What was the british agricultural revolution

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The Agricultural Revolution

  • New Agricultural Practices. The Agricultural Revolution, the unprecedented increase in agricultural production in Britain between the mid-17th and late 19th centuries, was linked to such new agricultural practices as crop …
  • New Agricultural Tools. …
  • The Enclosure Act. …
  • Effects of the Agricultural Revolution. …

The British Agricultural Revolution, or Second Agricultural Revolution, was an unprecedented increase in agricultural production in Britain arising from increases in labour and land productivity between the mid-17th and late 19th centuries.

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What was bad about the Agricultural Revolution?

When the Agricultural Revolution occurred, the combination of overcrowding of both humans and domesticated animals and switching to an unvaried cereal- and grain-based diet caused an assortment of health issues.

What were the result of the agricultural revolution in Britain?

​The results of Agrarian revolution In Britain

  • Improved farming methods, which led to increased food production.
  • Population increase as food was abundant. …
  • A large variety of crops e.g. …
  • New animal breeds such as the Friesian cow as well as Leicester and Suffolk sheep, among others.
  • large scale farming in place of subsistence farming.
  • Mechanization of farming as cultivation of large farms was adopted.

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What was the Agricultural Revolution and what causes it?

Causes of the Agricultural Revolution. What might be deemed the first agricultural revolution was when prehistoric man discovered how to cultivate his own food. This marked the move from a nomadic hunter-gatherer society to one of permanent settlements, villages, towns and eventually, cities. Another development that many historians consider to …

Which was common in England after the Agricultural Revolution?

agricultural revolution, gradual transformation of the traditional agricultural system that began in Britainin the 18th century. Aspects of this complex transformation, which was not completed until the 19th century, included the reallocation of land ownership to make farms more compact and an increased investment in technical improvements, such as new machinery, better drainage, scientific methods of breeding, and experimentation with new crops and systems of crop rotation.

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What was the Agricultural Revolution short answer?

The Agricultural Revolution of the 18th century paved the way for the Industrial Revolution in Britain. New farming techniques and improved livestock breeding led to amplified food production. This allowed a spike in population and increased health. The new farming techniques also led to an enclosure movement.


When was the Agricultural Revolution in Britain?

agricultural revolution, gradual transformation of the traditional agricultural system that began in Britain in the 18th century.


What happened during the Agricultural Revolution in Britain?

For many years the agricultural revolution in England was thought to have occurred because of three major changes: the selective breeding of livestock; the removal of common property rights to land; and new systems of cropping, involving turnips and clover.


What was the Agricultural Revolution and what caused it?

The first was caused by humans changing from being hunter-gatherers to farmers and herders. The second was caused by improvements to livestock breeding, farming equipment, and crop rotation. The third was caused by plant breeding and new techniques in irrigation, fertilization, and pesticides.


What were the effects of the Agricultural Revolution?

The agricultural revolution had a variety of consequences for humans. It has been linked to everything from societal inequality—a result of humans’ increased dependence on the land and fears of scarcity—to a decline in nutrition and a rise in infectious diseases contracted from domesticated animals.


Was the Agricultural Revolution good or bad?

It is estimated that total agricultural output grew 2.7-fold between 1700 and 1870 and output per worker at a similar rate. The Agricultural Revolution gave Britain the most productive agriculture in Europe, with 19th-century yields as much as 80% higher than the Continental average.


How did Agricultural Revolution contribute to the start of the Industrial Revolution?

How did the Agricultural Revolution lead to the Industrial Revolution? When farming methods improved, food supplies increased, and so did England’s population; this led to increased demand for goods. Small farmers lost their land to enclosed farms and became factory workers.


What were the positive and negative effects of the Agricultural Revolution?

– Positive: There are more people because there is enough food. More ideas can be created and the population can become more diverse. – Negative: More competition for space and resources.


What is the Agricultural Revolution quizlet?

Agricultural Revolution. A period mainly during the 18th century where farming methods were greatly improved and more products were able to be produced. Some of the new methods that were introduced included the use of fences, seed drills, and also, crop rotation.


How was the Agricultural Revolution?

The Neolithic Revolution, or the (First) Agricultural Revolution, was the wide-scale transition of many human cultures during the Neolithic period from a lifestyle of hunting and gathering to one of agriculture and settlement, making an increasingly large population possible.


What is the first agricultural revolution?

The First Agricultural Revolution is also called the Neolithic Revolution. This revolution began around 10,000 B.C. Humans made significant changes…


What are the 3 agricultural revolutions?

The First Agricultural Revolution, or the Neolithic Revolution, began around 10,000 B.C. Humans shifted from being hunter-gathers to being subsiste…


What is the agricultural revolution and why is it important?

An agricultural revolution is when farming techniques drastically improve within a relatively short period of time. This leads to a greater product…


What caused the Agricultural Revolution?

Each of the Agricultural Revolutions have different causes. The first was caused by humans changing from being hunter-gatherers to farmers and herd…


What are the characteristics of the agricultural revolution?

The characteristics of the agricultural revolution are the changes in how food is produced and the amount of food produced.


How did the Agricultural Revolution affect people’s lives?

The agricultural revolutions affected how people worked and got their food. The first caused people to grow crops and raise animals for food. The s…


What was the agricultural revolution?

Agricultural revolution, gradual transformation of the traditional agricultural system that began in Britain in the 18th century. Aspects of this complex transformation, which was not completed until the 19th century, included the reallocation of land ownership to make farms more compact and an increased investment in technical improvements, …


What is crop rotation?

crop rotation, the successive cultivation of different crops in a specified order on the same fields, in contrast to a one-crop system or to haphazard crop successions. Throughout human history, wherever food crops have been produced, some kind of rotation cropping appears to have been practiced. One system in central Africa…


What was cut for feed in the fourth year?

