What is fallowing in agriculture

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fal·low

  1. Land left unseeded during a growing season.
  2. The act of plowing land and leaving it unseeded.
  3. The condition or period of being unseeded.

Full
Answer

What is the fallow system of farming?

Dryland farming is made possible mainly by the fallow system of farming, a practice dating from ancient times. Basically, the term fallow refers to land that is plowed and tilled but left unseeded during a growing season. The practice of…

What is fallowing and how does it work?

Fallowing, defined as arable land not under rotation that is set at rest for a period of time ranging from one to five years, is often the method of choice when it comes to water transfers in the Desert Southwest, where crop production is particularly water intensive due to climate, irrigation method and crop selection.

Why do farmers leave their land fallow?

‘Fallow’ periods were traditionally used by farmers to maintain the natural productivity of their land. The benefits of leaving land fallow for extended periods include rebalancing soil nutrients, re-establishing soil biota, breaking crop pest and disease cycles, and providing a haven for wildlife.

What is the history of fallowing?

Early in the history of fallowing, farmers usually did a two-field rotation, meaning they would divide their field into two halves. One half would be planted with crops, the other would lie fallow. The following year, farmers would plant crops in the fallow land, while letting the other half rest or fallow.

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why do people practice fallow farming?

People practice fallow farming for so many reasons but for the sake of this post I will center on a few of the reason for engaging in fallow farming. The reasons are not limited to the under listed.


problems facing the practice of fallow farming

It important to note that no matter the advantages of anything, there will be ways whereby that activity will have challenges. So with this notion in mind I am going to list few problems facing the practice of fallow farming agriculture.


Why do swidden horticulturalists encroach on more distant land?

Since the fallowing periods of the plots are much longer than the planted periods, the swidden horticulturalists must gradually encroach on more distant land. Sometimes this results in semisedentary villages when the newly arable plots finally are so distant that a few horticulturalists must start to build…


What is dryland farming?

Basically, the term fallow refers to land that is plowed and tilled but left unseeded during a growing season.


What is a fallow in ecology?

The fallow is the temporal equivalent of facilitative biodiversity, i.e., fallows are non-productive periods that leave essential elements in abundance for the upcoming agroecosystem. Much can be expected, especially if a fallow has no productive role and can be fully committed to the ecological tasks as assigned.


Why do cash crops fallow?

The fallow period between two cash crops is a key period to break the cycles of weeds and pathogens that can’t survive long without a suitable host. Cover crop species are also susceptible to pathogens and must be chosen to avoid the hosting of pathogens that would otherwise decline during bare fallow periods.


What is a key provision for a planted fallow?

A key provision for a planted fallow is the cost . It is a fairly simple cost-benefit analysis, the costs of an intensely managed fallows must be kept well below the benefits obtained, the benefits being yield increases or the fallow as a substitute for ex-farm chemicals, e.g., fertilizers, insecticides, etc. 6.


How long does it take for fallows to restore soil fertility?

6.5.1.1 Improved Fallows. Traditional fallows, as used in the shifting cultivation, take several years to restore soil fertility. Often, natural vegetation is slow in reaching the peak of decomposition for biological productivity.


Why is it important to use more fallows?

Although the use of more frequent fallows is necessary for sustainable management of soil fertility , more fallows means reduction in land area under crop production for a fast growing population with high demand for food and high pressing on land resources. View chapter Purchase book. Read full chapter. …


How do leguminous trees convert nitrogen?

Leguminous trees also convert atmospheric nitrogen to usable forms of nitrogen through the nitrogen fixation in root nodules. At the end of the fallow period, the trees are harvested and the biomass that is not useful as fuel wood is returned to the soil. View chapter Purchase book. Read full chapter.


What is fallow land?

Fallow land is a land that is left uncultivated between planting seasons in order to allow the soil to regenerate and regain its minerals lost. In general terms fallow means a field where nothing in growing or land left not to be cultivated presumptuously


What is bush fallowing?

Bush fallowing is a system of subsistence agriculture in which land is cultivated for a period of time and then left uncultivated for several years so that its fertility-soil can be restored.


What is the fallowing period?

THIS PERIOD OF REST IS CALLED FALLOW PERIOD. Bush fallowing can also be known as shifting cultivation Which following which following which following processes is which following processes is a natural way of enriching the soil that is naturally lacking in soil nutrient a place where Bush fallowing is carried out for is that the land …


What are the main sources of labor in agriculture?

1. It is mainly practiced by peasant farmers or poor farmers.#N#2. It involves the use of crude implements like cutlass and hoe#N#3. The family is the main sources of labor input to the farm#N#4. It is common in rural areas with abundant farmlands#N#5. Productivity per unit of land or per unit of labor is low#N#6. Food crops like yam, maize, cassava etc. are grown#N#7. Farmlands are left to fallow after one planting season#N#8. It uses slash or burn method for land preparation


Why is it important to understand the mechanisms driving improvements in soil quality following fallowing?

Therefore, it is important that growers and land managers understand the mechanisms driving improvements in soil quality following fallowing, as these fluctuations may require a change in soil management strategies. Furthermore, additional irrigation water is needed to leach salts that accumulate during the fallow period. …


How long does it take for a desert to fallowing?

Fallowing, defined as arable land not under rotation that is set at rest for a period of time ranging from one to five years, is often the method of choice when it comes to water transfers in the Desert Southwest, where crop production is particularly water intensive due to climate, irrigation method and crop selection.


How can producers reduce salinity buildup?

Such an increase in soil salinity would be of concern, but producers can reduce salinity buildup by applying excess (5-20 percent) irrigation water to leach salts from the soil.


Is land fallowing good for agriculture?

Studies have shown that land fallowing is beneficial to soil quality, crop production and overall long-term sustainability. Therefore, land fallowing associated with ag-to-urban water transfers can be viewed as a sustainable land management practice that can be employed to reverse some of the negative effects of continued soil cultivation.


Does fallowing increase salinity?

The study found that short-term fallowing had increased the quantity of carbon, or soil organic matter, and nitrogen, However, it was also found that fallowing increased salinity by approximately 35 percent in PVID soils. Such an increase in soil salinity would be of concern, but producers can reduce salinity buildup by applying excess …

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