what is the study of agriculture

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The major branches of agriculture are

  • Agronomy. Agronomy is the science that uses several applications of biology, economics, chemistry, ecology, water science, soil science, pest management, genetics, etc. …
  • Horticulture. Horticulture is the science that also includes the art of growing plants (vegetables, fruits, flowers).
  • Agricultural Engineering. …
  • Animal Science. …
  • Agricultural economics. …

agricultural sciences, sciences dealing with food and fibre production and processing. They include the technologies of soil cultivation, crop cultivation and harvesting, animal production, and the processing of plant and animal products for human consumption and use.

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Answer

What are some studies related to agriculture?

What is the study of agriculture called? Agronomy is a branch of agricultural science that deals with the study of crops and the soils in which they grow. Agronomists work to develop methods that will improve the use of soil and increase the production of food and fiber crops.

Why should I study agriculture?

Agriculture is an interdisciplinary field of study, which the later work in agricultural science is mostly practically oriented and requires direct contact with animals and plants. Agricultural …

What subjects do you need to study agriculture?

Agriculture includes the study of plants, soil, animals, research labs, nutritionists and research. There are over 30 majors within the field of agriculture as well as a number of different career …

What is the study of Agriculture called?

 · The most valuable science to study prior to studying agriculture is biology, which is an important element of the subject in areas such as the breakdown of plant life and …

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What do you call the study of agriculture?

Agronomy is the science and technology of producing and using plants by agriculture for food, fuel, fiber, chemicals, recreation, or land conservation. Agronomy has come to include research of plant genetics, plant physiology, meteorology, and soil science.

What is the best course to study in agriculture?

Therefore, below is the list of Top Agricultural courses worth studying in schools.Agricultural Economics and Farm Management.Agricultural Extension and Rural Sociology.Nutrition and Dietetics.Forestry and Wood Technology.Plant pathology.Food Science and Business.Fisheries and Aquaculture Technology.More items…•

What does agricultural science study?

Agricultural Science is a broad program that exposes students to agriculture in terms of the sciences as well as the economic and social science disciplines that are integral to the industry. Some aspects that students are exposed to include agricultural production, soil and water conservation, research, and business.

Is it good to study agriculture?

Without agriculture, there will be no food and no future. The world depends on farmers cultivating crops used for food production. Thus, agriculture can totally eradicate poverty and needs vibrant and passionate youths to be part of the sector.

Is agriculture hard to study?

Agriculture is an easy as well as a lively course to study. The credit hours for the course vary with the universities. In each semester you will study up to a maximum of 12 subjects. For most of the subjects except some of the allied subjects, there will be both practical and theory classes.

What are the 4 types of agriculture?

There exist four main branches of agriculture, namely;Livestock production.Crop production.agricultural economics.agricultural engineering.

Can I study agriculture without maths?

No, Mathematics is not a compulsory subject for BSC in Agriculture. You can leave maths but make sure you are good in physics , chemistry and biology. To get a seat in BSC Agriculture , you should be science student, with PCB or PCM. But you should score minimum 50% or 60% ( depending on Institute) .

Is agriculture a good career?

Career in Agriculture is one of the largest industries and a good source of employment across the country. Agriculture also plays a vital role in Indian economy. At present, students from all over the country are selecting the agriculture field for their career prospective.

What should I do after 12th in agriculture?

Agriculture Courses After 12th ScienceBSc in Agriculture.BSc in Horticulture.BSc in Plant Pathology.BSc in Food Science.BSc in Dairy Science.BSc in Plant Science.BSc in Agricultural Biotechnology.BSc in Fisheries Science.More items…•

How many years do you study agriculture?

four yearThe Bachelor of Science (BSc) in Agriculture is a four year undergraduate degree programme with its first cohort enrolled in 2016. The programme fits under the hard-applied and life system category. Scientific knowledge in Agricultural production is a critical skill identified in the National Development Plan (NDP).

