What is a slash and burn agriculture

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Things to Remember

  • Slash-and-Burn Agriculture is a land use that dates back to the beginning of agricultural history. …
  • When no primary forest exists the fallow season shortens, secondary forests gradually disappear, and new techniques emerge or are adopted. …
  • Slash-and-Burn Agriculture is considered the primary source of deforestation. …

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Full
Answer

What are some alternatives to slash and burn agriculture?

Disadvantages of slash and burn agriculture

  • Deforestation. One of the disadvantages of using slash and burn agriculture is deforestation. …
  • Endangered species. Numerous species of insects, animals, and plants which were adapted to that particular rainforest are in danger due to slash and burn agriculture.
  • The quality of the soil. After this agricultural practice is used, the quality of the soil improves, getting a boost from the layer of ash.

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What are the steps in slash and burn farming?

What are the steps in slash and burn farming?

  • Cut trees and brush.
  • Burn down and fertilize soil.
  • Plant crops.
  • Move on.

What is the definition of slash and burn farming?

Slash and burn farming is a form of shifting agriculture where the natural vegetation is cut down and burned as a method of clearing the land for cultivation, and then, when the plot becomes infertile, the farmer moves to a new fresh plat and does the same again. This process is repeated over and over.

What does slash mean in agriculture Dictionary?

Slash-and-burn agriculture is a farming method that involves the cutting and burning of plants in a forest or woodland to create a field called a swidden.The method begins by cutting down the trees and woody plants in an area. The downed vegetation, or “slash“, is then left to dry, usually right before the rainiest part of the year.Then, the biomass is burned, resulting in a nutrient-rich …

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What is the meaning of slash and burn agriculture?

slash-and-burn agriculture, method of cultivation in which forests are burned and cleared for planting.


What is slash and burn agriculture and who used it?

Slash & burn agriculture is a form of agriculture that has been practiced in places all around the world for centuries. The process starts with an area of land that is covered with foliage such as trees and shrubs.


Is a slash and burn agricultural?

Slash-and-burn, alternatively known as shifting cultivation or swidden, is an agricultural system where farms and their existing vegetation are cut down and burned off, and subsequently, the land is used for the cultivation of agricultural crops.


What is slash and burn agriculture for kids?

Slash and burn is a method of farming that involves clearing land by destroying and burning all the trees and plants on it, farming there for a short time, and then moving on to clear a new piece of land.


What do you mean by slash and burn agriculture class 10?

Slash and burn agriculture:Slash-and-burn Agriculture is a type of farming that involves cutting and burning plants in a forest or woodland to produce a swidden field. Cutting down trees and woody plants in an area is the first step in the procedure.


What do you mean by slash and burn agriculture Class 7?

Slash and burn is a method of farming that involves clearing land by destroying and burning all the trees and plants on it, farming there for a short time, and then moving on to clear a new piece of land.


Why is slash and burn agriculture bad for the environment?

After it dries out, the area is set ablaze. Farmers then plant crops in the soil that’s left behind. After a few years, this soil is depleted of it’s essential nutrients and farmers must move on. In their wake they leave a destroyed ecosystem that was the former home to numerous species of plants, insects, and animals.


What is slash and burn farming What are its disadvantages?

After the soil loses its fertility, the land is abandoned and the cultivator moves to a new plot. Shifting cultivation is also known as ‘slash and burn’ agriculture. Deforestation, losing fertility of land and soil erosion are the disadvantages of shifting cultivation.


Why do African farmers practice slash and burn farming?

26, 2020. Slash and burn agriculture techniques is thought to have started sometime around 8,000 years ago. Agriculture within less hydroponically advanced countries rely on a continuous cycle of cultivation, harvest, and burning of farmland to help replenish vital nutrients for the next year’s harvest.


What are the steps in slash and burn farming?

Arrange the steps involved in slash and burn agriculture in the correct order, from top to bottom.A. Identify land.B. Felling of trees.C. Setting fire.D. Sowing.E. Abandoning Land.


Where is slash and burn used?

