What is a combine in agriculture

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The modern combine harvester, or simply combine, is a versatile machine designed to efficiently harvest a variety of grain crops. The name derives from its combining four separate harvesting operations—reaping, threshing, gathering, and winnowing—into a single process.

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Answer

What is a Combine which is used in agriculture?

combine, also called combine harvester, complex farm machine that both cuts and threshes grains and certain other crops. Combines are used in the harvesting and cleaning of cereals such as wheat, barley, corn (maize), oats, rice, rye, and sorghum, as well as a number of non-grain crops, including flax, rapeseed, soybeans, and sunflower seeds.

Who makes the best combine?

Who makes the most reliable combine?

  • John Deere.
  • Case International Harvester.
  • New Holland.
  • Massey Ferguson.

Who makes small combines?

  • Ransomes – initial imported Bolinder-Munktell trailed combines to UK in 1953
  • Rector (Argentina)
  • Rotania (Argentina)
  • RyCSA (Argentina)

What is a farm combine?

Unlike conventionally diesel-powered tractors, electric farm tractors are run by battery. These tractors offer a wide range of benefits over conventional tractors, such as better efficiency and enhanced productivity in the agricultural field.

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What is an agricultural combine?

The combine, short for combine harvester, is an essential and complex machine designed for efficient harvesting of mass quantities of grain. Modern combines can cut a swath through a field more than 40 feet wide. The name comes from combining three essential harvest functions – reaping, threshing and winnowing.


What is combine process?

Combining process is an operation focusing on a single feature i.e. to upgrade the fiber in textile manufacturing process. This is only done to upgrade the raw materials quality. The silver obtained from the card is processed to improve its quality through combining.


Is a combine a tractor?

A combine, or combine harvester, is a specific type of tractor used for harvesting. This important machine performs 3 functions- reaping, threshing and cleaning which allows grain crops to be harvested more quickly and efficiently, and allows farmers to harvest more grain!


Why is a farm combine called a combine?

The name combine derives from combining three separate harvesting processes. Reaping, threshing, winnowing – combining all three operations into one led to the invention of the combine harvester, simply known as the combine.


What’s a combine do?

In design, the combine is essentially a binder-type cutting device that cuts and delivers the grain or seed crop to a threshing machine modified to work as it moves across the field. The cutting–gathering component, designed to take the grain with a minimum of straw, is sometimes called the header.


What are the parts of a combine?

Made up of about 21 parts including the header, reel, cutter bar, sieves, rotating blades, grain tank, unloading pipe, augers, conveyors, belts, layers, wheels and much more, this agricultural implement can be used to harvest, winnow and thresh crops like rice, corn, wheat, sunflower, pulses, barley, flax and soybeans.


How is a combine different from a harvester?

Combine Harvester commonly known as ‘combine’ is a key invention that saves cost and time for farmers. Like the name suggests, this machine simply combines the three major harvesting operations – reaping, threshing, and winnowing into a single process.


What is the difference between a combine harvester and a forage harvester?

A combine harvester is similar to a forage harvester in that it efficiently harvests a variety of crops. However, the key difference here is that they aren’t being used to produce silage. Instead, combine harvester reap, thresh, gather, and winnow crops in one single process.


How much is a combine?

Most new John Deere combines are priced from $380,000 to $480,000, said Michael Cessna, a sales representative for the Arends-Hogan-Walker (AHW) dealership east of Urbana. With add-on features, farmers might be looking at $500,000 for a combine, “but you could get up to $600,000 real easy,” Cessna said.


How do combines work?

The Anatomy of a Combine The cut crops move toward the center via spinning augers and travel up a conveyor. The threshing segment of the combine beats the cut crops to break and shake the grains away from their stalks. The separated grains travel by conveyor into a grain tank.


How wide is a combine?

Length: 26 feet. Width: 11 feet 8 inches. Height: 11 feet 8 inches. To haul your inoperable combine to its next workstation, call Tye at Tractor Transport directly.


How do you run a combine?

2:2115:24Farm Equipment Tour: How to Drive a Combine – YouTubeYouTubeStart of suggested clipEnd of suggested clipBecause you can just pull into the next row. And then double-click the number two button and thatMoreBecause you can just pull into the next row. And then double-click the number two button and that will automatically engage the auto steer. Function.


How are sidehill combines different from hillside combines?

