What is agricultural value chain development

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An agricultural value chain is defined as the people and activities that bring a basic agricultural product like maize or vegetables or cotton from obtaining inputs and production in the field to the consumer, through stages such as processing, packaging, and distribution.

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What is the agricultural value chain?

  • An international, or regional commodity market. …
  • A national or local commodity market or marketing system such as “the Ghanaian tomato value chain” or “”the Accra tomato value chain”;
  • A supply chain, which can cover both of the above;

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What are some examples of value added agriculture?

  • increased consumer demands regarding health, nutrition and convenience;
  • efforts by food processors to improve their productivity; and
  • technological advances that enable producers to produce what consumers and processors desire.

What is an example of a business value chain?

  • Inbound logistics: Building close relationships with coffee-bean suppliers from around the world and obtaining the best prices.
  • Operations: Operating more than 30,000 stores in 83 countries. …
  • Outbound logistics: Selling products in stores and through licensed dealers using point-of-sale systems, the Starbucks mobile app, and Starbucks cards.

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What is an example of a global value chain?

Global value chains (GVCs) refer to international production sharing, a phenomenon where production is broken into activities and tasks carried out in different countries. They can be thought of a large-scale extension of division of labour dating back to Adam Smith’s time. In the famed example attributed to Smith, the production of a pin was divided into a number of distinct operations …

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What is the meaning of agricultural value chain?

A ‘value chain’ in agriculture identifies the set of actors and activities that bring a basic agricultural product from production in the field to final consumption, where at each stage value is added to the product.


What is agricultural chain development?

The Agricultural Value Chain Development Project (AVDP) will increase production and improve the marketing of rice, palm oil, cocoa and vegetables, contributing to the Government’s priorities of rice self-sufficiency, crop diversification and rural poverty reduction.


What is the value chain development?

In the Private Sector Development community, ‘Value Chain Development’ (VCD) refers to an approach which takes a product or commodity as the basis for analysis; most often, the product is agriculture-based.


What is the importance of value chain in agriculture?

High value chains can contribute to food security in the dimensions of access, availability and quality of food primarily by the increase of production volumes, farm diversification, generating higher incomes, reducing postharvest losses, and upgrading technologies to use more efficiently natural resources and …


What are the types of agricultural value chain?

Value chains may include a wide range of activities, and an agricultural value chain might include: development and dissemination of plant and animal genetic material, input supply, farmer organization, farm production, post-harvest handling, processing, provision of technologies of production and handling, grading …


What is value chain with example?

A value chain is used to describe all the business activities it takes to create a product from start to finish (e.g., design, production, distribution, and so on). A value chain analysis gives businesses a visual model of these activities, allowing them to determine where they can reduce costs.


What are the common objectives of value chain development?

VCD seeks to enhance the functioning of the market system by analyzing it and devising inter- ventions to overcome bottlenecks and constraints in the chain. LED strategies identify the economic potential of a specific territory and empower local economic actors to take joint action for economic growth and job creation.


What is agribusiness and value chain management?

An agricultural value chain is defined as the people and activities that bring a basic agricultural product like maize or vegetables or cotton from obtaining inputs and production in the field to the consumer, through stages such as processing, packaging, and distribution.


What does value chain mean?

“The value chain describes the full range of activities that firms and workers do to bring a product from its conception to its end use and beyond. This includes activities such as design, production, marketing, distribution and support to the final consumer.


What is agriculture chain management?

Agribusiness, supply chain management (SCM) implies managing the relationships between the businesses responsible for the efficient production and supply of products from the farm level to the consumers to meet consumers’ requirements reliably in terms of quantity, quality and price.


Why is value chain important?

Value chains help increase a business’s efficiency so the business can deliver the most value for the least possible cost. The end goal of a value chain is to create a competitive advantage for a company by increasing productivity while keeping costs reasonable.


Who are actors in agricultural value chain?

