What is agricultural intensification

Agricultural intensification can be technically defined as an increase in agricultural production per unit of inputs (which may be labour

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, land, time, fertilizer, seed, feed or cash).

This is the process of humans changing the style of agriculture to move along the gradient from the lowest impact (shifting cultivation) all the way up to the industrial, high impact forms of agriculture. Intensification means a greater concentration of inputs and/or outputs per unit area.

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What is an example of intensive farming?

Types Of Intensive Farming

  • Livestock. The term livestock refers to those individual animals who have no choice but to endure life on farms.
  • Crops. Monocropping is a defining feature of intensive plant agriculture. …
  • Aquaculture. …
  • Sustainability. …

What is an example of extensive farming?

  • higher input costs/acre
  • Low diversity of organisms which feed off crops- not always to their detriment (through use of insecticides)
  • Mono cultures (e.g. …
  • Lower soil born bacteria/ organisms associated with that (due to pesticides/insecticides)
  • Potential to contaminate local water sources with fert/sprays.

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What is intensive farming?

Residents in the Leominster, Bromyard and Kington areas have been invited to contribute evidence to a review into the potential health and wellbeing impacts of intensive poultry farming. Herefordshire County Council is setting up a a task and finish group …

How does farming impact the environment?

But animal agriculture is facing increased scrutiny, especially around environmental impacts and animal welfare issues. It is a significant source of greenhouse gas emissions, upwards of 16.5 per …


What is the meaning of agriculture intensification?

Agricultural intensification can be technically defined as an increase in agricultural production per unit of inputs (which may be labour, land, time, fertilizer, seed, feed or cash).


Which is an example of agricultural intensification?

Examples of agricultural intensification may range from using new pesticides in intensive agriculture to intensifying the use of indigenous and context-specific knowledge in local farming practices.


What is agricultural intensification quizlet?

Agricultural Intensification. Intensification of agriculture involves increasing the control of the productivity of the land. It is often a result of population increase/pressure or social demands to create surpluses for elites. Evidence for Agricultural Intensification.


What is the effect of intensification?

Some activities associated with intensification, including increased use of fertilizer and other chemical inputs, are documented to have direct negative impacts on air and water quality, soil fertility, and other parts of the ecosystem.


What is agriculture intensification and negative impacts?

Agricultural intensification, through increasing fertilization input within fields and cropland expansion at landscape scales, is considered a key driver of biodiversity loss and the decline of ecosystem services8.


What is intensification of food production?

Intensification of food production- farmers grow more types of crops on the same piece of land or allowing more cycles of planting and harvesting in a year. This is achieved by increasing the productivity of the land which results in higher yields.


Does agricultural intensification cause tipping points in ecosystem services?

Conclusions. Such non-linear thresholds in ES will need to be avoided in the future by approaches aiming to deliver sustainable agricultural intensification. A number of positive feedback mechanisms are identified that suggest these thresholds could be considered as tipping points.


What are the impacts of agriculture on the environment?

Agriculture contributes to a number larger of environmental issues that cause environmental degradation including: climate change, deforestation, biodiversity loss, dead zones, genetic engineering, irrigation problems, pollutants, soil degradation, and waste.


How does intensive farming affect biodiversity?

Intensive farming It can quickly reduce key nutrients in the soil and lowers biodiversity.


Why is intensification important for agriculture?

We talked earlier about the lack of food security and we know that intensification is important in these efforts. We also know that intensification is important because it will be an important response to global climate change. However, we also know that intensification can have heavy, heavy environmental impacts. The ‘Land Sparing Debate’ is the over whether the benefits of intensification outweigh the costs of the impacts.


What is highly intensive agriculture?

You can think of highly intensive agriculture having a lot of inputs as well as a lot of outputs per unit area. Low intensity agriculture or ‘extensive’ agriculture has a low level of inputs, (inputs here also include labor as well as agro-chemicals and water supply).


What is the process of humans changing the style of agriculture to move along the gradient from the lowest impact (shifting cultivation

This is the process of humans changing the style of agriculture to move along the gradient from the lowest impact (shifting cultivation) all the way up to the industrial, high impact forms of agriculture. Intensification means a greater concentration of inputs and/or outputs per unit area. You can think of highly intensive agriculture having a lot of inputs as well as a lot of outputs per unit area. Low intensity agriculture or ‘extensive’ agriculture has a low level of inputs, (inputs here also include labor as well as agro-chemicals and water supply).


