what is the agriculture in egypt

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Agriculture of Egypt

  • A millennial agriculture. All the more beautiful as the seasonal flooding of the Nile had allowed since the fourth millennium BC to irrigate the cultivable land of its valley.
  • A dependence on the Nile. …
  • Habitat. …
  • Towards commercial agriculture. …

Field crops contribute some three-fourths of the total value of Egypt’s agricultural production, while the rest comes from livestock products, fruits and vegetables, and other specialty crops. Egypt has two seasons of cultivation, one for winter and another for summer crops.

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Answer

What are some agricultural products in Egypt?

 · Agriculture was the main driving factor for the establishment of the Egyptian civilization. Archeologists dated the beginning of agriculture in Egypt back to prehistoric period of 6,000-3,150 BCE…

Does Egypt have agriculture?

 · Egypt’s agriculture sector is dominated by small farms using traditional practices that do not meet international standards. USAID’s programs complement each other by enhancing the productivity of the entire agriculture value chain, from farm to table. Working with local associations and cooperatives, USAID helps Egyptian small-scale farmers be more …

When did agriculture start in Egypt?

Agriculture remains an important sector of the Egyptian economy. It contributes nearly one-eighth of the GDP, employs roughly one-fourth of the labour force, and provides the country—through agricultural exports—with an important part of its foreign exchange. The rapid increase in Egypt’s population prompted an intensification of cultivation almost without parallel …

What are the major agriculture exports from Egypt?

 · Egyptians relied on agriculture for more than just the production of food. They were creative in their use of plants, using them for medicine, as part of their religious practices, …

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What is the main agriculture in Egypt?

Rice is one of the major field crops, grown on nearly 500 000 feddans, and is considered the second most important export crop after cotton. Wheat is the major winter cereal grain crop and the third major crop in terms of area planted (about 600 000 feddans).

What does Egypt agriculture produce?

Egypt’s major agricultural exports to the world are potatoes, cotton, and fresh fruit, primarily citrus.

Does Egypt have good agriculture?

Egypt’s agricultural sector remains one of the most productive in the world, despite the small area of arable land and irregular and insufficient water supplies. Farmers do not have to pay for water used in irrigation.

What is the agriculture of ancient Egypt?

The staple crops of ancient Egypt were emmer (a wheat-grain), chickpeas and lentils, lettuce, onions, garlic, sesame, wheat, barley, papyrus, flax, the castor oil plant, and – during the period of the New Kingdom (c.

How much of Egypt is agriculture?

Agriculture is a major component of the Egyptian economy, contributing 11.3 percent of the country’s gross domestic product. The agricultural sector accounts for 28 percent of all jobs, and over 55 percent of employment in Upper Egypt is agriculture-related.

What are the types of agriculture?

Top 12 Types of AgricultureSubsistence Farming:Intensive Subsistence Farming (with or without Rice as a dominant crop):Mediterranean Farming:Commercial Grain Agriculture:Arable Farming:Shifting Cultivation:Nomadic Herding:Rudimentary Sedentary Tillage:More items…•

What crops did the Egyptian farmers grow?

A large variety of vegetables were grown, including onions, garlic, leeks, beans, lentils, peas, radishes, cabbage, cucumbers and lettuce. There were also fruits, such as dates, figs, pomegranates, melons and grapes, and honey was produced for sweetening desserts.

What is the main agricultural produce of the Nile valley?

Emmer wheat and barley were the most important crops and were grown to make bread and beer. Cereals were collected as taxes by officials on behalf of the pharaoh. Farmers also grew other crops such as lentils, broad beans, peas, watermelons and spices like coriander and cumin.

What did the Egyptians eat?

The ancient Egyptians loved garlic. They also ate green vegetables, lentils, figs, dates, onions, fish, birds, eggs, cheese, and butter. Their staple foods were bread and beer. Breads were sweetened with dates, honey, and figs or dates.

What did farmers live in ancient Egypt?

Farmers lived in houses made of mud bricks. Windows were built high up to give privacy and to help heat escape. Floors were made out of packed dirt. Farmers cooked food in small ovens fueled by burning dried cattle dung.

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What percentage of Egypt’s employment is agriculture?

The agricultural sector accounts for 28 percent of all jobs, and over 55 percent of employment in Upper Egypt is agriculture-related. Egypt’s agriculture sector is dominated by small farms using traditional practices that do not meet international standards.

What is feed the future in Egypt?