What are the subjects in agriculture?

The major BSc Agriculture subjects are Plant Genetics, Agricultural Meteorology, Food Technology, Horticulture, Agronomy, Animal Husbandry, Entomology, Extension of Agriculture, Genetics, Soil Science, Agricultural Economics, Plant Breeding, Plant Pathology, Agriculture Engineering, Sericulture, to name a few.

What is the highest paying jobs in agriculture?

What are some of the highest paying jobs in agriculture?Water resources engineer.Farm manager.Water treatment specialist.Grower.Forester.Agricultural equipment technician.Food technologist.Environmental scientist.More items…•

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How does livestock affect the environment?

A senior UN official, Henning Steinfeld, said that “Livestock are one of the most significant contributors to today’s most serious environmental problems”. Livestock production occupies 70% of all land used for agriculture, or 30% of the land surface of the planet. It is one of the largest sources of greenhouse gases, responsible for 18% of the world’s greenhouse gas emissions as measured in CO 2 equivalents. By comparison, all transportation emits 13.5% of the CO 2. It produces 65% of human-related nitrous oxide (which has 296 times the global warming potential of CO 2) and 37% of all human-induced methane (which is 23 times as warming as CO 2 .) It also generates 64% of the ammonia emission. Livestock expansion is cited as a key factor driving deforestation; in the Amazon basin 70% of previously forested area is now occupied by pastures and the remainder used for feedcrops. Through deforestation and land degradation, livestock is also driving reductions in biodiversity. Furthermore, the UNEP states that ” methane emissions from global livestock are projected to increase by 60 per cent by 2030 under current practices and consumption patterns.”

What is the basis of pastoral agriculture for several Arctic and Subarctic peoples?

Reindeer herds form the basis of pastoral agriculture for several Arctic and Subarctic peoples.

How does agriculture increase yield?

Agriculture seeks to increase yield and to reduce costs. Yield increases with inputs such as fertilisers and removal of pathogens , predators, and competitors (such as weeds). Costs decrease with increasing scale of farm units, such as making fields larger; this means removing hedges, ditches and other areas of habitat.

What was the Arab agricultural revolution?

The Arab Agricultural Revolution, starting in Al-Andalus (Islamic Spain), transformed agriculture with improved techniques and the diffusion of crop plants.

How many people were employed in agriculture in the 21st century?

At the start of the 21st century, some one billion people, or over 1/3 of the available work force, were employed in agriculture. It constitutes approximately 70% of the global employment of children, and in many countries employs the largest percentage of women of any industry.

What did Sumerians do in ancient times?

In Eurasia, the Sumerians started to live in villages from about 8,000 BC, relying on the Tigris and Euphrates rivers and a canal system for irrigation. Ploughs appear in pictographs around 3,000 BC; seed-ploughs around 2,300 BC. Farmers grew wheat, barley, vegetables such as lentils and onions, and fruits including dates, grapes, and figs. Ancient Egyptian agriculture relied on the Nile River and its seasonal flooding. Farming started in the predynastic period at the end of the Paleolithic, after 10,000 BC. Staple food crops were grains such as wheat and barley, alongside industrial crops such as flax and papyrus. In India, wheat, barley and jujube were domesticated by 9,000 BC, soon followed by sheep and goats. Cattle, sheep and goats were domesticated in Mehrgarh culture by 8,000–6,000 BC. Cotton was cultivated by the 5th–4th millennium BC. Archeological evidence indicates an animal-drawn plough from 2,500 BC in the Indus Valley Civilisation. In China, from the 5th century BC there was a nationwide granary system and widespread silk farming. Water-powered grain mills were in use by the 1st century BC, followed by irrigation. By the late 2nd century, heavy ploughs had been developed with iron ploughshares and mouldboards. These spread westwards across Eurasia. Asian rice was domesticated 8,200–13,500 years ago – depending on the molecular clock estimate that is used – on the Pearl River in southern China with a single genetic origin from the wild rice Oryza rufipogon. In Greece and Rome, the major cereals were wheat, emmer, and barley, alongside vegetables including peas, beans, and olives. Sheep and goats were kept mainly for dairy products.