What is farm intensification?

She has defined agricultural intensification as ‘the gradual change towards patterns of land use which make it possible to crop a given area of land more frequently than before. Thus increased population pressure results in a shift from forest fallow, to bush, then grass fallow, annual and finally multi-cropping.


How is agricultural production intensified?

Agricultural intensification refers to two general processes: (1) changes in the vegetation diversity in an agroecosystem (including crop species and varieties and other vegetation components such as trees, trap crops, and weeds) and (2) changes in management practices and intensity of production including soil


How does intensification of agriculture harm natural resources?

It also increases plant productivity and soil quality. Agricultural intensification is associated with loss of biodiversity; agroforestry is increasingly defined as an integrated land use that can directly increase plant diversity and also reduce habitat loss and fragmentation (Noble and Dirzo 1997).


When did agriculture intensify?

Cultivated areas increased more slowly than world population between 1970 and 2005, but actual declines in cultivated area occurred infrequently at global, regional, and national scales. The most common pattern involved simultaneous increases in agricultural yields and cultivated areas.


What are examples of extensive farming?

Intensive = market gardening, mixed crop/livestock, plantation agriculture.


Which farming requires a lot of care?

intensive agriculture, also known as intensive farming (as opposed to extensive farming ) and industrial agriculture, is a type of agriculture, both of crop plants and animals, with higher levels of input and output per cubic unit of agriculture land area, so intensive farming requires a lot of care.


Why is agricultural intensification important?

Intensification that takes the form of increased production is most critical when there is a need to expand the food supply, for example during periods of rapid population growth. Intensification that makes more efficient use of inputs may be more critical when environmental problems or social issues are involved.


How does intensification affect agriculture?

The effect of intensification on the amount of land under cultivation is more complex because it depends on accompanying policies, factor markets, and the spatial and temporal scale of analyses. The impact of these feedbacks and indirect effects on land conversion is relatively well studied, but they may also shape the impact of intensification on other environmental outcomes. A review of the literature helps organize existing results and suggests potential approaches to mitigating the environmental costs of agricultural intensification. Further research is needed to understand causal mechanisms and inform policies designed to meet production goals while minimizing environmental costs.


How does agricultural intensification affect the environment?

As described in the previous section, agricultural intensification can, in theory, have both positive and negative direct effects on the local environment. However, the current empirical literature points toward a range of suggestive (predominantly correlational) evidence linking agricultural intensification to negative environmental outcomes.3 This section focuses on direct effects; later sections return to indirect effects, including those that arise in general equilibrium. While land-use change and air and water pollution are the most researched areas of impact, agricultural intensification can affect many facets of the environment. This section is organized by impact area, broadly categorized into land use change, air and water pollution (including GHGs), biodiversity, soil fertility, and other factors including animal-borne diseases and human-wildlife conflict. We simplify a number of important considerations, including nonlinearities and irreversibilities that arise for some types of externalities. We leave these as topics for future discussion.


How can public policy help to mitigate the effects of agricultural intensification?

Public policy can allow governments to minimize the environmental harms from agricultural intensification, at least in expectation. A number of studies investigate whether policies can induce agricultural intensification and how those affect the environment; fewer have studied whether policy can also moderate the impact of intensification on environmental outcomes. The literature reviewed below highlights the potential of government policies to minimize the negative impacts of intensification. Existing evidence suggests that this potential depends on both the strength of government and the degree to which it prioritizes environmental quality.


How does land use affect the environment?

Land use change is perhaps the environmental impact area with the most causal evidence establishing agricultural intensification as a driving force. Not only is land use an impact itself, but it is also associated with a variety of additional environmental impacts. For example, the conversion of native ecosystems into agricultural land leads to increased greenhouse gas emissions (IPCC 2019) and is a major driver of species loss (e.g., Pimm and Raven 2000; Medan et al. 2011; Newbold et al. 2015). Expansion of agricultural activity may also lead to increased pollution levels, whether due to increased use of inputs or a loss of valuable ecosystem services (e.g., Ouyang et al. 2014; Rodriguez-Galiano et al. 2014; Polasky et al. 2011; Short 2013). To our knowledge, these effects on ecosystems and pollution have not—with the exception of GHGs—been directly linked to land use change due to agricultural intensification.

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