Slash-and-burn agriculture is often used by tropical-forest root-crop farmers in various parts of the world and by dry-rice cultivators of the forested hill country of Southeast Asia. The ash provides some fertilization, and the plot is relatively free of weeds. After several years of cultivation, fertility declines and weeds increase.


What happens after a year of cultivation?

After several years of cultivation, fertility declines and weeds increase. Traditionally, the area was left fallow and reverted to a secondary forest of bush. Cultivation would then shift to a new plot. After about a decade the old site could be reused.


Where did swidden farming originate?

Swidden production, also known as slash-and-burn agriculture, was practiced from temperate eastern North America to the tropical lowlands of South America. Field fertility in swidden systems resulted from the burning of trees and shrubs in order to add nutrients to the soil. Such systems had high ecological diversity, thus providing…


Does slash and burn produce carbon dioxide?

Although traditional practices generally contributed few greenhouse gases because of their scale, modern slash-and-burn techniques are a significant source of carbon dioxide emissions, especially when used to initiate permanent deforestation. In Southeast Asia, slash-and- burn agriculture for oil palm cultivation has been a major source …


What is slash and burn farming?

Slash and burn agriculture is a highly controversial and misunderstood practice. The practice has sometimes been associated with mass cutting, clearing and deforestation, but in fact “slash and burn” agriculture has a long standing history. The term slash and burn does sound harsh and destructive, but this farming technique, also known as shifting cultivation, can be extremely fruitful and sustainable if done correctly.The harsh cutting that is so often associated with slash and burn, is actually not at all the same practice. In the negative cases, large scale forests – often rainforests – are cut and cleared to make room for huge agricultural plots. These new farm lands are then usually planted with a single crop that is cultivated on that land until the soil is depleted of all viable nutrients. The process of shifting cultivation, however, is based on maintaining a sustainable, balanced form of farming that rotates and “shifts” within a given area, in order to allow the natural habitat to recuperate. Much like with seasons, there are various stages to this form of farming, and the process is not done in one fell swoop, cutting down entire forests and replanting them immediately.


Where is slash and burn cultivation?

Slash and burn cultivation (locally called jhum cultivation in India) in progress at Wokha, Nagaland, India. Similarly, the fire works as a natural pesticide, and thus no harmful chemicals are needed prior to planting. Once an area has been burned, it is then planted with the desired crop. Part of the shifting aspect of shifting cultivation, which …


How does slash and burn affect the environment?

One of the biggest perceived issues with slash and burn and shifting cultivation farming techniques is the negative impact on the environment. It is true that deforestation and uncontrolled slashing have had massive nad devastating impacts on ecosystems and habitats as well as greatly affected the environment at large. The removal of large expanses of trees and vegetation not only eliminates some of the world’s greatest carbon absorbers, but it has also led to erosion, soil nutrient depletion and left many areas completely barren wastelands. This drastic type of slashing is what is so often associated with slash and burn techniques, and has been argued against and ridiculed on a wide scale. However properly monitored and controlled shifting cultivation actually does not affect the environment in this way. One reason is, as mentioned above, the crops are rotated. This means that nutrients do not get depleted as rapidly or as thoroughly. When the same crop is planted in a given area season after season, the particular nutrients needed to nourish that plant are used at an increased rate. By rotating out plant crops, the soil has a chance to replenish – at least partially – between uses. Of course, for the nutrients to fully replenish, the soil does need down time, where no cultivation or agriculture occurs, which is why the most sustainable shifting agriculture involves rest periods where the ground is allowed to fallow and grow plants naturally.


What is shifting cultivation?

Shifting cultivation allows natural habitats to remain, and maintains biodiversity while still yielding crops. Sustainable slash and burn is more commonly known as shifting cultivation, meaning crops and farming rotate in a given area to maintain the soil and natural environment. Slash and burn agriculture is a highly controversial …


How does slash and burn work?

Once an area is established, trees, shrubs and large vegetation are all cut and left to dry out. After the plants have had ample time to dry, which usually takes a few days, intentional fires are set. The burning of the vegetation provides nutrients to the soil. When the trees and shrubs are burned, they break down nutrients in the dead plants, and make them more readily available to the soil. This process works much in the same way as adding fertilizer to soil before planting, except that the fertilizer in this case is natural, and coming directly from the burned plants that were already growing in that area.