Sidehill combines are very similar to hillside combines in that they level the combine to the ground so that the threshing can be efficiently conducted; however, they have some very distinct differences. Modern hillside combines level around 35% on average, while older machines were closer to 50%. Sidehill combines only level to 18%. They are sparsely used in the Palouse region. Rather, they are used on the gentle rolling slopes of the midwest. Sidehill combines are much more mass-produced than their hillside counterparts. The height of a sidehill machine is the same height as a level-land combine. Hillside combines have added steel that sets them up approximately 2–5 feet higher than a level-land combine and provide a smooth ride.


What is a Palouse combine?

Palouse hills. A Massey Ferguson combine fitted with the hillside leveling option. In the Palouse region of the Pacific Northwest of the United States the combine is retrofitted with a hydraulic hillside leveling system. This allows the combine to harvest the steep but fertile soil in the region.


How many acres were harvested from the 1839 combine harvester?

In 1835, Moore built a full-scale version with a length of 5.2 m (17 ft) and a cut width of 4.57 m (15 ft); by 1839, over 20 ha (50 acres) of crops were harvested. This combine harvester was pulled by 20 horses fully handled by farmhands. By 1860, combine harvesters with a cutting, …


How many augers are needed for a combine?

In most modern combines, the grain is transported to the shoe by a set of 2, 3, or 4 (possibly more on the largest machines) augers, set parallel or semi-parallel to the rotor on axial mounted rotors and perpendicular on “Axial Flow” combines. In older Gleaner machines, these augers were not present.


When was the first self-propelled combine harvester invented?

In 1952 Claeys launched the first self-propelled combine harvester in Europe; in 1953, the European manufacturer Claas developed a self-propelled combine harvester named ‘ Hercules ‘, it could harvest up to 5 tons of wheat a day. This newer kind of combine is still in use and is powered by diesel or gasoline engines.


What technology has made it possible to create field maps?

The advent of GPS and GIS technologies has made it possible to create field maps, which can assist in navigation, and in the preparation of yield maps, which show which parts of the field are more productive.


What is a combine header?

Combine header. Combines are equipped with removable header that are designed for particular crops. The standard header, sometimes called a grain platform, is equipped with a reciprocating knife cutter bar, and features a revolving reel with metal teeth to cause the cut crop to fall into the auger once it is cut.


The Use Of Combine Harvester In Agriculture Field

The use of combine harvester has revolutionized agriculture and has made life easy for the farmer. Prior to the arrival of this equipment, farmers would carry out harvesting manually. This was a cumbersome process and needed a lot of time and manpower. The labor needs would increase with the increase in the size of the farm.


What is the combine harvester?

The combine harvester is a piece of farming equipment that has automated the process of harvesting. The use of combine harvester in harvesting has helped in automating three activities related to harvesting. Reaping, winnowing, and threshing are three harvesting related activities that were done manually.


What is a combine?

The combine, short for combine harvester, is an essential and complex machine designed for efficient harvesting of mass quantities of grain. Modern combines can cut a swath through a field more than 40 feet wide. The name comes from combining three essential harvest functions – reaping, threshing and winnowing.


When was the combine invented?

Hiram Moore patented the first U.S. combine in 1935. Early versions were horse-drawn, followed by models that were pulled behind a tractor. The mid-twentieth century saw the introduction of the self-propelled combine, and by the 1980s they began to come equipped with on-board electronics to measure operation and yield data.


What is the name of the grain that is harvested with a head?

The name comes from combining three essential harvest functions – reaping, threshing and winnowing. Corn, soybeans, wheat, oats, rye, barley, sorghum, flax, sunflowers and canola can all be harvested with a head designed for that particular grain. Hiram Moore patented the first U.S. combine in 1935. Early versions were horse-drawn, followed by …


What is a combine platform?

Combines come with essentially two types of grain platforms. The traditional platform features an auger with a steel floor. The draper platform uses a belt to feed the plant into the combine to separate the grain. A flex draper uses flex cutterbars that self-adjust as the head passes over uneven ground or small obstacles.


What are the challenges of harvesting downed corn?

Weather damage to crops can add to harvest challenges. There are tricks to harvesting downed corn, but first the farmer should determine if the crop is worth salvaging or if the loss is too great. The most important factor in any harvest is safety. Know the crop, know the equipment, and know the operator’s limits.


How does a combine work?