FEED THE FUTURE EGYPT RURAL AGRIBUSINESS STRENGTHENING: Through the Egypt Rural Agribusiness Strengthening activity, USAID helps farmers in Upper Egypt and the Delta become more self-reliant and grow marketable crops that meet international standards for export. Under the U.S. Government’s global hunger and food security initiative, Feed the Future, Egyptian farmers and food processors are establishing connections to domestic and international markets, gaining access to finance, and increasing their adherence to food and safety practices. Additionally, the activity assists Egyptian agribusinesses in modernizing their food technology and delivery systems by upgrading processing facilities, refrigeration trucks, and water-efficient irrigation systems. This activity builds on USAID’s previous investments in Egypt’s agricultural sector, including in irrigation infrastructure, establishment of agricultural associations, and training programs to help farmers transition from traditional staple crops to high-value horticulture. Implementing Partner: ABT Associates; Life of Activity: August 2018 – July 2023; Total Estimated Cost: $36.3 million; Governorates: Alexandria, Assiut, Aswan, Beheira, Beni Suef, Cairo, Dakahlia, Giza, Gharbia, Ismailia, Luxor, Menoufia, Minya, Qalyoubia, Qena, Sharkia, Sohag

How does USAID help Egyptian farmers?

Working with local associations and cooperatives, USAID helps Egyptian small-scale farmers be more responsive to global market needs. Through training, farmers are able to achieve international quality standards certification, which helps them gain exporters’ confidence in their products.

How many women are employed in agriculture?

Agriculture employs almost 45 percent of women in the workforce. Through work with agricultural technical schools, universities, and research institutions, USAID strengthens the quality of education and creates jobs and internships for students at commercial farms and factories.

How does USAID help Egypt?

USAID helps Egypt increase its agricultural productivity and raise farmers’ incomes to become more self-reliant. USAID has provided more than $1.4 billion to the agriculture sector in Egypt since 1978.

What is the agricultural sector in Egypt?

Farmland near Cairo, Egypt. Agriculture remains an important sector of the Egyptian economy. It contributes nearly one-eighth of the GDP, employs roughly one-fourth of the labour force, and provides the country—through agricultural exports—with an important part of its foreign exchange. The rapid increase in Egypt’s population prompted an …

What is the main crop of Egypt?

Unlike the situation in comparable developing countries, Egyptian agriculture is geared overwhelmingly toward commercial rather than subsistence production. Field crops contribute some three-fourths of the total value of Egypt’s agricultural production, while the rest comes from livestock products, fruits and vegetables, and other specialty crops. Egypt has two seasons of cultivation, one for winter and another for summer crops. The main summer field crop is cotton, which absorbs much of the available labour and represents a notable portion of the value of exports. Egypt is the world’s principal producer of long-staple cotton (1.125 inches [2.85 cm] and longer), normally supplying about one-third of the world crop; total Egyptian cotton production, however, constitutes just a tiny fraction of the global yield.

Why did the catches of sea fish in the waters off the Nile delta decline?

At the same time, catches of sea fish in the waters off the Nile delta have declined, because of the change in the flow and character of Nile water after the construction of the Aswān High Dam. Load Next Page.

What is the Egyptian government encouraging?

Following the construction of the Aswān High Dam, the Egyptian government encouraged the development of a fishing industry.

What are the three seasons of the Egyptian year?

The three seasons of the Egyptian year were even named after the land conditions produced by the river: akhet, the “inundation”; peret, the season when the land emerged from the flood; and shomu, the time when water was short.

What did the Egyptian government do to promote the development of deserts?

Conscious of the need to conserve and to increase arable land, the Egyptian government has encouraged the establishment of new settlements in desert areas and has promoted projects to bring large areas of unproductive desert under cultivation.

What are the most important resources in Egypt?

There are no forests or any permanent vegetation of economic significance apart from the land under cultivation. Water buffalo, cattle, asses, goats, and sheep are the most important livestock.

What was the ancient Egyptian agriculture?

Ancient Egyptian agriculture. Ploughing with a yoke of horned cattle in ancient Egypt. Painting from the burial chamber of Sennedjem, c. 1200 BC. The civilization of ancient Egypt was indebted to the Nile River and its dependable seasonal flooding.

What was the Egyptian crop used for?

Flax was another important industrial crop that had several uses. Its primary use was in the production of rope, and for linen which was the Egyptians’ principal material for making their clothing. Henna was grown for the production of dye. Scene showing the presentation of Egyptian cattle to Nebamun.

How did the Egyptians use the Nile River?