The core, or primary, actors in agricultural value chains typically include input suppliers, primary producers also referred to as farmers, wholesalers (agents or traders) and processors, manufacturers, and retailers.


What is value chain development?

Value chain development interventions can focus on improving business operations at the level of producers, processors and other actors in the chain and/or the (contractual) relationships among them, flow of knowledge and information and innovation. Value chain development can also foster overall coordination in the chain;


What is value chain?

A value chain brings all the stakeholders engaged in the production system on a common platform to contribute their best, while ensuring fair deal and transparency. The value chain includes all the input suppliers, technology delivering agencies, scientists indirectly engaged in developing appropriate technologies and extension officers who are involved in capacity building and providing various services to farmers. The stakeholders involved in post-production activities are the agencies organising collection, grading, storage, transportation, processing and marketing of the produce. Agencies like financial institutions and market information centres are also part of the value chain. Efficient linkage of various stakeholders improves production, price realisation and profitability.


What is a VCC in Jharkhand?

ICCo and Jharkhand State Rural Livelihoods Mission (JSLPS) partnered to establish a joint Value Chain Cell (VCC) in 2013. This Cell was initiated to strengthen value chain perspective in Mahila Kisan Sasaktikaran Pariyojana (MKSP) being implemented in Jharkhand. A road-map was prepared to guide the functioning of VCC team. Implementation of Chilli Value Chain and Tamarind Value Chain was effectively carried out through the partnership. A business model and road map to scale up the Lac drive in the region was also prepared. The VCC also implemented ‘36 x 36 model’ especially designed for the marginal and ultra poor farmers for their all year round income, food and nutritional security. The VCC team also carried out a Millet Value Chain study. The platform set by VCC stood as a model that was appreciated by stakeholders including government, based on which new proposals from World Bank, UNDP and Annual Action Plan through NRLM were formulated and approved. These new projects envisaged to take up, upscale and replicate these value chains and livelihood activities with around 100,000 farmers in the next 5 years. This substantiated the clear acceptance of the ICCo Value Chain Cell in the livelihood sector.


What is Prachurya Agro?

Prachurya Agro Pvt. Ltd. (formerly Golden Broiler) is a Broiler Integrator company based out of Assam and is one of the emerging companies in the region. The company has 20,000 Contract Broiler Farming per month placement associated with 60 farmers. The company provides free extension advisory and input services to the farmers as a complete package, which includes general farm management practices and specific management practices related to chicks, feed and medication. Through ICCO’s AbB program, the company plans to start retail outlets which will be first of its kind in the region. The outlet will ensure supply of hygienically cut chicken. The plan is also to link the Company to microfinance companies to provide contract farmers with financial support towards infrastructure/ working capital. AbB has already supported the company to improve its accounting and book keeping through implementation of the finanace improvement project.


What is ICCo in agriculture?

ICCo is pursuing a market-oriented agricultural development strategy to increase agricultural production and improve the livelihoods of smallholders. An approach to development which puts at the centre the interrelatedness of actors in the value chain who – separated by time and space – gradually add value to products and services as they pass from one link in the chain to the next.


Why is agriculture important in India?

Growth and development of agricultural value chains for local and external markets can be considered as a powerful tool for poverty reduction and to fight against the challenge of food-security in developing countries like India. This particularly makes a strong case in India where farmers are able to produce agricultural products, such as fresh fruits and vegetables that have higher potential for value addition as compared to conventional crops, and if access is made available to processing, marketing and distribution, which could enhance the value of the final products.


What are the stakeholders involved in post production?

The stakeholders involved in post-production activities are the agencies organising collection, grading, storage, transportation, processing and marketing of the produce. Agencies like financial institutions and market information centres are also part of the value chain.


What is value chain in agriculture?

Photo by: Fintrac. A value chain is a set of linked activities that work to add value to a product; it consists of actors and actions that improve a product while linking commodity producers to processors and markets.


What are the activities of value chains?

