What is milking machine in agriculture

Milking Machine and other Dairy Farming Equipment

  • Milking Machine. Milking machine is used to extract milk from dairy cattle. Milking is done with the help of a motor.
  • Chaff Cutter. It is a machine used for cutting fodder. …
  • Fodder Grinder. Farm products are usually reduced in sizes by cutting or crushing operations. …

Automatic milking is the milking of dairy animals, especially of dairy cattle, without human labour. Automatic milking systems (AMS), also called voluntary milking systems (VMS), were developed in the late 20th century. They have been commercially available since the early 1990s.

Full
Answer

What is a milking machine?

The milking machine is a nearly automatic machine installation for milking cows. It is not a single unit, but rather an assembly of components designed to handle as many as 200 cows an hour.

What is kisankraft milking machine equipment?

Visit our website to know about KisanKraft Milking Machine Equipment. It is a machine used for cutting fodder. The fodder is fed into the machine and then it is gripped between two toothed rollers, which allow and pass it forward to a shear plate, where it is chopped into short lengths by rotating knives, mounted on a heavy flywheel.

What is Mfg in milking system?

In milking systems, the milk is mixed with air, especially when air is used as a transport medium for the milk. The stability of the MFG is lowered by mixing with air or any other gas during pumping or agitation of the milk.

How is milking carried out?

Milking is carried out mechanically in commercial flocks. Milking machines are similar to those used for dairy cows except that the vacuum level is set at 10 lb (4.5–5 kg) and the clusters are specialized units each with two lightweight teat cups. Milking is normally carried out in a parlor, which may be of static or rotary design.


What is the meaning of milking machine?

Definition of milking machine : a mechanical suction apparatus for milking cows.


What are the milking equipment?

Milking clusters.Milking liners.Milking claws.Milk meters.Milking hoses.Milk pumps.Cluster detachers.Milking pulsators.More items…


What is milking in agriculture?

Milking is the act of removing milk from the mammary glands of cattle, water buffalo, humans, goats, sheep, and, more rarely, camels, horses and donkeys. Milking may be done by hand or by machine, and requires the animal to be currently or recently pregnant.


What is the importance of milking machine?

The milking machine performs two basic functions. It opens the streak canal through the use of a partial vacuum, allowing the milk to flow out of the teat cistern through a line to a receiving container. It massages the teat, which prevents congestion of blood and lymph in the teat.


How do you make a milk machine?

7:3413:05Best DIY Milk Machine For your Homestead or Dairy Farm! – YouTubeYouTubeStart of suggested clipEnd of suggested clipAnd do two goats at a time. So that’s the vacuum pump. So these are the parts and pieces you’reMoreAnd do two goats at a time. So that’s the vacuum pump. So these are the parts and pieces you’re gonna need to make the milk machine that i’ve made. This is three quarter inch regular pvc.


How do you set up a milking machine?

0:313:04How to assembly your cow and goat milking machine – YouTubeYouTubeStart of suggested clipEnd of suggested clipBe sure to connect the two hoses. One is coming directly from your air tank all the way to your lid.MoreBe sure to connect the two hoses. One is coming directly from your air tank all the way to your lid. The other hose is your milk house that is going directly to your milking cluster.


What is the milking process?

The milking process consists of two phases of a pulsation cycle. Pulsation is defined by the International Standards Organization (ISO) as movement of the liner wall. The internal liner moves to an open position known as the milking phase and then to closure or the rest phase (Figure 15).


What is milking technique?

Hand Milking Milking is done either by stripping or by full hand method. Stripping is done by firmly holding the teat between the thumb and fore finger and drawing it down the length of the teat and at the same time pressing it to cause the milk to flow down in a stream.


What are the 4 types of milking methods?

Lesson 9. METHODS OF MILKINGStripping method.Full hand method.Knuckling method.Machine milking.


Who invented the milking machine?

Anna Baldwen, a New Jersey farmer, invented and patented the first milking machine in the United States, known as the “Hygienic Glove Milker” 1879, which was also one of the first American patents listed.


How do you maintain a milking machine?

Milking machine checksCheck the vacuum level. Teats can be damaged when the vacuum isn’t at the correct level. … Listen to the pulsators. … Check air admission holes are clear. … Check teats as cups come off. … Check cow behaviour. … Check for twisted liners. … Check filters on pulsator airlines. … Listen to the regulator.More items…


What equipment do dairy farmers use?