To make the best use of the waters of the Nile river, the Egyptians developed systems of irrigation. Irrigation allowed the Egyptians to use the Nile’s waters for a variety of purposes. Notably, irrigation granted them greater control over their agricultural practices. Floodwaters were diverted away from certain areas, such as cities and gardens, to keep them from flooding. Irrigation was also used to provide drinking water to Egyptians. Despite the fact that irrigation was crucial to their agricultural success, there were no statewide regulations on water control. Rather, irrigation was the responsibility of local farmers. However, the earliest and most famous reference to irrigation in Egyptian archaeology has been found on the mace head of the Scorpion King, which has been roughly dated to about 3100 BC. The mace head depicts the king cutting into a ditch that is part of a grid of basin irrigation. The association of the high ranking king with irrigation highlights the importance of irrigation and agriculture to their society.

Why was the Nile River important to ancient Egypt?

The civilization of ancient Egypt was indebted to the Nile River and its dependable seasonal flooding. The river’s predictability and fertile soil allowed the Egyptians to build an empire on the basis of great agricultural wealth. Egyptians are credited as being one of the first groups of people to practice agriculture on a large scale.

What did the Egyptians eat?

The Egyptians grew a variety of crops for consumption, including grains, vegetables and fruits. However, their diets revolved around several staple crops, especially cereals and barley. Other major grains grown included einkorn wheat and emmer wheat, grown to make bread.

What were the fruits of the Egyptian civilization?

Fruits were a common motif of Egyptian artwork , suggesting that their growth was also a major focus of agricultural efforts as the civilization’s agricultural technology developed. Unlike cereals and pulses, fruit required more demanding and complex agricultural techniques, including the use of irrigation systems, cloning, propagation and training. While the first fruits cultivated by the Egyptians were likely indigenous, such as the palm date and sorghum, more fruits were introduced as other cultural influences were introduced. Grapes and watermelon were found throughout predynastic Egyptian sites, as were the sycamore fig, dom palm and Christ’s thorn. The carob, olive, apple and pomegranate were introduced to Egyptians during the New Kingdom. Later, during the Greco-Roman period peaches and pears were also introduced.

What were the first fruits of the Egyptians?

While the first fruits cultivated by the Egyptians were likely indigenous, such as the palm date and sorghum, more fruits were introduced as other cultural influences were introduced. Grapes and watermelon were found throughout predynastic Egyptian sites, as were the sycamore fig, dom palm and Christ’s thorn.

What are the natural resources of Egypt?

Egypt’s natural resources are diverse: petroleum, natural gas, iron ore, phosphates, manganese, limestone, gypsum, talc, asbestos, lead, rare earth elements, zinc, etc.; but the country is disadvantaged by the fact that its territory is more than 90% arid desert, with as few as 3.6% of the land usable for agriculture [3], which can be considered by other nations as not enough to have a proper agriculture, and yet Egypt has fought to get the most out of its land.

What was the main crop in Egypt in 2003?

Agriculture consumed in 2003 81.1% of the total water supply potential [4]. The key agricultural sectors. The major crops cultivated in Egypt are: Rice: it is one the major cereal cultivated in the country. It is the second most exported crop after cotton.

What are the main crops grown in the Nile Valley?

Forage crops: Egyptian clover is the main produced forage crop in the Nile valley. The other major crops cultivated in Egypt are fruits, vegetables, and beans 5. Livestock production is an essential element of Egypt’s agricultural sector.

What was the GDP of Egypt in 2014?

The country’s nominal GDP was in 2014 estimated at 286.4 billion USD, which makes it the third largest African economy after Nigeria and South Africa. The GDP using purchasing power parity was calculated at 943.1 billion USD the same year. In 2014, the GDP’s growth rate of the country was 2.2%. The country’s ranking in World Bank’s doing business was 112th in 2015, a 1 point improvement compared to the previous year. Egypt’s GNI per capita is $3,160 [2].

What continent is Egypt in?

The country. Egypt is a country in North-Eastern Africa. It shares borders with Libya, Sudan, Israel and the Gaza Strip. It has coasts on the Mediterranean Sea and the Red Sea. The total area is 1,000,450 sq. km with a population of 83.39 million [1].

How many tons of corn were produced in 2014?

Corn: With nearly 6 million metric tons produced in 2014 and a 2.76% growth compared to 2013, it is one of the major crops cultivated in the country. The country is the eighth largest consumer in the world and the fifth largest importer [6] and the third producer in Africa after Nigeria and South Africa.

What is the importance of agriculture?