How did agriculture affect the world?

Since 1900 agriculture in developed nations, and to a lesser extent in the developing world, has seen large rises in productivity as mechanization replaces human labor, and assisted by synthetic fertilizers, pesticides, and selective breeding. The Haber-Bosch method allowed the synthesis of ammonium nitrate fertilizer on an industrial scale, greatly increasing crop yields and sustaining a further increase in global population. Modern agriculture has raised or encountered ecological, political, and economic issues including water pollution, biofuels, genetically modified organisms, tariffs and farm subsidies, leading to alternative approaches such as the organic movement.

What were the crops of Mesoamerica?

In Mesoamerica and South America, with the Inca, the Maya, Olmecs and the Aztecs, relatively early development of agriculture permitted the building of enormous cities that impressed the European colonizers; it was quickly identified that these civilizations had an impressive agriculture-based economy that stood on a par with Europe, challenging what was then understood about the development of civilization. In Mesoamerica it was corn and in South America it was the humble potato (18) – today the staple crop of most people in the western world, along with coca and the domestication of animal species such as llama and alpaca.

What is hunter-gatherer?

For most of our existence, humans were hunter-gatherers. This means that people lived a nomadic lifestyle, moving with the seasons to follow the food supply. As the glaciers retreated and plant life patterns and growth areas changed in response, it meant that the need to move so often became slightly less essential – though undoubtedly the lifestyle carried on for thousands of years as people sought to maximize their resource acquisition (4, p574-5). Hunter-gatherer societies would have known which crops were best to exploit with each season.

What was the Middle East’s agricultural revolution?

The Middle East continued to see much innovation in the agricultural industries, something that historians refer to as The Arab Agricultural Revolution (10). This was thanks to the diversity of the local topographies, the crops grown in the Middle East and Indus Valley that European societies coveted, and later acted as a trade bridge between Far East and Europe (11).

What is the early civilization?

Early Civilization. Early civilization can be considered a boom time in agricultural science and technology. Around 5500 BC (7, p26-28), the Sumerian civilization of the Middle East and other early pre Greco-Roman civilizations understood the need for a specialized agricultural workforce for their societies to thrive.

How did farming start?

The three field crop rotation system was replaced with a four field system and sweeping enclosure acts regulated land management, selective cross-breeding began on an industrial scale to increase crop size as well as yields creating several cultivars in the process. Animal husbandry also improved, leading to a greater surplus than had been permissible under the old system. It is said that these changes permitted the industrial revolution and even greater concentration of urban development, fueling the empire. How so? More crops for fewer workers, better methods of keeping and replacing nutrients in the soil meant that more people could work in industry. When the Corn Laws in England were repealed, it began the global food economy; about the same time, Charles Darwin’s Theory of Evolution put agriculture on the modern path of a science as we began to understand the development of crops.

What degree do you need to do research?

For research degrees, for example those related to the environment, genetics and selective breeding, agricultural engineering and technology, an advanced degree is a likely requirement – typically an MS if you want to focus on lab work rather than field work.

What is agriculture in the US?

Agriculture is defined as the cultivation and exploitation of animals, plants (including fungi) and other forms of organic life for human use including food, fiber, medicines, fuel and anything else. It is, and has been since there was an agricultural market, one of the largest employers of people; in the USA today, agriculture represents 20% of the US economy (1). Before organised agriculture, it is believed that the food supply could provide for just 4 million people globally (21).

What is an interdisciplinary perspective in agriculture?

Interdisciplinary perspectives: A degree programme in Agriculture offers the opportunity to approach agriculture at different levels. Thus, knowledge about the management and organisation as well as about the cultivation of plants can be gained.