The Anatomy of a Combine 1 The header cuts off the plant close to the ground and moves the whole plant into the machine. Farmers switch out the header depending on if they are harvesting corn, soybeans or other crops. 2 The cut crops move toward the center via spinning augers and travel up a conveyor. 3 The threshing segment of the combine beats the cut crops to break and shake the grains away from their stalks. 4 The separated grains travel by conveyor into a grain tank. The unwanted stalks, husks, cobs and/or bits of leaves – known as chaff or residue – move along different conveyors, as more grain falls through into the tank. 5 When the grain tank is full, a tractor with a grain cart on the back pulls alongside the combine. The grain is carried up from the tank by an elevator and shoots out of a side pipe, or unloader, into the grain cart. 6 The residue exits the back of the machine to either be spread across a wide area or baled as straw to use for animal bedding. Most machines use a straw chopper to make it smaller and more manageable.


How do combine harvesters get their name?

Combine harvesters get their name from the way they automatically combine the processes of harvesting and separating of grain crops into one step, an otherwise laborious series of operations once done separately. It can harvest crops like corn, wheat, soybeans, rye, barley and oats.


How is grain transported from a tank?

The grain is carried up from the tank by an elevator and shoots out of a side pipe, or unloader, into the grain cart. The residue exits the back of the machine to either be spread across a wide area or baled as straw to use for animal bedding. Most machines use a straw chopper to make it smaller and more manageable.


What is residue in a combine?

The unwanted stalks, husks, cobs and/or bits of leaves – known as chaff or residue – move along different conveyors, as more grain falls through into the tank. When the grain tank is full, a tractor with a grain cart on the back pulls alongside the combine.


What is a header in a planter?

The header cuts off the plant close to the ground and moves the whole plant into the machine. Farmers switch out the header depending on if they are harvesting corn, soybeans or other crops.


What is a combine harvester?

A Combine Harvester also known as Combine or a Thresher ia a very effective Agricultural Machine that executes the tasks of harvesting, threshing and cleaning variety of crops. The history of harvesting combines goes back to 500 B.C. and that time wooden implements were used.


What is a pull type harvester combine?

Pull type with auxiliary engine are pulled by a tractor but a separate engine is mounted on the harvesting combine which supplies power to cutting, thrashing and other requirements. These type of combines are not much in production. Self propelled harvester combine is self contained unit with an engine over it.


Why is the bed grain separated from the chaff?

The bed grain is separated friom chaff due to vibrations and short straw is carried to the chaffer rack. When grains, chaff and short straw are being dropped from the chaffer rack, air is directed from the blower which blows the chaff and short straw away from combine.


What is the gap between a concave and a drum?

The gap between concave and drum can easily be increased or decreased. For concave there are 2 adjustments, one is instantaneous which brings the basket close to thrashing drum and other is fine adjustment. A debrading sheet is placed on the first 2 rows of concave. It is operated from outside.


How does a standing crop work?

The standing crop is guided to the cutter mechanism by reel. The dividers are also supplied to divide the crop which comes to the machine and the remaining part standing in the field is slightly pushed apart so that is saved from the damage by machine.


Where is the cut crop on a cutter bar?

The cut crop falls into the pan of the cutter bar. it has auger with right and left hand flights on it and it brings the cut crop to the centre of auger. Fitted prongs are located in the centre of auger and convey the crop to feeder channel, chain and slats running in feeder.


What is a combine harvester?

Combine harvester is a multi-functional machine for crop harvesting. Combine harvesters can gather over 80 different types of crops (wheat, corn, soybeans, sunflowers, barley, clover, etc.) Picture – Combine Harvester operating on the farm. [1]


Where is the largest market for combine harvesters?

India – The world’s largest market of Combine Harvesters. According to Mordor Intelligence, India market for combine harvester is potential thanks to its expected growth rate of 10.6% during the forecast period 2020-2025.


What is the difference between a sidehill and a hillside combine?

According to Wikipedia, Hillside combine harvesters around 35% on average (older models can reach up to 50%). However, Sidehill combines only level to nearly 18%.


How are grains delivered to the grain tank?

Picture – Grains are delivered to the grain tank via a pipe unloader. [13] Grains are then delivered to the cleaning unit of combine harvester. One by-product from this working process is the material-other-than-grain (MOG), which include remaining leaves and stems with limited nutrients.


What is the combination of three sequential tasks in the harvesting activity?

The word “combine” refers to the combination of three sequential tasks in the harvesting activity: Reaping: means cutting or gathering crops (like rice fields) ( Picture 02 ). Threshing: means the beating and separating the seeds from stalks ( Picture 03).


