What is range land in agriculture

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Rangelands are those lands on which the native vegetation (climax or natural potential plant community) is predominantly grasses, grass-like plants, forbs, or shrubs suitable for grazing or browsing use.Jan 19, 2022

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How many acres of land are in a rangeland?

In the contiguous 48 states, privately owned rangelands make up about 409 million acres, 27% of the total land area, and form the largest single land cover/use type. Rangelands provide a diversity of ecosystems and also provide a diverse and significant production of economic benefits and ecosystem goods and services.

What is agricultural land?

Agricultural land 1 ” arable land ” (also known as cropland): here redefined to refer to land producing crops requiring annual replanting or… 2 ” permanent cropland “: land producing crops which do not require annual replanting 3 permanent pastures: natural or artificial grasslands and shrublands able to be used for grazing livestock More …

What is a range in geography?

(Show more) rangeland, also called Range, any extensive area of land that is occupied by native herbaceous or shrubby vegetation which is grazed by domestic or wild herbivores. The vegetation of ranges may include tallgrass prairies, steppes (shortgrass prairies), desert shrublands, shrub woodlands, savannas, chaparrals, and tundras.

What percentage of the world’s land is agricultural land?

The Agricultural Land Reserve in British Columbia in Canada, for instance, requires approval from its Agricultural Land Commission before its lands can be removed or subdivided. Under the FAO ‘s definitions above, agricultural land covers 38.4% of the world’s land area as of 2011.

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What is the meaning of range land?

rangeland, also called range, any extensive area of land that is occupied by native herbaceous or shrubby vegetation which is grazed by domestic or wild herbivores.


What is a range in agriculture?

Range and pasture lands are diverse types of land where the primary vegetation produced is herbaceous plants and shrubs. These lands provide forage for beef cattle, dairy cattle, sheep, goats, horses and other types of domestic livestock.


What is the difference between rangeland and forest land?

Types of rangelands include tallgrass and shortgrass prairies, desert grasslands and shrublands, woodlands, savannas, chaparrals, steppes, and tundras. Rangelands do not include forests lacking grazable understory vegetation, barren desert, farmland, or land covered by solid rock, concrete and/or glaciers.


What is range vegetation?

“Land on which the vegetation is predominantly grasses, grass-like plants, forbs, or shrubs. Rangelands include natural grasslands, shrublands, woodlands, savannahs, tundra, most deserts, and riparian and wetland plant communities including marshes and wet meadows.


What is range land in animal husbandry?

A rangeland is a piece of land, usually large, on which the local or native vegetation mainly grass, or shrubs grow. A range is an extensive area of land which contains forage grasses and legumes and other herbage plants where animals like sheep, goats, cattle can graze.


What is rangeland used for?

Globally rangelands are used to raise livestock for food and fiber, harvest renewable and non-renewable energy and mineral resources, provide habitat for wildlife, and open space for human enjoyment and recreation.


Why is rangeland important?

Management Systems Rangelands are managed for forage production, water harvesting, recreation, and wildlife production. On rangelands, management is heavily focused on vegetation.


What are the characteristics of a range land?

Rangelands in the Region include natural grasslands consisting of either tall, short, medium, annual or desert species; savannahs both wet and dry; shrub-lands of various characteristics; alpine communities; coastal marshes; wet meadows and most deserts.


Where are the rangelands?

Rangelands in the United States are diverse lands. They are the wet grasslands of Florida to the desert shrub ecosystems of Wyoming. They include the high mountain meadows of Utah to the desert floor of California. The United States has about 770 million acres of rangelands.


What are rangeland resources?

The term ‘rangeland resources’ refers to biological resources within a specific rangeland and associated ecosystems, including vegetation, wildlife, open forests (canopy coverage less than 30%), non- biological products such as soil and minerals.


What causes rangeland?

