What led to the agricultural revolution

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The first was caused by humans changing from being hunter-gatherers to farmers and herders. The second was caused by improvements to livestock breeding, farming equipment, and crop rotation. The third was caused by plant breeding and new techniques in irrigation, fertilization, and pesticides.Oct 21, 2021

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What effect did the Agricultural Revolution have on farmers?

The agricultural revolution helped farmers produce more food and if there is more food, then people will have more kids. Farmers discovered that, by using technology, they could increase the quality and quantity of the food they produce. Regarding this, what were the positive effects of the agricultural revolution? Increased quality of livestock.

What were the causes of the Agricultural Revolution?

What events happened during the agricultural revolution?

  • Jan 1, 1700. Weather Gets Better.
  • Period: Jan 1, 1700 to Jan 1, 1895. Years.
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  • May 29, 1701. Jethro Tull invents the seed drill.
  • May 29, 1730. The Rotherham Plow.
  • May 30, 1755. Selective Breeding Introduced.
  • May 30, 1773. The Enclosure Act.
  • May 30, 1782. Seed Drill Improved.

What led people to begin farming?

  • high fertility of ground;
  • very hostile and unpleasant surrounding territory for wide stretches;
  • relatively stable climate.

What is the main idea of the Agricultural Revolution?

The increase in agricultural production and technological advancements during the Agricultural Revolution contributed to unprecedented population growth and new agricultural practices, triggering such phenomena as rural-to-urban migration, development of a coherent and loosely regulated agricultural market, and emergence of capitalist farmers.

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What was the agricultural revolution?

The Agricultural Revolution was a period of technological improvement and increased crop productivity that occurred during the 18th and early 19th centuries in Europe. In this lesson, learn the timeline, causes, effects and major inventions that spurred this shift in production. Create an account.


What were the factors that contributed to the agricultural revolution?

The increased agricultural production of the 18th century can be traced to four interrelated factors: The increased availability of farmland. A favorable climate.


How did crop rotation and livestock utilization affect society?

New patterns of crop rotation and livestock utilization paved the way for better crop yields, a greater diversity of wheat and vegetables and the ability to support more livestock . These changes impacted society as the population became better nourished and healthier.


How did the boost in livestock affect the diet of much of Europe?

Not only were Europeans consuming more meat, but the livestock was producing much needed fertilizer for crops. The addition of fertilizer allowed an improved production rate per acre.


What did Charles Townshend use to plant his own farm?

Tull also maintained that one should use a hoe to break up the soil and allow air and moisture in. Charles Townshend used the four-field system on his own land. Testing the system on his own farm, he planted wheat in the first field, clover in the second, oats in the third and turnips in the fourth.


Why were turnips important to farmers?

The cultivation of turnips was important because they could be left in the ground through the winter.


What crops were introduced to Europe in 1750?

During this time, new crops were becoming popular in Europe. For instance, potatoes and maize were brought from America and introduced to Europe. These crops were grown in large scale after 1750. In particular, the potato became a staple crop in places such as Ireland and Germany.


What were the main causes of the agricultural revolution?

The Agricultural Revolution that took place during the 18th century in Europe was caused by four primary factors, which were the increased availability of and access to farmland, a warm and stable climate for crop production, an increase in number of livestock and a more voluminous crop yield.


When did the agricultural revolution take place?

The Agricultural Revolution that swept through Europe during the 18th and 19th centuries came many years after the first Agricultural Revolution recorded by historians, which took place around 10,000 B.C.


Why did the second revolution occur?

While the first revolution introduced a societal change from nomadic lifestyles to stationary farms and villages, the second revolution occurred because of an influx of new technologies that improved farming techniques and made farming more efficient.


Why did the warmer temperatures help the growing season?

Warmer temperatures also brought longer growing seasons, which in turn allowed for production of more crops. Machines replaced human labor, minimizing costs for farmers and expediting production, and crops were grown on larger scales, then harvested and shipped for sale. ADVERTISEMENT.


What was the agricultural revolution? What were some examples?

For example, the Industrial Revolution began in Britain in the 18th century due in part to an increase in food production, which was the key outcome of the Agricultural Revolution. As such, the Agricultural Revolution is considered to have begun in the 17th century and continued throughout the centuries that followed, alongside the Industrial Revolution.


What were the main features of the agricultural revolution?

Jethro Tull. Another important feature of the Agricultural Revolution was the Enclosure Movement . In the decades and centuries before the 1700s, British farmers planted their crops on small strips of land while allowing their animals to graze on common fields shared collectively.


Why was the increase in population important to the beginning of the Industrial Revolution?

The increased population was important to the beginning of the Industrial Revolution because it created a large workforce for the factories and mines that would be common during the time. A key aspect of the Industrial Revolution was the invention of different types of machines, many of which were used in farming and agriculture. …


How did the increase in food production help the Industrial Revolution?

First, the increased population helped produce workers for the factories and mines that were so important to the Industrial Revolution.


Why did European farmers not plant the same crop every year?