Why do people study agriculture?

Three reasons to study Agriculture: 1 Interdisciplinary perspectives: A degree programme in Agriculture offers the opportunity to approach agriculture at different levels. Thus, knowledge about the management and organisation as well as about the cultivation of plants can be gained. 2 Good job opportunities: Worldwide, about 40% of people work in agriculture. However, this figure is not transferable to every nation, yet there are many opportunities and good job prospects for graduates with a degree in Agriculture. 3 Regional & international job opportunities: With a degree in Agriculture, you have a wide range of locations in which to pursue your job. There are opportunities to gain a foothold regionally as well as internationally.

How many majors are there in agriculture?

Agriculture includes the study of plants, soil, animals, research labs, nutritionists and research. There are over 30 majors within the field of agriculture as well as a number of different career opportunities.

What classes do you need to take to become a college student?

Some college courses will require you to enroll in the following classes once you’ve declared your major, so it’s important to be prepared: Agriculture and Environmental Ethics. Biology. Chemistry. Accounting. Nutrition. Soil Science. Livestock Management.

What are the classes required for high school?

Recommended high school (secondary school) classes include three lab sciences (including biology and chemistry, advanced biology is recommended if available), two to three years of a foreign language, four years of language arts and four years of math (including precalculus and calculus).

What are preferred colleges?

Preferred colleges are those that are considered land-grant universities. Land-grant universities are state schools that combine research, teaching and outreach — in many cases these big state schools dominate agricultural education. International students who want to study agriculture in the US will find that there are many colleges …

What is the purpose of studying agriculture?

Agriculture is a very broad field that seeks to help solve the world’s problems in relation to hunger, health issues, and improving the quality of living,

Why is the US important?

The US is a world leader in agricultural science and serves as an important role model for countries around the world seeking to address global food challenges. The United States utilizes some of the most advanced agricultural technology in the world, and students who study here have the opportunity to work with and learn from this technology.

What do you want to do after graduation?

It’s important to think about what you want to do after graduation so that you can design a curriculum that will provide you with the skills that will allow you to be competitive in your career. Farmers require a different skill set compared to horticulturalist. Hours and working conditions also vary by occupation.

What is agriculture in advertising?

ADVERTISEMENT. Agriculture is a mix of academia and practical work, and for that reason those who have spent time working on or merely being present at a farm, can produce a résumé that gives them an edge over other students.

What is the biotechnology sector?

The biotechnology sector is a wide umbrella, offering many different career paths for agriculture graduates. A consultancy role at a large firm is one such career option, with more scientific background allowing for involvement in the work such as genetically modified crops, or a more economic skill set being conducive to trade and business negotiations.

What can a graduate in agriculture do?

Perhaps most obviously a role for a graduate in agriculture could be as a manager on a conventional farm, or a specialised unit on a farm. With dedication these jobs can be both well paid and highly rewarding positions, overseeing crucial roles of food production in society and learning skills in overseeing a team that can be applied across sectors.

What is the theoretical study and practical application of farming?

Agriculture is both the theoretical study and practical application of farming, such as the cultivation of cereals.

What can I do with my multi billion dollar industry?

Expert knowledge of a multi-billion dollar industry can also lead to wider entrepreneurial opportunities, such as devising improvements in pre-existing products. Many trade publications focus on country living and the farming industry too, which can allow agriculture graduates with strong language and research skills to use their proficiency in a journalistic field.

What is an agricultural science degree?

A degree such as agricultural sciences will study the practice of farming both in microcosm and the wider picture, and in doing so will explore the ethical and environmental solutions to feeding a global population that continues to expand. Courses can include modules such as cropping and pasture sciences, and plant nutrition.

What is the most important science to study before studying agriculture?

The most valuable science to study prior to studying agriculture is biology, which is an important element of the subject in areas such as the breakdown of plant life and people’s dietary needs.