Some of the most common milking equipment used to increase the efficiency of dairy farming include automatic milk detachers and teat spray robots (TSR). When it comes to milk cooling and storage, there are closed-loop water systems, mat vats, plate coolers, tanks, and silos.


What is a milking machine?

Modern milking machines are capable of milking cows quickly and efficiently, without injuring the udder, if they are properly installed, maintained in excellent operating conditions, and used properly. The milking machine performs two basic functions.


How does a milking machine work?

The milking machine performs two basic functions. It opens the streak canal through the use of a partial vacuum, allowing the milk to flow out of the teat cistern through a line to a receiving container. It massages the teat, which prevents congestion of blood and lymph in the teat.


What should be the training for milkers?

The training should include introduction procedures, milking routine, handling of the machine, cleaning and maintenance as well as certain aspects of the day-to-day service of the machine.


Why do buffaloes need to be familiar with milking machines?

The milkers and buffaloes must be familiar with the machines. If the buffaloes are scared or feel uncomfortable they will withhold the milk and thereby yield less. This in turn will lead to economic loss for the farmer and eventually he will loose his faith in machine milking.


How to make cattle accustomed to the sound of milk?

Milk the old and selected animals as usual by hand but let the vacuum pump run during milking. This will make the animals accustomed to the noise. Put the pump on before actual milking, but after the cattle have been tied up, otherwise the animals may be startled by the sudden noise. Repeat the procedure (usually 2 to 4 times) until all cattle are accustomed to the noise.


When was milking first used?

Suction was first used as a basis for the mechanized harvesting of milk in 1851, although the attempts were not altogether successful, drawing too much blood and body fluid congestion within the teat. To encourage further innovations, the Royal Agricultural Society of England offered money for a safe, working milking machine. Around the 1890s Alexander Shiels of Glasgow, Scotland, developed a pulsator that alternated suction levels to successfully massage the blood and fluids out of the teat for proper blood circulation. That device, along with the development of a double-chambered teatcup in 1892, led to milking machines replacing hand milking. After the 1920s machine milking became firmly established in the dairy industry. Today, the majority of all milking is processed by machine.


What is the purpose of a cluster in a cow’s milking system?

The cluster consists of teatcups, a shell and liner device that actually performs the milking action, and a claw or manifold that spaces the teatcups and connects them to the milk and pulse tubes. The milk tube carries the milk and air mixture away from the cow’s udder to receiving tanks. The pulse tube, or airline, carries the varying air pressure from the pulsator device to the tanks, drawing the milk and fluids out of the cows as well.


Who wrote the book “A Robot to Milk Cows”?

Wittenberg, Gunter. “A Robot to Milk Cows.” The Industrial Robot, 1993, pp. 22-25.


Who wrote “Milking Automation for All It’s Worth”?

Blankesteijn, Herbert and Daniel Clery. “Milking Automation for All It’s Worth.” New Scientist, February 1, 1992, p. 27.


Is robotic milking a technology?

Robotics are at the forefront of milking technology, especially in Europe. Automatic attachment devices have been created but not quite perfected. This new innovation will require little manual labor, and the machines will oversee much of the milking process from the time a cow enters a milking center until it leaves to graze.


What is milking machine?

Milking machine is used to extract milk from dairy cattle. Milking is done with the help of a motor. The vacuum pump produces a suction that is transmitted by a pipeline to the milking unit. This suction process is continuous.


Why is dairy farming important?

Dairy farming is a part of agriculture for long term production of milk, it is used to prepare dairy products for sale. Dairy farming can be a stable source of income to balance the unpredictability of crop income. Milking machines add more value to this farming.


What is the purpose of a grinder?

The farmer can use this type of agricultural machine called grinder to process livestock feed from grain. Grinding of ingredients generally improves feed digestibility and acceptability.


What is the name of the device that connects the rubber lining to the metal walls?

A device called Pulsator connects alternately to the space between the metal walls and the rubber lining, first with the atmosphere and then with the suction. When the space between the liner and the metal walls is connected to the atmosphere, the liner collapses and extract the milk.


How does a shear plate work?

The fodder is fed into the machine and then it is gripped between two toothed rollers, which allow and pass it forward to a shear plate, where it is chopped into short lengths by rotating knives, mounted on a heavy flywheel. Then chopped fodder will drop from the machine.


What are milking machines made of?