Value chains may include a wide range of activities, and an agricultural value chain might include: development and dissemination of plant and animal genetic material, input supply, farmer organization, farm production, post-harvest handling, processing, provision of technologies of production and handling, grading criteria and facilities, cooling and packing technologies, post-harvest local processing, industrial processing, storage, transport, finance, and feedback from markets.


Why is information important in the value chain?

Information is especially important to all value chain actors and flows in two directions: markets inform producers of price, quantity and quality needs, product handling and technology options, while producers inform processors and markets on production quantities, locations, timing and production issues.


How is agriculture characterized in developing countries?

Agriculture in developing countries often is characterized by dual value chains operating in parallel for the same product: one informal or traditional, and the other formal or modern. Small holders are frequently involved in informal chains that deliver products to local middlemen and then to small local stores. Formal value chains can deliver the same product, usually in better or more uniform quality, from larger farms or more organized groups of small farmers to more commercial wholesalers and from there to supermarkets or exporters. This duality has been accentuated by the explosive growth of supermarkets in developing countries. It can limit many small producers to markets characterized by low-quality products, and low prices and low returns for them — hence a frequent concern is to find ways to integrate small producers into more modern value chains, both domestic and export-oriented.


Why is it important to improve value chains?

As these examples illustrate, finding ways to improve value chains can be very important for raising small holders’ incomes. Without being linked into markets they are condemned to produce only for subsistence — better markets can lift them out of poverty. But making this leap requires more knowledge, and many actors along the value chain can help supply this crucial ingredient.


How do value chains work?

Value chains work best when their actors cooperate to produce higher-quality products and generate more income for all participants along the chain, as opposed to the simplest kinds of value chains, in which producers and buyers exchange only price information — often in an adversarial mode. Value chains differ from supply chains, which refer to logistics: the transport, storage and procedural steps for getting a product from its production site to the consumer.


What are the problems farmers face in the value chain?

Farmers could expand their profits from these multiple potential markets if solutions were found for value chain issues such as: 1. Poor quality of seeds and varieties inappropriate for the various uses. 2. Poor quality of product at harvest, with grains of inconsistent size and coloration. 3.


What is the impact of value chain training?

A common and important impact across several of the value chain training sessions has been the improvement in relationships and collaborations.


What percentage of participants reported having a change in mindset related to the other actors in the value chain?

Interviews with participants and trainers involved in the various Value Chain training sessions reveal that 100% of the participants reported having a change in mindset related to the other actors in the value chain.


What is the impact of farmer organisations?

An important impact reported by several of the farmer organisations is that they have translated and incorporated value chain training materials into their own programmes.


Who said “We invited all our champion farmers – farmers that are lead farmers in our farm groups – to attend?

Alan Petersen said: “We invited all our champion farmers – farmers that are lead farmers in our farm groups – to attend the training and it was very good, very basic and to the point, it was appreciated by the farmers to see the value chain, our part in it as farmers and how important each link in the chain is.”


What is value chain development?

Value chain development (VCD), a relatively new approach to agricultural development, is gaining prominence and becoming the centerpiece of agricultural development strategies . The concept of value chains, which was developed in the 1960s and 1970s to aid the analysis of mineral exporting countries, became widely known and popularized in the 1980s as a business tool to analyze and assess upgrading of technologies and processes in individual firms before being applied more broadly to supply chains and distribution (Girvan, 1987; Porter, 1985; Kaplinsky, 2000). The original concept rests on the idea that a firm can develop strategies to improve and maintain its competitive advantage by disaggregating its core activities and quantifying the value of each activity (Stamm, 2004). This concept has been extended beyond individual firms to whole supply chains and distribution networks. It is a relatively new approach to agricultural development (Altenburg, 2007), although the thinking about entire chains from production to consumption and increasing the share of value captured by farmers is not new to agricultural development. However, VCD is increasingly being seen more specifically as an important approach to agricultural development that explicitly recognizes the role of the private sector and that agricultural markets and institutions rarely function efficiently. The emerging VCD-oriented approaches go somewhat further from interventions that develop input and outputs markets in general to making more focused interventions to improve the competitiveness of selected commodities.


