according to the particular environmental conditions of the region, whereas human migration and trade propelled the global spread of agriculture. This change in subsistence provided surplus plant food that accumulated during the summer and fall for storage and winter consumption, as well as domesticated animals that could be used for meat and dairy products throughout the year. Because these new survival strategies no longer required relocation and migration in search of food, humans were able to establish homesteads, towns, and communities, which, in turn, caused rapid increases in population densities and lead to the emergence of civilizations. This dependence on plant and animal domestication entailed a number of other environmental adaptations including deforestation, irrigation, and the allocation of land for specific crop cultivation. It also triggered various other innovations including new tool technologies, commerce, architecture, an intensified division of labor, defined socioeconomic roles, property ownership, and tiered political systems. This shift in subsistence mode provided a relatively safer existence and in general more leisure time for analytical and creative pursuits resulting in complex language development, and the accelerated evolution of art, religion, and science. However, increases in population density also correlated with the increased prevalence of diseases, interpersonal conflicts, and extreme social stratification. The rise of agriculture and the influence of genetics and culture (gene–culture coevolution) continue to affect modern humans through alterations in nutrition, predisposition to obesity, and exposure to new diseases. This chapter will cover the various regions that adopted early agricultural practices and look at the long-term positive and negative effects of agriculture on society.


What are the effects of urbanization?

Rapid urbanization, especially in the tropics, is often associated with increased poverty, poor housing and unsanitary conditions. The result is that people may be living in a more fecally polluted environment than in rural areas, encouraging such diseases as amebiasis and giardiasis.


What was the transition from hunting and gathering to agriculture?

This transition from hunting and gathering to agriculture occurred very slowly as humans selected crops for cultivation, animals for domestication, then continued to select plants and animals for desirable traits. The development of agriculture marks a major turning point in human history and evolution.


How does agriculture affect humans?

The rise of agriculture and the influence of genetics and culture (gene–culture coevolution) continue to affect modern humans through alterations in nutrition, predisposition to obesity, and exposure to new diseases.


Why did humans establish homesteads?

Because these new survival strategies no longer required relocation and migration in search of food, humans were able to establish homesteads, towns, and communities, which, in turn, caused rapid increases in population densities and lead to the emergence of civilizations.


When did domestication begin?

Archeological evidence illustrates that starting in the Holocene epoch approximately 12 thousand years ago (kya), the domestication of plants and animals developed in separate global locations most likely triggered by climate change and local population increases.


What were the main features of the agricultural revolution?

Jethro Tull. Another important feature of the Agricultural Revolution was the Enclosure Movement . In the decades and centuries before the 1700s, British farmers planted their crops on small strips of land while allowing their animals to graze on common fields shared collectively.


What was the agricultural revolution? What were some examples?

For example, the Industrial Revolution began in Britain in the 18th century due in part to an increase in food production, which was the key outcome of the Agricultural Revolution. As such, the Agricultural Revolution is considered to have begun in the 17th century and continued throughout the centuries that followed, alongside the Industrial Revolution.


Why was the increase in population important to the beginning of the Industrial Revolution?

The increased population was important to the beginning of the Industrial Revolution because it created a large workforce for the factories and mines that would be common during the time. A key aspect of the Industrial Revolution was the invention of different types of machines, many of which were used in farming and agriculture. …


How did the increase in food production help the Industrial Revolution?

First, the increased population helped produce workers for the factories and mines that were so important to the Industrial Revolution.


Why did European farmers not plant the same crop every year?

This would cause them to have to not plant anything in the field every few years in order to avoid destroying the quality of the soil.


When did the Industrial Revolution begin?

For example, the Industrial Revolution began in Britain in the 18th century due in part to an increase in food production, which was the key outcome of the Agricultural Revolution. As such, the Agricultural Revolution is considered to have begun in the 17th century and continued throughout the centuries that followed, …


What invention did Tull use to drill seeds into the soil?

As a result, Tull invented a seed drill with a rotating cylinder to drill the seeds into the soil. This made the planting process much quicker.


Where Did the Agricultural Revolution Start?

As discussed in the previous section, archeologists have found evidence of early agriculture all over the world. Archeological sites in China yield evidence of early rice paddies, while sites in the Americas have tools for the cultivation of potatoes, corn, and squash.