Rangelands are described as lands on which the indigenous vegetation is predominately grasses, grass-like plants, forbs, and possibly shrubs or dispersed trees. Existing plant communities can include both native and introduced plants. Disturbed lands that have been revegetated naturally or artificially are included.


What is rangeland ecosystem?

Rangelands are vast, natural grasslands, shrublands, woodlands, wetlands, and deserts that support grazing and browsing mammals — domestic and/or wild. Rangelands are distinguished from pastures because they are primarily natural ecosystems with native vegetation rather than plants established by humans.


What is a rangeland?

Rangelands are described as lands on which the indigenous vegetation is predominately grasses, grass-like plants, forbs, and possibly shrubs or dispersed trees. Existing plant communities can include both native and introduced plants.


What are the benefits of a rangeland?

Rangelands provide a diversity of ecosystems and also provide a diverse and significant production of economic benefits and ecosystem goods and services. Livestock production along with sustainable wildlife populations provide for the major direct economic benefits, but also tourism, recreational uses, minerals/energy production, renewable energy, and other natural resource uses can be very significant. Vital ecosystem contributions include clean water, clean air, fish/wildlife habitat, as well as intangible considerations such as historical, cultural, aesthetic and spiritual values.


How is the management of rangelands done?

Management of rangelands occurs primarily through ecological processes, rather than agronomic applications. Grazing, by both domestic livestock and wildlife, is the most common ecological management process, with fire and weather extremes also being significant ecological factors.


How much land is considered rangeland?

Of the land within the United States borders, 36% is considered rangeland. The western side of the United States is 53% rangeland. Around 399 million acres (1,610,000 km²) of rangeland are privately owned. The Bureau of Land Management manages about 167 million acres (676,000 km²) of publicly owned rangeland, with the United States Forest Service managing approximately 95 million acres (380,000 km²) more. Ranchers may lease portions of this public rangeland and pay a fee based on the number and type of livestock and the period for which they are on the land.


What are rangelands?

Rangelands are grasslands, shrublands, woodlands, wetlands, and deserts that are grazed by domestic livestock or wild animals. Types of rangelands include tallgrass and shortgrass prairies, desert grasslands and shrublands, woodlands, savannas, chaparrals, steppes, and tundras. Rangelands do not include forests lacking grazable understory …


What is grazing in a rangeland?

Grazing is an important use of rangelands but the term rangeland is not synonymous with grazingland. Livestock grazing can be used to manage rangelands by harvesting forage to produce livestock, changing plant composition, or reducing fuel loads.


Why are rangelands in China shrinking?

Now the rangelands have shrunk due to population growth, economic, government, and social factors. Rangeland types in China include; Semi-desert, Dry Alpine Grasslands, Alpine Dwarf Shrub, Wetland types.


What is the difference between a rangeland and a pasture?

The primary difference between rangeland and pasture is management ; rangelands tend to have natural vegetation along with a few introduced plant species, but all managed by grazing, while pastures have forage that is adapted for livestock and managed, by seeding, mowing, fertilization and irrigation.


How are rangelands different from pastures?

Rangelands are distinguished from pasture lands because they grow primarily native vegetation, rather than plants established by humans. Rangelands are also managed principally with practices such as managed livestock grazing and prescribed fire rather than more intensive agricultural practices of seeding, irrigation, and the use of fertilizers.


What is rangeland in Canada?

Rangeland is a prominent feature of rural Canada. A provincial jurisdiction, administration and policy regarding range use varies across the country. As in many other Commonwealth countries, public tenures on crown land for the purpose of range activities are common in geographically compatible areas. Reconciling the economic needs of ranchers and the need for environmental conservation is one of the primary themes in modern range discourse.


What are the vegetations of a range?

The vegetation of ranges may include tallgrass prairies, steppes (shortgrass prairies), desert shrublands, shrub woodlands, savannas, chaparrals, and tundras. Temperate and tropical forests that are used for grazing as well as timber production can also be considered rangeland.


How are rangelands different from pasturelands?