Milking machine components are created using stainless steel and plastic for containers and liners, and cast iron and steel for vacuum pumps, controls, and metering devices. At this point, the stainless steel from the foundry has a dull finish.


How many cows can a milking machine handle?

It is not a single unit, but rather an assembly of components designed to handle as many as 200 cows an hour. The system consists of the cluster (the assembly that is manually attached to the cow), a milk tube, a pulse tube and pulsator, a vacuum pump or blower, and perhaps a recorder jar or milk meter that measures yield. Together, the system allows milk to flow into a pipeline in preparation for shipping to a processing plant.


How is milk drawn from cows?

In operation, milk is drawn from the cow’s teats because a vacuum is created within the cup device, forcing the milk through the teat canal. The pulsator alternates the pressure, first creating a vacuum (milk phase), and then applying air, which causes the flexible liner in the cup to collapse and massage the teat (rest phase). …


What is the purpose of a milk tube?

The milk tube carries the milk and air mixture away from the cow’s udder to receiving tanks. The pulse tube, or airline, carries the varying air pressure from the pulsator device to the tanks, drawing the milk and fluids out of the cows as well. In operation, milk is drawn from the cow’s teats because a vacuum is created within the cup device, …


What is an automatic detacher?

Automatic detacher units that connect loosely to the milking claw allow cows to move and shift freely during milking. Based on the rate of milk flow, the detacher can also detect the end of milking, shutting the vacuum and actually removing the claw from the cow.


When was milking first used?

, Egyptians, along with traditional milking-by-hand, inserted wheat straws into cows’ teats. Suction was first used as a basis for the mechanized harvesting of milk in 1851, although the attempts were not altogether successful, drawing too much blood and body fluid congestion within the teat. To encourage further innovations, the Royal Agricultural Society of England offered money for a safe, working milking machine. Around the 1890s Alexander Shiels of Glasgow, Scotland, developed a pulsator that alternated suction levels to successfully massage the blood and fluids out of the teat for proper blood circulation. That device, along with the development of a double-chambered teatcup in 1892, led to milking machines replacing hand milking. After the 1920s machine milking became firmly established in the dairy industry. Today, the majority of all milking is processed by machine.


How many gallons of milk does a milk receiver hold?

4 Receiver tanks are stainless steel tanks that receive milk from the milk lines, generally holding from 15-26 gallons (60-100 1). Although some are customized plastic, most are steel with the heads or ends spun on specialty machines. This production technique shapes a thin steel disc as it is being turned in a lathe. The disc is shaped as it is forced over a steel shape or mandrel. Once the operator forms the ends of the receiver as cups, another technician will weld the body to the head, leaving orifices or openings for milk input and output. Individually manufactured, the receivers will also be polished by hand. Some receivers will have translucent plastic panel inserts so that dairy farmers can visually gauge the cow’s milk production.


Why is milking machine important?

Milking machines in poor condition or poorly adjusted cause cow discomfort and teat damage. Cows enter a well-lit open milking facility more easily than a closed-in dark facility.


When did rotary milking start?

Rotary milking systems have been popular since 1970 in Australia and New Zealand particularly for herds of over 250 cows. Various types have been constructed including the carousel (or rotary tandem), rotary herringbone and, by far the most popular, the turnstyle (or rotary abreast).


What are some practices that should be avoided in milking?

Milking practices that should be avoided include overmilking and undermilking, claw removal under vacuum, and vigorous udder massage or stripping. Overmilking will promote teat end hyperkeratosis and subsequent bacterial colonization; undermilking can increase udder sensitivity to bacterial pathogens. 1 In dairy cattle, milkout and milk letdown are directly influenced by the teat prep process and timing. In sheep or goats, however, milk letdown is not closely dependent on the teat preparation process, because most of the milk (more than 50% in dairy sheep and 80% in goats) is stored in the gland cistern, rather than the gland alveoli. 3,6 Impact events such as claw removal under vacuum, vigorous udder massage, and machine stripping transmit mastitis through retrograde entry of infected milk and surface bacteria into the teat. 1


How does milking affect udder health?

Milking practices and the milking system may have a critical impact on udder health by causing mechanical insult or by providing bacterial reservoirs in dirty equipment. Producers are advised to implement a milking order whereby primiparous and nonmastitic animals are milked first.


What does “more milk” mean?

More milk means that the costs of milking per kilogram of milk will decrease. The same applies to the labour costs per kilogram milk. Theoretically, with an AM system more cows can be kept with the same labour force compared with the traditional milking system.