Causes of the Agricultural Revolution

Early humans did not have a written language to record how they changed from a hunter-gatherer to agrarian lifestyle. Historians and scientists use evidence from archeological sites to theorize the causes of the first agricultural revolution.


First Agricultural Revolution Effects

The First Agricultural Revolution had a monumental impact on human history, culture, and biology. Humans changed from a nomadic species of hunter-gatherers to a sedentary or settled species of farmers and herders. Humans developed diverse cultures, which included intellectual pursuits such as religion and art.


What was the shift to agriculture from hunting and gathering called?

Also called the Agricultural Revolution, the shift to agriculture from hunting and gathering changed humanity forever. By Erin Blakemore.


When did humans start farming?

Humans are thought to have gathered plants and their seeds as early as 23,000 years ago, and to have started farming cereal grains like barley as early as 11,000 years ago . Afterward, they moved on to protein-rich foods like peas and lentils.


What was the role of hunters in the Neolithic era?

During the Neolithic period, hunter-gatherers roamed the natural world, foraging for their food. But then a dramatic shift occurred. The foragers became farmers, transitioning from a hunter-gatherer lifestyle to a more settled one.


How did the Green Revolution affect agriculture?

The spread of Green Revolution agriculture affected both agricultural biodiversity (or agrodiversity) and wild biodiversity. There is little disagreement that the Green Revolution acted to reduce agricultural biodiversity, as it relied on just a few high-yield varieties of each crop.


Why is the Green Revolution not so successful?

Reasons cited include widespread corruption, insecurity, a lack of infrastructure, and a general lack of will on the part of the governments. Yet environmental factors, such as the availability of water for irrigation, the high diversity in slope and soil types in one given area are also reasons why the Green Revolution is not so successful in Africa.


What is CGIAR response?

CGIAR has responded, at least in part, to criticisms of Green Revolution methodologies. This began in the 1980s, and mainly was a result of pressure from donor organizations. Methods like agroecosystem analysis and farming system research have been adopted to gain a more holistic view of agriculture.


What was the main goal of the Chinese government?

When the Chinese Communists came to power in 1949, the Chinese state came to play a major role in agricultural policy and scientific research. It sought to solve China’s food security issues, eliminating hunger and starvation, seeking to transform traditional cultivation of existing strains of rice and to apply new science and technology to agricultural production. Through agrarian reform over the 1950s, it eliminated absentee landlords and created collective farms, which could utilize mechanized cultivation. However, grain production did not increase significantly until the state began promoting state-supported agricultural research and investment in infrastructure. The development of strains of hybrid rice had long been a practice in Chinese agriculture, but in the 1960s, this ramped up through government supported agricultural science. Prominent in the development of productive hybrid rice was Yuan Longping, whose research hybridized wild strains of rice with existing strains. He has been dubbed “the father of hybrid rice,” and was considered a national hero in China. The Chinese government’s policies gave cultivators technical assistance, access to affordable HYVs, fertilizers, and pesticides, and developed infrastructure. Chinese rice production met the nation’s food security needs. In recent years, however, extensive use of ground water for irrigation has drawn down aquifers and extensive use of fertilizers has increased greenhouse gas emissions. China has not expanded the area of cultivable land, but the Green Revolution with high yields per hectare gave China the food security it sought.


What happened in the aftermath of the Mexican Revolution?

In the aftermath of the Mexican Revolution, the government had redistributed land to peasants in some parts of the country which had broken the back of the hacienda system. During the presidency of Lázaro Cárdenas (1934-1940), land reform in Mexico reached its apex in the center and south of Mexico.


What was Mexico called during the Green Revolution?

Mexico has been called the ‘birthplace’ and ‘burial ground’ of the Green Revolution. It began with great promise and it has been argued that “during the twentieth century two ‘revolutions’ transformed rural Mexico: the Mexican Revolution (1910–1920) and the Green Revolution (1950–1970).”.


What were the key elements of the Revolution?

The key elements of the revolution include: 1) Use of the latest technological and capital inputs, 2) adoption of modern scientific methods of farming, 3) use of high yielding varieties of seeds, 4) proper use of chemical fertilizers, 5) consolidation of land holdings.

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