What is the most important element of agriculture?

A related specialization is agronomy, which has a more specific focus on crop production. Soil is, of course, one of the most essential elements in agriculture.

Why are geneticists important?

This role is crucial to the agricultural industry, due to constant challenges to meet market and consumer demands and maintain crop yields.

What are some topics covered in agriculture?

Some agriculture courses focus on preparing students for work at an international level – covering topics such as bio-based economies, sustainability on a global scale, and global food systems.

What does a farm manager do?

Farm managers usually work in animal, dairy or crop production, though you could potentially oversee the entire range of productions – this will depend on the nature and size of the farm. This is a varied role, which includes both farm-related tasks such as crop management and administrative tasks, so you’ll need to have technical and practical capability as well as strong business acumen and awareness of customer demand. You’ll also need to be committed to animal welfare and the environment.

What is an agriculture degree?

Typically offered as a Bachelor of Science (BSc Agriculture), agriculture courses are highly interdisciplinary, requiring students to have a good grasp of both natural sciences and social sciences, and drawing on areas such as biology , environmental sciences , chemistry , economics and business and management.

What is an agricultural consultant?

Agricultural consultants are specialist advisors who advise and support clients such as farmers, growers and landowners, to ensure their business is running as effectively as possible. You’ll typically specialize in offering either business or technical expertise. The former involves giving advice on finance and business strategy, while technical consultants help with agronomy, livestock, nutrition and other practical issues. For this agriculture career path, it would be useful to study business management as part of your degree.

What is soil in agriculture?

Soil is, of course, one of the most essential elements in agriculture. As a specialist in the subject, you’ll learn to analyze the biological, chemical and physical properties of soils, and apply this knowledge to issues such as increasing crop production, protecting human health, and ensuring environmental sustainability.

What are the components of agriculture?

Agricultural education is delivered through three interconnected components: 1 Classroom or laboratory instruction. 2 Experiential learning — Learning experiences that usually take place outside of the classroom, supervised by the agriculture instructor. 3 Leadership education — delivered through student organizations such as the National FFA Organization, the National Young Farmer Education Association, National Postsecondary Agricultural Student Organization and others.

What is experiential learning?

Experiential learning — Learning experiences that usually take place outside of the classroom, supervised by the agriculture instructor. Leadership education — delivered through student organizations such as the National FFA Organization, the National Young Farmer Education Association, National Postsecondary Agricultural Student Organization …

Why do high school students use FFA?

Many high school agriculture programs use FFA to enhance the leadership and experiential learning portions of their program. To learn more about FFA and its influence on agricultural education, visit www.ffa.org.

What is the three circle model of agriculture?

Agricultural Education uses a three-circle model of instruction. These are classroom and laboratory instruction, leadership development, and experiential learning. The successful integration of each of these three components results in a strong program that produces well rounded individuals who are prepared to be leaders in agriculture, business, and industry.

When did agriculture become a public school?

Agricultural education first became a part of the public education system in 1917 when the U.S. Congress passed the Smith-Hughes Act. Today, over 800,000 students participate in formal agricultural education instructional programs offered in grades seven through adult throughout the 50 states and three U. S. territories.

Is there enough agriculture teachers?

Nationwide, there are not enough agriculture teachers to meet the demand . The National Teach Ag Campaign, an initiative of The National Council for Agricultural Education led by NAAE is an effort to combat that while celebrating current agricultural educators.

Why is agriculture important?

Here are ten reasons why agriculture is important: #1. It’s the main source of raw materials. Many raw materials, whether it’s cotton, sugar, wood, or palm oil, come from agriculture. These materials are essential to major industries in ways many people aren’t even aware of, such as the manufacturing of pharmaceuticals, diesel fuel, plastic, …

How does agriculture help the environment?