Can you milk with an AM system?

However, quite often, that does not happen and the time saved as a result of lower labor requirement will be used for personal activities: sports, family life, and other activities. Without doubt, milking with an AM system instead of a traditional milking parlor will have significant economical and social consequences.


Is AM milking system profitable?

Economical results from commercial farms show that the use of AM systems in general is profitable, highly depending on the extra milk yield and labor savings. A Dutch case–control study of farms with AM systems and farms with conventional milking systems showed no differences in margin, although fixed costs for the AM farms were higher. AM farms saved 29% labor, and therefore when economical results were transformed to full-time equivalents (FTEs), AM farms in the case–control study had greater revenues, margins, and gross margins per FTE than the farms with conventional milking systems. So when deciding between investment in an AM system and in a conventional milking system, dairy farmers must weigh decreased labor needs for the AM system against the increased fixed costs of milking with an AM system. Therefore, in many cases, adoption of an AM system is for many dairy farmers a socioeconomic decision, rather than just a purely economic decision.


Why do you clean a milking machine?

The milking machine is cleaned after each milking if done manually or in case of automatic milking system at regular intervals, to remove any remaining residues. In general, microorganisms which come from the farm environment are found on the surfaces of the equipment surfaces.


How does milking equipment get contaminated?

The level of contamination, however, depends largely on the cleaning procedure applied to the milking machine. The milking machine is cleaned after each milking if done manually or in case of automatic milking system at regular intervals, to remove any remaining residues. In general, microorganisms which come from the farm environment are found on the surfaces of the equipment surfaces. It has been observed that S. aureus has been recovered from the surface of milking equipment. Also, Gram-negative rods like coli forms and pseudomonas have also been noticed if the equipment is not maintained at low temperature or cleaned without sanitizers ( Beukes, 1999 ).


What are the sources of contamination in milk?

Other sources of contamination after the milk leaves include the tanker, truck, transfer, pipelines, vats, tanks, pumps, valves separator, clarifiers, homogenizers, coolers, strainers, stirrer, and filters . The paper stock used for packaging fluid milk can also serve as an important source of contamination.


Why is milk subject to antibiotic residue?

In a retrospective study of reasons for the presence of violative antibiotic residues in milk, failure to withhold milk for the full withdrawal period and accidental inclusion of treated milk in the shipment were the most common. Accidental inclusion of treated milk can occur when there is inadequate identification of treated cows. The veterinarian should work with the producer to establish a system that easily identifies cows whose milk is subject to a withholding period. Colored leg markers are one system and are immediately visible to the milker.


Why do we take swabs from milk lines?

Swabs are taken from clusters, rubber ware and milk lines in order to detect not only the presence of viable microorganisms, but also milk residues, giving accurate information about the total hygiene. The test method has potential value for troubleshooting and optimization of cleaning systems. The test procedure is simple now, thanks to …


Is raw milk safe?

Raw milk should be subject to routine monitoring for indicators of contamination, including E. coli or coliform bacteria. Where the raw milk is intended to be used in the manufacture of products without effective bacterial reduction processes, such as in the manufacture of raw milk cheeses, it is important to source milk from farms known to be operating very high standards of hygiene. The farmer should be aware of the intended use of the milk, and it is common for manufacturers of such raw milk products to utilise incentive payment schemes using E. coli counts as a measure of the hygienic status of the milk. Consistent supply of high-quality milk is rewarded with higher payment and poor-quality milk supply is penalised. It is clear that such approaches can achieve improved hygienic quality of the raw milk supply, but it is also important to recognise that this cannot guarantee the absence of pathogens from the raw milk supply since low-level or low-frequency contamination is inevitable from time to time. Other indicators of hygiene may also be relevant for such purposes; for example, Hutchison et al. (2005) reported that total mesophilic aerobic colony counts were better than other bacterial indicators of on-farm hygiene they examined when assessed against routine hygiene audit scores.


Is there a risk of residues in milk?

The risk for residues is higher for farms that have higher frequency of antibiotic usage and for those that use part-time labor. The use of records to document treatments and the day of exit from the withholding period is an important preventive measure. Sulfonamides, tetracyclines, penicillins, aminoglycosides, cephalosporin, and chloramphenicol have been found in milk in the United States.


What is a milking machine?

A milking machine is a device composed of several parts that, when properly assembled and supplied with a source of energy, will remove milk from an animal’s udder and transport milk to a storage vessel.


