What is furrowing in agriculture

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What Is A “Furrow” (in Agriculture)?

  • Description. In agriculture, a furrow is a trench or groove made on the soil surface by a hoe, a beast of burden-pulled plow, or a tractor, wherein seeds are sown …
  • Agronomic Application of Furrows. …
  • Crops Best Suited to Furrows. …
  • Furrow Gradient in Land Surface. …
  • Tilling Former Crops Back Under. …
  • Practical Application of Tilling Residue Into Furrows. …

Description. In agriculture, a furrow is a trench or groove made on the soil surface by a hoe, a beast of burden-pulled plow, or a tractor, wherein seeds are sown and fertilizer is placed before its furrow is closed up.

Full
Answer

What is a furrow in agriculture?

A furrow is a shallow trench that is dug into the soil for planting seeds or seedlings. Historically, furrows were created using only a hand hoe. Nowadays, commercial farmers produce long furrows across a field using a furrower, which is a mechanical digger.

What is the role of the sow in farrowing management?

Both sows and piglets are involved in farrowing management. The sow must be managed so that she provides nutrition to her nursing litter while maintaining a health status that allows continued productivity in future breeding cycles. It is important to consider environmental control that keeps both sow and litter comfortable.

What is farrowing in pigs?

Farrowing is a term specific to swine that refers to the action of giving birth. Another general term for this is parturition. Farrowing management begins months before piglets are born.

What crops can be irrigated by a furrow?

Other crops suited for furrow irrigation are maize (corn), oilseeds such as sunflower, sugarcane, rice, wheat, and soybeans. Crops grown through furrow irrigation are more tolerant to excessive watering than those irrigated on flat land due to improved re-aeration of the soil after the furrow is drained.

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What are furrows in farming?

Furrows are small, parallel channels, made to carry water in order to irrigate the crop. The crop is usually grown on the ridges between the furrows (Figures 23 and 24).


What is the purpose of furrowing?

Planting in furrows allows for more uniform rows. These rows are able to be weeded and irrigated simply and without the concern of disturbing growing plants. Irrigation furrows have also been celebrated for their ability to help maintain soil moisture and to improve water use during periods of drought.


What is furrow land?

The furrow system is used for row crops such as corn (maize), cotton, sugar beets, and potatoes. Furrows are plowed between crop rows and the water is run in the furrows. In either type of surface irrigation systems, waste-water ditches at the lower edge of the…


What is furrow method?

Furrow irrigation is a method where water is applied to furrows using small discharges to favour water infiltration while advancing down the field.


Why do farmers use furrows?

A furrow may also be dug to move water in irrigation systems. Furrow irrigation is suited for large- and small-scale farmers alike, though there is much labor when there is little investment for the use of mechanized means of creating such systems.


Why is furrow irrigation good?

Advantages to furrow irrigation include lower initial investment of equipment and lower pumping costs per acre-inch of water pumped. Disadvantages include greater labor costs and lower application efficiency compared to sprinkler and subsurface drip irrigation.


What is ridge and furrow agriculture?

Abstract. Ridge and furrow is an archaeological pattern of ridges and troughs used in Europe, frequently associated with communal open-field farming and strip cultivation. Strip farming spread throughout Europe in the Middle Ages but appears to have only slightly penetrated southern Europe.


What is a furrow plough?

Definition of ‘to plough a furrow’ If you say that someone ploughs a particular furrow or ploughs their own furrow, you mean that their activities or interests are different or isolated from those of other people. [British] Cale has ploughed a more esoteric furrow as a recording artist.


What is ridge and furrow plowing?

Ridge and furrow is a term used to describe the earthen ridges and troughs that are created by the action of prolonged ploughing, which caused soil to build up in regularly spaced ridges along the length of a field. Typically, this was a method of cultivation characteristic of the medieval period and later.


How do you furrow a field?

0:392:59What is ridge and furrow – YouTubeYouTubeStart of suggested clipEnd of suggested clipSo what do you get these a gradual reaching up as you get run around around towards the middle. TheMoreSo what do you get these a gradual reaching up as you get run around around towards the middle. The ridges are always a standard width in any field system so they’re usually either.


What is the difference between furrow and basin irrigation?

What is the difference between FURROW and BASIN IRRIGATION?? Furrow irrigation is a mode in which furrows or channels are made on the ground and are then flooded with water. Basin irrigation is the simplest mode in which bunds of soil are made as a border all around the field and the field is then flooded with water.


Where are the furrows plowed?

Furrows are plowed between crop rows and the water is run in the furrows. In either type of surface irrigation systems, waste-water ditches at the lower edge of the….


What is the term for a trench that is plowed across a field?