It can help heal the environment. Agriculture possesses the power to harm or heal. When farmers prioritize biodiversity on their land, it benefits the earth. Having more biodiversity results in healthier soil, less erosion, better water conservation, and healthier pollinators.

What happens to agriculture when it suffers?

Countries with plenty of those supplies export them and trade for materials they don’t have. If a country’s agriculture suffers for some reason, prices can go up and it disrupts the flow of trade.

How does agriculture help in developing countries?

In developing countries, agricultural jobs help reduce high rates of unemployment. When it comes to reducing poverty, evidence shows that focusing on agriculture is significantly more effective than investing in other areas. #5. It’s crucial to a country’s development.

Why is economic development important?

When trade, national revenue, and employment are combined in a positive way, a country enjoys reduced poverty and boosted economic growth.

Where does Emmaline Soken-Huberty live?

Emmaline Soken-Huberty is a freelance writer specializing in a variety of topics from healthy living to human rights and cookbooks. She lives in Oregon with her husband. When not working, she enjoys reading, baking, and exploring nature.

Do developing countries depend on agriculture?

Speaking of trade, developing countries still get most of their national income from agricultural exports. While developed countries don’t depend on agriculture as much as they used to, their economies would definitely take a hit if all exports suddenly stopped.

Overview

Environmental impact

Agriculture is both a cause of and sensitive to environmental degradation, such as biodiversity loss, desertification, soil degradation and global warming, which cause decrease in crop yield. Agriculture is one of the most important drivers of environmental pressures, particularly habitat change, climate change, water use and toxic emissions. Agriculture is the main source of toxins released into the …

Etymology and scope

The word agriculture is a late Middle English adaptation of Latin agricultūra, from ager ‘field’ and cultūra ‘cultivation’ or ‘growing’. While agriculture usually refers to human activities, certain species of ant, termite and beetlehave been cultivating crops for up to 60 million years. Agriculture is defined with varying scopes, in its broadest sense using natural resources to “produce commodities which maintain life, including food, fiber, forest products, horticultural crops, and t…

History

The development of agriculture enabled the human population to grow many times larger than could be sustained by hunting and gathering. Agriculture began independently in different parts of the globe, and included a diverse range of taxa, in at least 11 separate centers of origin. Wild grains were collected and eaten from at least 105,000 years ago. From around 23,000 years ago, the eight Neolithic …

Types

Pastoralism involves managing domesticated animals. In nomadic pastoralism, herds of livestock are moved from place to place in search of pasture, fodder, and water. This type of farming is practised in arid and semi-arid regions of Sahara, Central Asia and some parts of India.
In shifting cultivation, a small area of forest is cleared by cutting and burning th…

Contemporary agriculture

From the twentieth century, intensive agriculture increased productivity. It substituted synthetic fertilizers and pesticides for labour, but caused increased water pollution, and often involved farm subsidies. In recent years there has been a backlash against the environmental effects of conventional agriculture, resulting in the organic, regenerative, and sustainable agriculturemovements. O…

Production

Overall production varies by country as listed.
Cropping systems vary among farms depending on the available resources and constraints; geography and climate of the farm; government policy; economic, social and political pressures; and the philosophy and culture of the farmer.
Shifting cultivation (or slash and burn) is a system in which forests are burnt, r…

Crop alteration and biotechnology

Crop alteration has been practiced by humankind for thousands of years, since the beginning of civilization. Altering crops through breeding practices changes the genetic make-up of a plant to develop crops with more beneficial characteristics for humans, for example, larger fruits or seeds, drought-tolerance, or resistance to pests. Significant advances in plant breeding ensue…

Prehistory

Early Civilization

Early to Modern Civilization

The Americas

Modern Farming

  • Modern farming began around the 18thcentury in what is generally referred to as “The British Agricultural Revolution” when several advances and changes were made to farming in a short space of time that saw massive increases in yield and a more efficient process. The three field crop rotation system was replaced with a four field system and sweepin…

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The Ecological Age

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