Rangelands are distinguished from pastureland by the presence on them of native vegetation, rather than of plants established by human societies, and by their management principally through the control of the number of animals grazing on them, as opposed to the more intensive agricultural practices of seeding, irrigation, and the use of fertilizers. The tallgrass prairies of the North American Great Plains, the Ukraine, and parts of Argentina and Hungary formerly made ideal rangelands but were too well-suited to cultivated crops to be left for grazing purposes. Rangelands are thus more generally confined to areas of marginal or submarginal agricultural land or to areas that are entirely unsuited to permanent cultivation.


What is range management?

Range management depends for its effectiveness on range science, which is a body of knowledge drawn from the botanical and zoological sciences as well as from ecology, climatology, pedology (soil science), hydrology, and so on.


Does desertification occur in rangelands?

Desertification also occurs in rangelands. Typically, the damage in those environments can be separated into damage to soil and damage to vegetation. The former is more important than the latter; however, large areas experience both. The process of soil damage and loss often begins with the activities of grazing….


What are the primary economic outputs of a range lands?

Primary economic outputs include livestock production, but wildlife values are also a major economic consideration for these lands, especially range lands. Environmental values of these lands are extensive and provide many essential ecosystem services, such as clean water, wildlife and fish habitat, and recreation opportunities. …


How many states have range and pasture lands?

Range and pasture lands are located in all 50 states of the US. Privately owned range and pasture lands makes up over 27% (528 million acres) of the total acreage of the contiguous 48 states, and these lands constitute the largest private lands use category, exceeding both forest land (21%) and crop land (18%).


What is ecological site?

Ecological Sites comprise a land classification system that describes vegetation, ecological potential, and ecosystem dynamics of land areas. They are used to stratify the landscape and organize ecological information for the purpose of monitoring, assessment, and management. Ecological Sites are the basic unit of land classification …


What is pastureland?

Range and Pastureland Overview. Range and pasture lands are diverse types of land where the primary vegetation produced is herbaceous plants and shrubs. These lands provide forage for beef cattle, dairy cattle, sheep, goats, horses and other types of domestic livestock. Also many species of wildlife, ranging from big game such as elk …


What are grazing lands?

Other Grazing Lands. Most grazing lands are considered either range or pasture, but grazing lands also include grazed forest lands, grazed croplands, haylands, and native/naturalized pasture. These other land use types make up an additional 106 million acres of privately owned grazing lands, or about 17% of the total U. S. grazing lands.


What is NatGLC?

National Grazing Lands Coalition (NatGLC) The National Grazing Lands Coalition (NatGLC) is a nationwide partnership of organizations and individuals that was founded in 1991.


How are rangelands characterized?

Rangelands, as one of the most valuable national assets, are characterized by plant communities which contain complex functional interactions. A major objective of plant ecology is simplification of complex spatial interactions, especially in monitoring activities. In this respect, vegetation indicators have an important role for monitoring the desertification trend in these crucial communities. Furthermore, identifying the connection between plant patterns and their underlying ecological mechanisms, such as competition and facilitation, is essential to predict how climate and human changes alter plant community organization. In this study, the conceptual model was introduced to summarize vegetation transition shifts in various dynamics states in rangeland. Firstly, detailed field studies were carried out to investigate the pattern of Halocnemum strobilaceum ( Ha. St.) shrubs in Sufikam plain by using spatstat package in R software. Secondly, statistical results were introduced to the monitoring model for assessing vegetation transition shifts. The results of statistical analysis of spatial data in 2009 revealed that the Ha. St. shrubs had dispersed distribution up to scales of 17 m and these pattern was a significant departure from random labeling at the scales of 0–7 m. In 2017, the pattern of Ha. St. shrubs showed a greater tendency to clustered pattern at the scales of 0–18 m and after that they had a random pattern at the scales of 18–50 m. According to the new proposed model, the dispersed distribution in 2009 indicated a healthy state for Ha. St. shrubs, while a more aggregated pattern in 2017 reflected intraspecific competition for scarce resources. Thus, it was concluded that the model is useful for rangeland managers to get a correct understanding of eradication driving forces and destructive activities in these areas.