Agriculture is crucial to the economy ; its value added accounts for 14.5% of the country’s GDP. The sector also employs 29.6% of the total active population (2010) and represents 11% of all exports (2001) 2.

What percentage of the labor force was in agriculture in 2000?

In 1998, according to the CIA World Factbook for 2000, 40 percent of the labor force was employed in the agriculture sector. Cotton has been the country’s largest agricultural export product for many years.

Is Egypt’s agriculture productive?

Egypt’s agricultural sector remains one of the most productive in the world, despite the small area of arable land and irregular and insufficient water supplies. Farmers do not have to pay for water used in irrigation.

Is Egypt a large importer of food?

Today, 95 percent of the wheat and rice crops are used to satisfy domestic consumption but, despite increased output, Egypt continues to be a large importer of food, especially agricultural products. Imports of wheat rose by 8 percent in 1996-97 and have generally accounted for more than a quarter of total imports.

How much of Egypt’s land is agricultural?

Nearly all of Egypt’s agricultural production takes place in some 2.5 million hectares (6 million acres) of fertile soil in the Nile Valley and Delta. Some desert lands are being developed for agriculture, including the ambitious Toshka project in Upper Egypt, but some other fertile lands in the Nile Valley and Delta are being lost to urbanization and erosion.

What are the main crops in the desert?

Further improvement is possible, but land is worked intensively and yields are high. Cotton, rice, wheat, corn, sugarcane, sugar beets, onions, and beans are the principal crops. Increasingly, a few modern operations are producing fruits, vegetables and flowers, in addition to cotton, for export. While the desert hosts some large, modern farms, more common traditional farms occupy one acre each, typically in a canal-irrigated area along the banks of the Nile. Many small farmers also have cows, water buffaloes, and chicken, although larger modern farms are becoming more important.

Does the US sell wheat to Egypt?

The United States is a major supplier of wheat, corn, and soybean products to Egypt, almost all through commercial sales. Egypt is, in fact, traditionally the U.S.’s largest market for wheat sales. U.S. agricultural sales to Egypt average $1 billion annually. U.S. food assistance programs to Egypt ended in 1992 as Egypt became more prosperous. Egypt continues to receive modest food assistance through the World Food Program and from France.

Overview

Religion and agriculture

In ancient Egypt, religion was a highly important aspect of daily life. Many of the Egyptians’ religious observances were centered on their observations of the environment, the Nile and agriculture. They used religion as a way to explain natural phenomena, such as the cyclical flooding of the Nile and agricultural yields.
Although the Nile was directly responsible for either good or bad fortune experienced by the Egy…

Beginnings of agriculture

Faiyum Oasis provides the evidence for the earliest agriculture in Egypt. Domesticated sheep, goat, pig, and cattle are attested very early. Sheep at the site of Qasr El-Sagha is dated at 5350 BC (7350 cal BP), and sheep, goat and cattle at 5150 BC (7150 cal BP).
As to the crops, emmer wheat and barleyare found in the Faiyum, at the sites of Kom K and Kom W, dated ca. 4500-4200 BC. Plentiful pottery is found at these sites, but there’s little evidence of per…

Farming systems

The civilization of ancient Egypt developed in the arid climate of northern Africa. This region is distinguished by the Arabian and Libyan deserts, and the River Nile. The Nile is the longest river in the world, flowing northward from Lake Victoria and eventually emptying into the Mediterranean Sea. The Nile has two main tributaries: the Blue Nile which originates in Ethiopia, and the White Nilethat flows from Uganda. While the White Nile is considered to be longer and easier to traverse, t…

Crops grown

The Egyptians grew a variety of crops for consumption, including grains, vegetables and fruits. However, their diets revolved around several staple crops, especially cereals and barley. Other major grains grown included einkorn wheat and emmer wheat, grown to make bread. Other staples for the majority of the population included beans, lentils, and later chickpeas and fava beans. Root crops, such as onions, garlic and radishes were grown, along with salad crops, such as lettuce and p…

Livestock

Ancient Egyptian cattle were of four principal different types: long-horned, short-horned, polled and zebuine. The earliest evidence for cattle in Egypt is from the Faiyum region, dating back to the fifth millennium BC. In the New Kingdom, hump-backed zebuine cattle from Syria were introduced to Egypt, and seem to have replaced earlier types.
Manmade incubators, called Egyptian egg ovens, date back to the 4th century BCand were used t…

See also

• Land reform in ancient Egypt
• Badari culture

Bibliography

• Jared Diamond, Guns, germs and steel. A short history of everybody for the last 13,000 years, 1997.

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