How many seasons does shifting cultivation take?

Part of the shifting aspect of shifting cultivation, which is not found in other types of slashing, is that these crops are usually only planted for two growing seasons. This way, the plants benefit from the nutrient rich soil, without allowing the area to be over-used or completely depleted.


Why is shifting cultivation important?

The process of shifting cultivation, however, is based on maintaining a sustainable, balanced form of farming that rotates and “shifts” within a given area, in order to allow the natural habitat to recuperate.

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How Does Shifting Cultivation Work?

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Firstly, slash and burn is carefully planned, and certain areas are selected for slashing, rather than targeting an entire forest or field. This is usually around a hectare-sized piece of land. Once an area is established, trees, shrubs and large vegetation are all cut and left to dry out. After the plants have had ample time to d…

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Shifting Cultivation and The Environment

  • One of the biggest perceived issues with slash and burn and shifting cultivation farming techniques is the negative impact on the environment. It is true that deforestation and uncontrolled slashing have had massive nad devastating impacts on ecosystems and habitats as well as greatly affected the environment at large. The removal of large expanses of trees and ve…

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Impact on Climate Change

  • While mass cutting has been linked to climate change in a negative way, sustainable slash and burn agriculture can, in fact, be helpful. It is true that deforestation has had a large and negative effect on climate change. Because forests and trees are such large absorbers of CO2, the removal of these plants has led to an increase of carbon in the Earth’s atmosphere, which in turn has imp…

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Overview

Slash-and-burn agriculture is a farming method that involves the cutting and burning of plants in a forest or woodland to create a field called a swidden. The method begins by cutting down the trees and woody plants in an area. The downed vegetation, or “slash”, is then left to dry, usually right before the rainiest part of the year. Then, the biomass is burned, resulting in a nutrient-rich layer of ash which makes the soil fertile, as well as temporarily eliminating weed and pest species. After a…


History

Historically, slash-and-burn cultivation has been practiced throughout much of the world. Fire was already used by hunter-gatherers before the invention of agriculture, and still is in present times. Clearings created by the fire were made for many reasons, such as to provide new growth for game animals and to promote certain kinds of edible plants.
During the Neolithic Revolution, groups of hunter-gatherers domesticated various plants and anim…


Technique

Slash-and-burn fields are typically used and owned by a family until the soil is exhausted. At this point the ownership rights are abandoned, the family clears a new field, and trees and shrubs are permitted to grow on the former field. After a few decades, another family or clan may then use the land and claim usufructuary rights. In such a system there is typically no market in farmland, so land is not bought or sold on the open market and land rights are traditional.


Benefits and drawbacks

This system of agriculture provides millions of people with food and income. It has been ecologically sustainable for thousands of years. Because the leached soil in many tropical regions, such as the Amazon, are nutritionally extremely poor, slash-and-burn is one of the only types of agriculture which can be practiced in these areas. Slash-and-burn farmers typically plant a variety of crops, instead of a monoculture, and contribute to a higher biodiversity due to creati…


Regionally

Tribal groups in the northeastern Indian states of Tripura, Arunachal Pradesh, Meghalaya, Mizoram and Nagaland and the Bangladeshi districts of Rangamati, Khagrachari, Bandarban and Sylhet refer to slash-and-burn agriculture as jhum or jhoom cultivation. The system involves clearing land, by fire or clear-felling, for economically-important crops such as upland rice, vegetables or fruits. After a …


Research

This type of agriculture is discouraged by many developmental or environmentalist organisations, with the main alternatives being promoted are switching to more intensive, permanent farming methods, or promoting a shift from farming to working in different, higher-paying industries altogether. Other organisations promote helping farmers achieve higher productivity by introducing new techniques.


Gallery

• Santa Cruz, Bolivia
• Chiang Mai, Thailand
• Arunachal Pradesh, India


See also

• 2006 Southeast Asian haze
• 2013 Southeast Asian haze
• 2015 Southeast Asian haze
• 2019 Amazon rainforest wildfires

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