What is a milking system?

A well-designed system will harvest milk quickly and gently, make efficient use of labor, maintain animal udder health, and will be easy to clean and sanitize. Milking systems have specific requirements regarding slope of pipelines and physical relationships between animals and machines.


What should be done before milking animals?

Before milking the animals should be evaluated and the milk from each teat should be tested for visible defects. Regarding diseased animals (like animals with clinical mastitis) they should be segregated or milked last or milked by using a different milking equipment or by hand and should not be used for human consumption.


Why is it important to stimulate cows?

Stimulation prepares cows to release their milk and is important to reduce the time required to harvest milk. Reducing the time that milking units are attached to the cow will improve milking parlor efficiency and reduce teat tissue stress and associated mastitis risk.


How does milking affect the quality of milk?

This way previous cleaning of udder and teats, milkers’ hands, and milking area are the key to reducing contamination by spoilage and pathogenic microorganisms in milk and improve the end hygienic conditions . Steps of milking process are as follows ( FAO/WHO, 2004 ):


How to milk cows efficiently?

An effective and efficient milking process is as follows: Provide a clean, low-stress housing environment for cows. Maintain a consistent operating routine for bringing cows to the milking parlor and during the milking process. Check foremilk and udder for mastitis. Apply an effective premilking sanitizer to teats.


Why is automatic milking important?

Reduced labor, a better social life for dairy farm families, and increased milk yields due to more frequent milking are generally recognized as important benefits of automatic milking. Automatic milking changes, without doubt, many aspects of farm management since both the nature and organization of labor are altered.


What is a milk machine?

Generally used in the milk industry this machine separates cream and skimmed milk. Used to produce milk products its components are made from stainless steel, aluminum and plastic.


What is milk processing equipment?

Basic milk processing equipment are homogenizers, separators, pasteurizers and tanks. The primary equipment is the milking machines. There are different specifications, designs and functionality.


Why is it important to mechanize a milking parlor?

Mechanizing a milking parlor increases efficiency and number of cows milked simultaneously. Streamlining the process creates an assembly line, reduces stress and output. It also reduces labor and provides better time management.


How to determine the milking system for cattle?

The number of cattle will determine the milking system. Purchase quality equipment that are functional and efficient. Equipment that cut operational cost, time and labor should be considered. Things to look for are space, range of features, quicker output, automated or manual. Make sure the equipment has spare parts for easy replacement. The equipment should carry out processes such as pasteurizing, separating, milking and storage.


Why is automatic milking not ideal?

The automatic milker are not ideal devices because they over-milk the cows. It is essential to monitor the cows during the milking process. The process is quick and faster than manual milking.


Why is dairy farming labor intensive?

It is labor intensive because the cows are milked at least twice a day. The cattle are secured to a spot with a stanchion or rope. The farmer should maintain good hygiene, hand washing and use of buckets. things used in dairy farm.


What is the difference between homogenizers and tanks?

The tanks are storage facilities to preserve the product. While homogenizers are machinery used to separate immiscible liquids into emulsion. More equipment involve refrigeration, housing


What is automatic milking system?

To further release the duty and reduce labor cost from the (partially) manual milking, automatic milking systems had been developed and put into practice during the past two decades. The automatic milking system is also referred to as robotic milking system since the manual teat cup attachment movement is mimicked using the robotic arm, a key component in the automatic milking system ( Automatic Milking Systems, 2016 ). After the cows are trained (typically within 7 days), the milking robot is capable of (1) identifying the cow, (2) determining her milking status (some are even able to determine the silent heat of the cow and detect abortions and cysts), (3) dispensing the feed to the cow while she is milked, (4) evaluating the milk quality through multiple sensors installed, (5) making a record, and (6) raising alarms if needed. In an automatic milking system environment, cows can be milked 24/7 at her will and there is no need for a mandatory milk time during the day. It had been reported that with good management, the robotic milking production can be 3%–5% higher than the parlor milking (twice/day) ( Robotic Milking Systems, 2011 ). After the teats are located, cleaned, and teat cups attached, the milking begins; based on the milk flow from each quarter, the teat cups will be removed when milking is completed. During milking, a series of data is collected including the physicals of the cows (weight, quarter yield and quarter milk time, dead milk time, etc.) and the quality of the milk (temperature, color, conductivity, fat and protein content, somatic cell count, etc.).


When was the first milking robot invented?