This would cause them to have to not plant anything in the field every few years in order to avoid destroying the quality of the soil.


When did the Industrial Revolution begin?

For example, the Industrial Revolution began in Britain in the 18th century due in part to an increase in food production, which was the key outcome of the Agricultural Revolution. As such, the Agricultural Revolution is considered to have begun in the 17th century and continued throughout the centuries that followed, …


What invention did Tull use to drill seeds into the soil?

As a result, Tull invented a seed drill with a rotating cylinder to drill the seeds into the soil. This made the planting process much quicker.


What was the agricultural revolution?

The agricultural revolution is the name given to a number of cultural transformations that initially allowed humans to change from a hunting and gathering subsistence to one of agriculture and animal domestications. Today, more than 80% of human worldwide diet is produced from less than a dozen crop species many of which were domesticated many years ago. Scientists study ancient remains, bone artifacts, and DNA to explore the past and present impact of plant and animal domestication and to make sense of the motivations behind early cultivation techniques. Archeological evidence illustrates that starting in the Holocene epoch approximately 12 thousand years ago (kya), the domestication of plants and animals developed in separate global locations most likely triggered by climate change and local population increases. This transition from hunting and gathering to agriculture occurred very slowly as humans selected crops for cultivation, animals for domestication, then continued to select plants and animals for desirable traits. The development of agriculture marks a major turning point in human history and evolution. In several independent domestication centers, cultivation of plants and animals flourished according to the particular environmental conditions of the region, whereas human migration and trade propelled the global spread of agriculture. This change in subsistence provided surplus plant food that accumulated during the summer and fall for storage and winter consumption, as well as domesticated animals that could be used for meat and dairy products throughout the year. Because these new survival strategies no longer required relocation and migration in search of food, humans were able to establish homesteads, towns, and communities, which, in turn, caused rapid increases in population densities and lead to the emergence of civilizations. This dependence on plant and animal domestication entailed a number of other environmental adaptations including deforestation, irrigation, and the allocation of land for specific crop cultivation. It also triggered various other innovations including new tool technologies, commerce, architecture, an intensified division of labor, defined socioeconomic roles, property ownership, and tiered political systems. This shift in subsistence mode provided a relatively safer existence and in general more leisure time for analytical and creative pursuits resulting in complex language development, and the accelerated evolution of art, religion, and science. However, increases in population density also correlated with the increased prevalence of diseases, interpersonal conflicts, and extreme social stratification. The rise of agriculture and the influence of genetics and culture (gene–culture coevolution) continue to affect modern humans through alterations in nutrition, predisposition to obesity, and exposure to new diseases. This chapter will cover the various regions that adopted early agricultural practices and look at the long-term positive and negative effects of agriculture on society.


How did the agricultural revolution affect the human population?

The agricultural revolution in developing countries has produced large resident human populations with the potential for direct person-to-person spread of infection and greater environmental contamination by feces.


What was the transition from hunting and gathering to agriculture?

This transition from hunting and gathering to agriculture occurred very slowly as humans selected crops for cultivation, animals for domestication, then continued to select plants and animals for desirable traits. The development of agriculture marks a major turning point in human history and evolution.


How does agriculture affect humans?

The rise of agriculture and the influence of genetics and culture (gene–culture coevolution) continue to affect modern humans through alterations in nutrition, predisposition to obesity, and exposure to new diseases.


Why did humans establish homesteads?

Because these new survival strategies no longer required relocation and migration in search of food, humans were able to establish homesteads, towns, and communities, which, in turn, caused rapid increases in population densities and lead to the emergence of civilizations.


When did domestication begin?

Archeological evidence illustrates that starting in the Holocene epoch approximately 12 thousand years ago (kya), the domestication of plants and animals developed in separate global locations most likely triggered by climate change and local population increases.


When did the Industrial Revolution begin?

Swiftly on the back of the agricultural revolution came the industrial revolution. This was a period of rapid industrial growth beginning in England toward the second quarter/half of the 18th century (1725–50 AD), which then moved throughout the Europe and the United States.


What was the agricultural revolution?

All that changed in the 18th century with the agricultural revolution, a period of agricultural development that saw a massive and rapid increase in agricultural productivity and vast improvements in farm technology.


Who invented the seed planter?

Seed planters for corn came somewhat later, as machines to plant wheat successfully were unsuited for corn planting. In 1701, Jethro Tull invented his seed drill and is perhaps the best-known inventor of a mechanical planter.


What was the cotton gin? What was its effect on the South?

The cotton gin had turned the whole South toward the cultivation of cotton. While the South was not manufacturing any considerable proportion of the cotton it grew, the textile industry was flourishing in the North. A whole series of machines similar to those used in Great Britain had been invented in America and mills paid higher wages than in Britain. Production was also far ahead of the British mills in proportion to hands employed, which meant the U.S. was ahead of the rest of the world.


How did the railroad and steamboats help the West?

The steamboat and the railroad enabled transportation to the West. While steamboats traveled all the larger rivers and the lakes, the railroad was growing rapidly. Its lines had extended to more than 30 thousand miles. Construction also went on during the war, and the transcontinental railway was in sight.