What are rangeland measurements?

Measurements that may be necessary in a rangeland area include sampling the vegetative cover of a particular plant species or the density per unit area, plant species diversity, total plant biomass, and perhaps a number of soil properties. These measures can also pertain to invasive species of concern and can be used to assess changes in rangeland resources over time. At specific locations, and in addition to the inventory and classification of rangeland conditions, the carrying capacity of rangeland vegetation may also be measured or estimated. By assessing the carrying capacity of a rangeland area, we inherently measure and estimate the productivity of rangeland plant communities. Rangeland measurements may also involve assessing the foraging and browsing activities of various animal species, which may also involve making a census of wildlife populations. At the broader, landscape scale, rangeland measurements can involve assessing the level of recreational use or of erosion occurring within a watershed.


Why are rangelands important?

Abstract. Rangelands provide an array of ecosystem services such as food, fiber, water, recreation, minerals, and are important to the livelihoods of people across the globe , especially in developing countries. Competing land uses, overgrazing, extreme climate events, and socioeconomic changes are resulting in rangeland degradation in many parts …


How do humans affect rangelands?

Rangelands provide many goods and services to humans, and humans have altered rangelands through their activities. Land potential describes the capacity for production of ecosystem services utilizing the inherent properties, resistance, and resilience of a location. The alteration of land potential by humans has led to changes in how these landscapes function and the ecosystem services they provide. Understanding current and future human needs along with the history of a landscape allows for land potential to act as a filter for management decisions. By combining inherent properties of a site with resistance and resilience along with knowledge about past management activities, land potential can help managers identify not only limitations but also opportunities for investment of resources that are both ecologically and economically positive on the landscape.


What is the role of rangelands in the ecosystem?

Rangelands play a primary role in plant protection, water reservation, and soil conservation if exploited correctly along with range restoration practices (Heshmati & Mohebbi, 2013).


What are the characteristics of a rangeland?

Droughty conditions and low biomass production restrict development of soil rich in organic matter and nutrients, characteristics that contribute to soil stability. Plant communities in rangelands flourish after rain, but ground cover is typically sparse before and during rainstorms. Under these conditions, the soil surface is exposed to raindrop impact, soil surface sealing, and overland flow. For example, rain in the Sonora and Mojave Deserts, and much of the Great Basin of North America, arrives as convectional storms from monsoonal weather patterns, bringing short-duration, high-intensity and -energy rainfall that dislodges and washes large amounts of soil into dry channels but quite often over relatively short distances in these channels. In regions where precipitation is in the winter and as snowfall, the risk of erosion is less than at lower elevation and latitudes, unless snowmelt is rapid and accompanied by rainfall.


What are the resources of rangelands?

They provide a wide variety of ecosystem goods and services requested by humans. This includes livestock forage, wildlife habitat, water , mineral resources, wood products, wildland recreation, open space and natural beauty. The geographic extent and the resources of rangelands make their sustainable use and management very important. Range management focuses therefore on grazing by livestock and related ecosystem goods and services. Many rangelands have been altered by persistent vegetation change, invasive species and soil degradation. Additionally, rangelands are facing social and environmental changes, for example, climate change. Future range management has to address these challenges.


What are rangelands?

Rangelands are vast natural landscapes in the form of grasslands, shrublands, woodlands, and deserts. Rangelands are the ” Wild Open Spaces ” that cover about half of the earth’s land surface and half of western North America.


What are rangelands called?

Rangelands are called by many different names around the world. These diverse and complex landscapes are recognized as several distinctive biomes including Grasslands , Shrublands , Woodlands, and Deserts.


What are the benefits of rangelands?

Rangelands produce a wide variety of goods and services desired by society, including livestock forage, wildlife habitat, water, mineral resources, wood products, wildland recreation, open space and natural beauty. The geographic extent and many important resources of rangelands make their proper use and management vitally important to people everywhere.