In 1992 the first milking robot was installed on a commercial dairy farm in The Netherlands. At the end of 2001, at over 1100 farms worldwide, cows were milked automatically by an automatic milking (AM) system (Figure 1 ). It is generally expected that the number of farms worldwide with an AM system will grow.


What are the applications of robotics in dairy?

This article reviews the most relevant applications of robotics in the dairy industry: milking robots and palletizing robots. Robotics differ from simple automation by having sensors and programs that provide flexible actions that otherwise require human intervention, such as grabbing and handling objects of variable size and imprecise location. Milking robots imply a fully revised concept of herd and farm management that provides significant benefits for animal well-being and process efficiencies, with economics that need careful assessment. Palletizing robots are widespread in various industrial sectors and permit productivity gains and labor cost savings.


Why are robots used in agriculture?

Limited agriculture workforce due to urban migration, labor-intense workload, and high population rate of the world have instilled an expanding popularity for agriculture robots on a global scale. That is why robotics has jumped into the field of agriculture to provide effective solutions to laborious and time-consuming phases of agriculture, such as harvesting or plowing ( Bac et al., 2014). Agriculture robots can outcompete human intervention in terms of physical labor, constant work rates under a wide array of challenging environmental conditions, time management, and overall agricultural precision. Common examples of currently used global agricultural robots include driverless tractors, seeding and mowing robots, milking robots, and automated harvesting machines. The global market of agriculture robots was dominated by driverless tractors in 2015. Leading European and U.S. agricultural technology corporations have launched prototypes of full or partially autonomous tractors equipped with GPS-guided steering and sensors including radar, laser, and infrared imaging systems (Gan-Mor et al., 2007; Nieuwenhuizen et al., 2010; Pérez-Ruiz et al., 2012 ). Generally, autonomous and semiautonomous agricultural instruments (or robots) are capable of leading independent or semiindependent precision agricultural tasks when fitted with the required tools or utensils, generally called implements. Integration of a vehicle and a particular implement make up the mechanical structure of agricultural robotics, which are controlled by an external computer, manually controlled by human intervention or a self-learning program that coordinates the activities of the vehicle and the attached implements. Innovative architectural involvements are required for cost-effective and practical application of robotics ( Rovira-Más, 2010) on organic farms. Thus efficient design integrating the vehicle, specific implement, and a coordinating system makes up a reliable, efficient, and practical robotic system to be used in agriculture.


Background

  • The milking machine is a nearly automatic machine installation for milking cows. It is not a single unit, but rather an assembly of components designed to handle as many as 200 cows an hour. The system consists of the cluster (the assembly that is manually attached to the cow), a milk tube, a pulse tube and pulsator, a vacuum pump or blower, and pe…

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History

  • Early attempts at milking cows involved a variety of methods. Around 380 b.c., Egyptians, along with traditional milking-by-hand, inserted wheat straws into cows’ teats. Suction was first used as a basis for the mechanized harvesting of milk in 1851, although the attempts were not altogether successful, drawing too much blood and body fluid congestion within the teat. To encourage fur…

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The Manufacturing Process

  • The milking machine components are created and assembled in several major manufacturing plants throughout the world using traditional processes and procedures. Stainless steel and plastic are used for containers and liners and cast ironand steel for vacuum pumps, controls, and metering devices.

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Standards

  • Milking machine manufacturers are subject to a variety of standards, some self-imposed. In addition to inspections throughout the manufacturing process, all installations are set up by trained dealers and electrical contractors. Equipment designers follow Association of Agricultural Engineer standards and sanitary guidelines established by a dairy industry council.

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The Future

  • Advances in technology have introduced several new innovations to milking machines. Automatic detacher units that connect loosely to the milking claw allow cows to move and shift freely during milking. Based on the rate of milk flow, the detacher can also detect the end of milking, shuttingthe vacuum and actually removing the claw from the cow. Automatic backflushing unit…

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Where to Learn More

  • Books
    Machine Milking and Lactation.Insight Books, 1991. Maximizing the Milk Harvest.Milking Machine Manufacturers Council, 1993.
  • Periodicals
    Blankesteijn, Herbert and Daniel Clery. “Milking Automation for All It’s Worth.” New Scientist,February 1, 1992, p. 27. Spahr, Sid. “Coming: New Dairy Ideas from Europe and Israel.” Successful Farming,October 1987. Wittenberg, Gunter. “A Robot to Milk Cows.” The Industrial Ro…

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