What happened as agriculture became entrenched in the south

The thing that happened as agriculture became entrenched in the South was that the South became too dependent on one crop, limiting development. The economy in the southern states based so much on agriculture.

As agriculture became entrenched in the South, the South became too dependent on one crop, limiting development.

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Answer

How did the south expand its cotton industry?

Powerful navies protected them against piracy. And newly invented steam engines powered these ships, as well as looms and weaving machines, which increased the capacity to produce cotton cloth. With all these factors amping up production and distribution, the South was poised to expand its cotton-based economy.

How did the south make money during the Civil War?

By the start of the war, the South was producing 75 percent of the world’s cotton and creating more millionaires per capita in the Mississippi River valley than anywhere in the nation. Slaves represented Southern planters’ most significant investment —and the bulk of their wealth.

How did the resurgence of slavery in the south affect people?

The resurgence of slavery in the American South depressed many people, from common citizens to political leaders. They recognized that with each passing year, it would become harder and harder for the Southern states to abandon slavery and establish a free society.

How did the northern colonies react to the Southern plantation economy?

Some politicians and merchants in the Northern colonies became convinced that Southern plantation (large farm) owners were building a society that was not as efficient and prosperous as it could be.


How did the cotton gin affect the Southern economy?

The cotton gin dramatically increased the amount of money flowing into the Southern economy, but it also renewed the dying institution of slavery. Cotton producers needed laborers to plant and pick the huge quantities of cotton intended for markets in Great Britain, France, and New England, so slaves were assigned to take care of this physically demanding work. As cotton production increased, so too did Southern dependence on slave labor. From 1790 to 1810, the number of African slaves on American soil increased by 70 percent. The number of enslaved Americans continued to rise throughout the 1820s and 1830s, even after importation of foreign slaves ended in 1808. By 1860, the census counted nearly four million slaves in America, and it was clear that the institution of slavery had become completely interwoven in the fabric of Southern society.


Where did immigrants settle in the 1860s?

But millions of others settled in the slums of big Northern cities like New York, Boston, and Philadelphia, where they toiled in factories and shipyards. By 1860, immigration had boosted the population in America’s Northern states to nearly eighteen million.


Why did Thomas Jefferson not abandon slavery?

Historians have long debated the reasons for Jefferson’s inability to abandon a practice that he knew was morally wrong. Some people claim that his financial dependence on slave labor kept him in the slaveholder camp. Others say that his desire to retain his high place in Southern society played a part in his continued ownership of slaves. In any event, the issue of slavery haunted Jefferson throughout his life, even as he helped guide America through its first years of independence. “All his adult life, Thomas Jefferson . . . tossed and turned in an agony of ambivalence [simultaneously conflicting feelings] over the dilemma of slavery and freedom,” wrote biographer Willard Sterne Randall in Thomas Jefferson: A Life. “Repeatedly he sought to have public institutions relieve him of the burden of his conscience while he tried to avoid giving offense to his close-knit family and the slaveowning society of his beloved Virginia. He knew slavery was evil, he called it evil and spoke out against it in a series of public forums, but he would only push so far—and then he would fall back on a way of life utterly dependent on slave labor.”


How did the Northern states compromise on slavery?

In addition, representatives of the Northern states agreed that even though slaves would not be allowed to vote, each slave would be counted in the census as three-fifths of a person . (The census is the government’s official calculation of the entire population.) The slavery compromise was an important victory for slaveholding states, because each state’s representation in the U.S. Congress—and thus its political power—was determined by the size of its population. Other clauses of the Constitution instituted taxes on slave “property” and made it easier for slaveholders to regain custody of runaway slaves.


Why was slavery important in the early 1700s?

This was especially true in the Southern colonies, which used slaves to produce crops like tobacco, rice, and sugar for European markets. The number of slaves increased, too, as children born to slaves were forced into the same life that their mothers and fathers endured.


How many slaves were there in 1860?

By 1860, the census counted nearly four million slaves in America, and it was clear that the institution of slavery had become completely interwoven in the fabric of Southern society. The resurgence of slavery in the American South depressed many people, from common citizens to political leaders.


What states were formed out of the Northwest Territory?

Several new states (Michigan, Wisconsin, Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, and parts of Minnesota) were eventually formed out of this region, known as the Northwest Territory. The South also agreed to a clause that would outlaw the importation of slaves from Africa (but not slavery itself) in 1808, twenty years down the road.

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