…it cuts a trench, or furrow, throwing to one side a ribbon of soil that is called the furrow slice. When plowing is started in the middle of a strip of land, a furrow is plowed across the field; on the return trip, a furrow slice is lapped over the…


What Does Furrow Mean?

A furrow is a shallow trench that is dug into the soil for planting seeds or seedlings.


Maximum Yield Explains Furrow

Once a furrow has been dug, a gardener can direct sow the seeds into the soil of the furrow and then lightly cover up the seeds with soil.


What is a swine farrowing?

Farrowing Management. Farrowing is a term specific to swine that refers to the action of giving birth. Another general term for this is parturition. Farrowing management begins months before piglets are born.


How often do pigs arrive at Farrowing?

Farrowing Attendance. Once delivery begins pigs can be expected to arrive about every 15 minutes. Sometimes delivery timing is slower and sometimes two pigs will arrive at the same time. About half of the pigs will arrive head first and half tail first.


What is sow management in nursing?

Sow Management During Nursing. Much of sow management during nursing revolves around feed and water. The sow should receive as much as she will eat of a high-energy lactation diet. The feed must allow the sow to maintain her own body demands while providing nourishment for the entire growing litter.


How old do pigs have to be to be weaned?

However, many smaller farms wean pigs after 28 days of age and pigs can be successfully weaned at up to six weeks of age.


How long do piglets stay in the farrowing unit?

They stay in the unit during farrowing and until artificial weaning of the litter, which typically takes place between 2 and 5 weeks after farrowing. The time of weaning may be controlled by welfare regulation (see later in the chapter). As soon as the piglets are weaned by moving them away from the sow, she will return to the mating unit to start a new reproductive cycle. Otherwise, she may at this point be culled due to age, disease, reproductive problems or poor maternal performance. In countries using high prolific sow lines, the litters may be too large for the mother sow to nurse by herself. This has led to the use of so-called nurse sows that first give birth and nurse their own offspring for 7–21 days and then are given 2–7-day-old surplus piglets from another sow to nurse until weaned. This system is routinely used, for example in Denmark, where the average litter size has reached more than 17 piglets due to intensive selection for large litter size. These nurse sows will stay for a prolonged period in the farrowing unit.


How many piglets will a sow farrow?

A majority of sows will farrow at least 5 piglets and expel the placentas soon after the last piglet is born.


What are the production systems of swine?

The intensive swine industry uses several production systems, but all consist of farrowing, nursery, growing, and finishing units, with the latter two frequently combined into one unit. On some farms, all units are used in a continuous production system, preventing the use of an all-in/all-out system and thorough cleaning of the facilities. Other systems use fully separated facilities and the grower/finishing units may be completely different farms than the farrowing/nursery farms. Piglets are moved to nursery units after weaning at approximately 3 weeks of age, which is also the prime time for vaccinations by injection. In some instances a booster vaccination is given at 6 weeks of age. Sows can be vaccinated between 2 and 5 weeks before farrowing to increase antibodies in the colostrum. Although most vaccines are given by injection, attenuated live strains of bacteria (Lawsonia intracellularis causing ileitis and Salmonella and E. coli causing diarrhea) can be given in the drinking water. Over the past 20 years, two important new diseases have appeared worldwide in swine: PCV serotype 2 (PCV2) causing immunosuppression and wasting pigs, and porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS) caused by Arterivirus. Recombinant vaccines have been developed against PCV2 using VLP (Merck), a recombinant protein produced in a baculovirus system (Boehringer Ingelheim) or a recombinant hybrid inserting the VP2 gene of PCV2 into the genome of the nonpathogenic PCV serotype 1 virus (Zoetis). The latter is the only live vaccine against PCV2. Development of vaccines against PRRS is problematic for several reasons ( Cruz et al., 2010 ). Natural infection or attenuated vaccines induce weak innate immune responses and low levels of VN antibodies and virus-specific CTL. Moreover, PRRSV strains are highly diverse, especially for the immunodominant protein GP5. It is also suggested that CTL responses are more important for protective immunity than VN antibodies. Development of recombinant vaccines inducing strong CTL responses may solve the shortcomings of the current vaccines. Cruz et al. (2010) used a vectored vaccine with transmissible gastroenteritis virus as the backbone expressing two PRRSV antigens eliciting strong VN antibody and CTL responses as well as good mucosal immunity. Currently, this type of recombinant vaccine has not been licensed.


Can you give oxytocin to a sow?

Exogenous injections of oxytocin will have the same effect. The practitioner should never give injections of oxy tocin without first performing a manual examination of the birth canal. Giving oxytocin to a sow with a closed cervix or an obstructive dystocia is ineffective and possibly dangerous.

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