Is soybean a cash crop?

As noted, the Government of Ghana has been emphasizing the production of rice and maize primarily to reduce imports. Soybean is emerging as a cash crop as farmers find it to be appropriate for soils that have lost fertility. The objective of this component is to examine the competitiveness of these 3 crops, which are important for the Feed the Future strategy. Data have already been collected from a sample of farmers in the northern part of the country and will be analyzed to help inform the GoG’s planned interventions around these 3 value chains. The analysis is currently underway and will be finished and disseminated in February.


What are the main crops in Nepal?

In these areas the major staples food crops grown are potato, maize, barley, wheat, and buckwheat are main food crops, cultivated on the preponderance of rainfed bari-lands. Beans (Phaseolus vulgaris) are the common pulse crop and are used extensively as dal and vegetable. Apple, walnut, almond, peach pear, plum are the important fruit crops, and as to horticulture cabbage, cauliflower, carrot, radish, potato green pea, tomato, and onion are the important off-season vegetable crops. The communities commonly collect MAPs of which sugandhawal, jatamansi (Nardostachys grandiflora), and panch aunle are some of the important NTFPs. Pine trees are the main forest trees. The farmers also keep sizable flocks of sheep and goat, as well yak and chauri.


What is the Department of Food Technology and Quality Control?

The Department of Food Technology and Quality Control (DFTQC) under MOAC is the GoN entity responsible for all matters related to food and product safety. It is the contact point for Sanitary and Phyto-Sanitary (SPS) with WTO. It has unit for fruit and vegetable processing and preservation, which is a training unit which currently needs to be up-graded; undertakes training and provides technical support to farmers and food processors. It also


Why is Nepal so competitive?

The reason is that Nepal lacks the necessary physical infrastructure, and the technical, managerial, and marketing skills necessary for competitive horticultural export development. There are impediments that have seriously contributed to increasing production and marketing costs and raising the levels of uncertainty and risk in the industry and, subsequently, to increasing production and marketing costs of these niche products and consequently reducing competitiveness.


Is there a demand for potato seed in Nepal?

120. There is a big demand for quality vegetable and potato seed grown in Nepal, both within the country and in other neighbouring countries like Bangladesh. This however does not apply to India because it is trying to protect its own seed industry. While the seed sector in Nepal is in its relative infancy, quite a lot of work has been done in the past, including efforts by the DFID funded Seed Sector Support Project (SSSP), UNDP‘s MEDEP, FAO and the WB District Seed Self-sufficiency Project (DISSPRO). Also involved is the FNCCI/AEC which has done a value chain analysis of the seed sector and the Seed Entrepreneurs Association of Nepal (SEAN) which is working with cooperatives and farmer organisations in seed production. Jumla is ideally suited to the production of high quality seed as a result of the dry climate and the low incidence of pest and diseases, however there are production problems with the need for high levels of field management and monitoring, and the importance of irrigation.


Is seed certified in Nepal?

160. None of the seed produced in Nepal is certified seed. In Nepal seed is only ―Truthfully Labelled‖ seed where the quality is declared by concerned trader/seed company and is not certified. Seed law stated that all seed should be at least Truthfully Labelled but is not properly enforced. There is weak plant quarantine in Nepal but strong quarantine in India, hence making it difficult to export seed to India as the latter does not accept Nepal certification. Unofficially seed goes however to India from Nepal in the name of food grains hence illegal trading exists. SAARC is mandated to try to harmonise the whole issue of seed testing. Seed testing lab in Kathmandu under MOAC is designated member of International Seed Testing Association (ISTA) which is for auditing the seed testing certificate. Phytosanitary certification with Plant Quarantine Office of DOA (import and export of seed). Quality control procedures in place but not followed and procedures not clear for some crops including vegetables. Seed quality control comes directly under the MOAC. The matter of intellectual property (IP) for seed varieties and other products needs to be addressed.

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