Who is involved in managing a lands?

People involved in managing these lands include range managers, plant ecologists, wildlife and livestock managers, soil scientists, and recreation specialists.


How much land is agricultural?

Under the FAO ‘s definitions above, agricultural land covers 38.4% of the world’s land area as of 2011. Permanent pastures are 68.4% of all agricultural land (26.3% of global land area), arable land (row crops) is 28.4% of all agricultural land (10.9% of global land area), and permanent crops (e.g. vineyards and orchards) are 3.1% (1.2% of global land area).


What is agricultural land?

Agricultural land is typically land devoted to agriculture, the systematic and controlled use of other forms of life —particularly the rearing of livestock and production of crops —to produce food for humans. It is generally synonymous with both farmland or cropland, as well as pasture or rangeland . The United Nations Food and Agriculture …


What is cropland in agriculture?

The land actually under annually-replanted crops in any given year is instead said to constitute ” sown land ” or ” cropped land “. “Permanent cropland” includes forested plantations used to harvest coffee, rubber, or fruit but not tree farms or proper forests used for wood or timber. Land able to be used for farming is called “cultivable land”.


What is the land used for farming called?

Land able to be used for farming is called “cultivable land “. Farmland, meanwhile, is used variously in reference to all agricultural land, to all cultivable land, or just to the newly restricted sense of “arable land”. Depending upon its use of artificial irrigation, the FAO’s “agricultural land” may be divided into irrigated …


What is permanent pasture?

permanent pastures: natural or artificial grasslands and shrublands able to be used for grazing livestock. This sense of “agricultural land” thus includes a great deal of land not devoted to agricultural use. The land actually under annually-replanted crops in any given year is instead said to constitute ” sown land ” or ” cropped land “.


Why is agricultural land protected?

In some areas, agricultural land is protected so that it can be farmed without any threat of development. The Agricultural Land Reserve in British Columbia in Canada, for instance, requires approval from its Agricultural Land Commission before its lands can be removed or subdivided.


Does the decrease of permanent pasture account for gross conversion?

The decrease of permanent pasture, however, does not account for gross conversion (e.g. land extensively cleared for agriculture in some areas, while converted from agriculture to other uses elsewhere) and more detailed analyses have demonstrated this.

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Overview


Types of rangeland

The United States Environmental Protection Agency defines rangeland as “lands on which the native vegetation (climax or natural potential plant community) is predominantly grasses, grass-like plants, forbs, or shrubs suitable for grazing or browsing use.” The EPA classifies natural grassland and savannas as rangeland, and in some cases includes wetlands, deserts, tundra, and “certain forb and shrub communities.” The primary difference between rangeland and pasture is …


North America

Rangeland is a prominent feature of rural Canada. A provincial jurisdiction, administration and policy regarding range use varies across the country. As in many other Commonwealth countries, public tenures on crown land for the purpose of range activities are common in geographically compatible areas. Reconciling the economic needs of ranchers and the need for environmental c…


Elsewhere

The different types of rangeland together form about 70% (excluding Antarctica) of the Earth’s surface.
Australia’s rangelands extend from tropical savannas in the north dominated by summer rainfall, though large areas of desert in central Australia to the southern rangelands dominated by winter rainfall. They cover approximately 80 per cen…


Uses of rangeland

Rangelands produce a wide variety of goods and services desired by society, including livestock forage (Grazing), wildlife habitat, water, mineral resources, wood products, wildland recreation, open space and natural beauty. The geographic extent and many important resources of rangelands make their proper use and management vitally important to people everywhere.


See also

• Applied ecology
• Coastal plain
• Coastal prairie
• Experimental range
• Field


External links

• Rangelands 1979-2003 archive – freely available volumes published by The Society For Range Management
• Society for Range Management
• Bureau of Land Management
• USDA Forest Service

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