What is John Deere?

John Deere – PIONEER in combine harvester industry. John Deere is the official brand name of Deere & Company – an American company, founded in 1837. The company operates MAINLY in agricultural, construction and forestry machinery. According to the Fortune 500 America’s ranking of 2019, John Deere was ranked 87th.


What is a combine harvester?

Combine or combine harvester is innovative equipment that can be used for harvesting. It is named so as it can be used to combine three different harvesting operations – reaping, threshing, and winnowing. Combine concaves play a key role in the working of a combine.


What is a combine concave?

The combine concave is an important component of the combine harvester. Different types are available in the market that can be used depending on the usage of the combine. You can get the type you want based on the crops that you grow in your field.


What is the front part of a combine?

The combine has a front part known as the reel that pulls the grain stalk and pushes it inside the machine. The grain stalks are then moved up on a conveyer belt to the threshing cylinder. This is one of the main components of the machine. The cylinder rotates over the concave at high speed.


Why is it important to manage concave?

There is space between the rotating cylinder and the concave. This ensures a smooth flow of material. It is important to set the space correctly.


Why do concaves work in threshing?

At the time of threshing, the concave helps in removing the seeds and separating them from the stalks.


What is a combine concave?

Combine concave is a part of a combine harvester that plays two major roles in the harvesting process – threshing (removing seeds from the plants) and winnowing (separating them from the chaff). Combine concaves help in improving the quality and yield of the crop harvested.


What is the process of harvesting?

Such tasks include the use of a scythe to cut down the crop, the beating of stalks, the wind winnowing, and the cleanup of residual debris on the ground.

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Overview

The modern combine harvester, or simply combine, is a versatile machine designed to efficiently harvest a variety of grain crops. The name derives from its combining four separate harvesting operations—reaping, threshing, gathering, and winnowing—into a single process. Among the crops harvested with a combine are wheat, rice, oats, rye, barley, corn (maize), sorghum, soybeans, flax (lin…


History

In 1826 in Scotland, the inventor Reverend Patrick Bell designed (but did not patent) a reaper machine, which used the scissors principle of plant cutting; a principle that is still used today. The Bell machine was pushed by horses. A few Bell machines were available in the United States. In 1835, in the United States, Hiram Moore built and patented the first combine harvester, which was capabl…


Combine header

Combines are equipped with removable header that are designed for particular crops. The standard header, sometimes called a grain platform, is equipped with a reciprocating knife cutter bar, and features a revolving reel with metal teeth to cause the cut crop to fall into the auger once it is cut. A variation of the platform, a “flex” platform, is similar but has a cutter bar that can flex over contours and ridges to cut soybeans that have pods close to the ground. A flex head can cu…


Conventional combine

The cut crop is carried up the feeder throat (commonly called the “feederhouse”), by a chain and flight elevator, then fed into the threshing mechanism of the combine, consisting of a rotating threshing drum (commonly called the “cylinder”), to which grooved steel bars (rasp bars) are bolted. The rasp bars thresh or separate the grains and chaff from the straw through the action of the cylinder against the concave, a shaped “half drum”, also fitted with steel bars and a meshed …


Hillside leveling

In the Palouse region of the Pacific Northwest of the United States the combine is retrofitted with a hydraulic hillside leveling system. This allows the combine to harvest the steep but fertile soil in the region. Hillsides can be as steep as a 50% slope. Gleaner, IH and Case IH, John Deere, and others all have made combines with this hillside leveling system, and local machine shops have fabricated the…


Sidehill leveling

Sidehill combines are very similar to hillside combines in that they level the combine to the ground so that the threshing can be efficiently conducted; however, they have some very distinct differences. Modern hillside combines level around 35% on average, while older machines were closer to 50%. Sidehill combines only level to 18%. They are sparsely used in the Palouse region. Rather, they are used on the gentle rolling slopes of the midwest. Sidehill combines are much m…


Maintaining threshing speed

Another technology that is sometimes used on combines is a continuously variable transmission. This allows the ground speed of the machine to be varied while maintaining a constant engine and threshing speed. It is desirable to keep the threshing speed constant since the machine will typically have been adjusted to operate best at a certain speed.


The threshing process

Despite great advances in mechanics and computer control, the basic operation of the combine harvester has remained unchanged almost since it was invented.
Power requirements over the years have increased due to larger capacities and some processes such as rotary threshing and straw chopping take considerab…

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