What happened between the eighth century and the eighteenth century?

Updated August 11, 2019. Between the eighth century and the eighteenth, the tools of farming basically stayed the same and few advancements in technology were made. This meant that the farmers of George Washington’s day had no better tools than the farmers of Julius Caesar’s day.


When were drills invented?

American manufacture of these drills began about 1840. Seed planters for corn came somewhat later, as machines to plant wheat successfully were unsuited for corn planting. In 1701, Jethro Tull invented his seed drill and is perhaps the best-known inventor of a mechanical planter.


Did textile mills have free land?

Additionally, there was a good supply of free land or land that was practically free. Wages were high enough that many could save enough to buy their own land. Workers in textile mills often worked only a few years to save money, buy a farm or to enter some business or profession.


What was the agricultural revolution?

Mingay asserts that in this time period, the agricultural progress, was a technological revolution that raised the productivity of the land substantially. Many other writers illustrate the point by drawing on individuals and their inventions, even if some of their ideas were far from revolutionary or effective.


What crops were used in the Medieval rotation system?

The Medieval rotation system in which fields were left fallow between planting with grain crops had been used in English agriculture for centuries but the use of two new crops turnips and clover on which cattle could be fed had a double impact on soil fertility.


What is an enclosure in agriculture?

Enclosure was a way of making sure land was consolidated into a field system that could be more economically and efficiently farmed. These fields were then either held and farmed by individuals or rented out to other individuals or groups of people.


What was the Golden Age of Agriculture?

1850-1873 known as the ‘Golden age of British Agriculture’: it was a period of exceptional prosperity following the repeal of the Corn Laws in 1834.


Why did clover leave fields fallow?

Thus the need to leave fields fallow in order to allow nitrogen to be absorbed form the atmosphere back into the soil had gone. More livestock could be kept, soil fertility increased and much more food could be produced.


What was the threat to British farming caused by the repeal of the Corn laws?

This period has been termed, arguably, the Agricultural Depression.


How long did the agricultural depression last?

it would remain that way for most of the period up until the later part of the 1930’s, some 40 years.


How did the Green Revolution affect agriculture?

The spread of Green Revolution agriculture affected both agricultural biodiversity (or agrodiversity) and wild biodiversity. There is little disagreement that the Green Revolution acted to reduce agricultural biodiversity, as it relied on just a few high-yield varieties of each crop.


Who was the father of the Green Revolution?

One key leader was agricultural scientist Norman Borlaug, the “Father of the Green Revolution”, who received the Nobel Peace Prize in 1970.


What was the main goal of the Chinese government?

When the Chinese Communists came to power in 1949, the Chinese state came to play a major role in agricultural policy and scientific research. It sought to solve China’s food security issues, eliminating hunger and starvation, seeking to transform traditional cultivation of existing strains of rice and to apply new science and technology to agricultural production. Through agrarian reform over the 1950s, it eliminated absentee landlords and created collective farms, which could utilize mechanized cultivation. However, grain production did not increase significantly until the state began promoting state-supported agricultural research and investment in infrastructure. The development of strains of hybrid rice had long been a practice in Chinese agriculture, but in the 1960s, this ramped up through government supported agricultural science. Prominent in the development of productive hybrid rice was Yuan Longping, whose research hybridized wild strains of rice with existing strains. He has been dubbed “the father of hybrid rice,” and was considered a national hero in China. The Chinese government’s policies gave cultivators technical assistance, access to affordable HYVs, fertilizers, and pesticides, and developed infrastructure. Chinese rice production met the nation’s food security needs. In recent years, however, extensive use of ground water for irrigation has drawn down aquifers and extensive use of fertilizers has increased greenhouse gas emissions. China has not expanded the area of cultivable land, but the Green Revolution with high yields per hectare gave China the food security it sought.


What happened in the aftermath of the Mexican Revolution?

In the aftermath of the Mexican Revolution, the government had redistributed land to peasants in some parts of the country which had broken the back of the hacienda system. During the presidency of Lázaro Cárdenas (1934-1940), land reform in Mexico reached its apex in the center and south of Mexico.


What was Mexico called during the Green Revolution?

Mexico has been called the ‘birthplace’ and ‘burial ground’ of the Green Revolution. It began with great promise and it has been argued that “during the twentieth century two ‘revolutions’ transformed rural Mexico: the Mexican Revolution (1910–1920) and the Green Revolution (1950–1970).”.


What were the key elements of the Revolution?

The key elements of the revolution include: 1) Use of the latest technological and capital inputs, 2) adoption of modern scientific methods of farming, 3) use of high yielding varieties of seeds, 4) proper use of chemical fertilizers, 5) consolidation of land holdings.


What was the Blue Revolution?

The Blue Revolution, or the Third Agricultural Revolution, is the set of research technology transfer initiatives occurring between 1950 and the late 1960s, that increased agricultural production in parts of the world, beginning most markedly in the late 1960s. The initiatives resulted in the adoption of new technologies, …

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