The clover and ryegrass were cut for feed or grazed in the fourth year. In the winter, cattle and sheep were fed the turnips. The development of Shorthorn beef cattle through selective breeding of local cattle of the Teeswater district, Durham county, typified the advances brought about by scientific breeding.


When did the agricultural revolution start?

Agricultural Revolution in England 1500 – 1850. From the 16th century onwards, an essentially organic agriculture was gradually replaced by a farming system that depended on energy-intensive inputs. Mark Overton assesses the impact of this agrarian revolution.


What were the major changes in the agricultural revolution?

For many years the agricultural revolution in England was thought to have occurred because of three major changes: the selective breeding of livestock; the removal of common property rights to land; and new systems of cropping, involving turnips and clover. All this was thought to have been due to a group of heroic individuals, who, according to one account, are ‘a band of men whose names are, or ought to be, household words with English farmers: Jethro Tull, Lord Townshend, Arthur Young, Bakewell, Coke of Holkham and the Collings.’


Why are turnips important?

The Worlidge Drill © The most important new crop in this context is the turnip, because it meant that the area of fallow land could be reduced. This was because one of the purposes of the fallow was to clear the land of weeds by ploughing, but a crop of turnips sown in rows could be hoed to remove weeds while it was growing. Thus fallow land was about 20 per cent of the arable area in England in 1700, and steadily declined to reach only 4 per cent in 1871. One of the earliest pieces of evidence we have, concerning the cultivation of turnips for animal fodder, is the inventory taken for probate purposes, in 1638, of the possessions of a Mr Pope, of Burgh Castle in Suffolk. But turnips were not common until the mid-18th century, and not widespread as part of the new Norfolk four-course rotation until the 19th century.


How did farmers conserve nitrogen?

Available nitrogen was conserved by feeding bullocks in stalls, collecting their manure (which is rich in nitrogen), and placing it where it was needed. Also, most importantly, new nitrogen was added to the soil using legumes – a class of plants that have bacteria attached to their roots, which convert atmospheric nitrogen into nitrates in the soil that can be used by whatever plants are grown there in the following few years.


What crops were replaced by pasture?

A sheaf-delivery reaper at work © The mix of crops also changed, replacing low-yielding types, such as rye, with higher-yielding types such as wheat or barley. The balance between arable and permanent pasture also changed, so that more productive arable land was replacing permanent pasture. This does not mean that fodder supplies were falling, quite the reverse, for the loss of permanent pasture was made good by new fodder crops, especially turnips and clover, in arable rotations. Not only did these crops result in an increase in fodder yields, but they were also instrumental in the reclamation of many lowland heaths from rough pasture to productive arable farms.


Why did the output of agriculture grow?

One reason output grew was through new farming systems involving the rotation of turnips and clover, although these were part of the general intensification of agricultural production, with more food being produced from the same area of land.


Why was the new system of farming so successful?

This new system of farming was remarkable because it was sustainable; the output of food was increased dramatically , without endangering the long-term viability of English agriculture . But just as a sustainable agriculture had been achieved, the development of chemical fertilisers and other external inputs undermined this sustainability. An essentially organic agriculture was gradually replaced by a farming system that depended on energy-intensive inputs dependent on the exploitation of fossil fuels.


What was the agricultural revolution?

The British Agricultural Revolution, or Second Agricultural Revolution, was the unprecedented increase in agricultural production in Britain due to increases in labor and land productivity between the mid-17th and late 19th centuries The Agricultural Revolution was a period of technological improvement and increased crop productivity that occurred during the 18th and early 19th centuries in Europe. In this lesson, learn the timeline, causes, effects and major inventions that spurred this shift in production. The Agricultural Revolution got its start in Great Britain in the early 18th century and spread throughout Europe and America by the 19th century. This was a period of significant agricultural development marked by new farming techniques and inventions that led to a massive increase in food production.


What were the taxes on the colonies before the Boston Massacre?

Prior to the Boston Massacre the British had instituted a number of new taxes on the American colonies including taxes on tea, glass, paper, paint, and lead. These taxes were part of a group of laws called the Townshend Acts. The colonies did not like these laws. They felt these laws were a violation of their rights. Just like when Britain imposed the Stamp Act, the colonists began to protest and the British brought in soldiers to keep order. The Boston Massacre was a signal event leading to the Revolutionary War. It led directly to the Royal Governor evacuating the occupying army from the town of Boston. It would soon bring the revolution to armed rebellion throughout the colonies.


What was the Protestant Reformation?

The Protestant Reformation was a major 16th century European movement aimed initially at reforming the beliefs and practices of the Roman Catholic Church. Its religious aspects were supplemented by ambitious political rulers who wanted to extend their power and control at the expense of the Church. The Reformation was a movement in Western Christianity in 16th-century Europe. Although the Reformation is usually considered to have started with the publication of the Ninety-five Theses by Martin Luther in 1517, there was no schism until the 1521 Edict of Worms. Because of corruption in the Catholic Church, some people saw a need to change the way it worked. The Protestant reformation triggered the Catholic Counter-Reformation. In general, Martin Luther’s posting of the 95 theses at Wittenberg is seen as the start of the Protestant Reformation. This happened in the year 1517.#N#The major causes of the protestant reformation include that of political, economic, social, and religious background. The religious causes involve problems with church authority and a monks views driven by his anger towards the church. Martin Luther was dissatisfied with the authority that clergy held over laypeople in the Catholic Church. Luther’s Protestant idea that clergy shouldn’t hold more religious authority than laypeople became very popular in Germany and spread quickly throughout Europe Reformation, also called Protestant Reformation, the religious revolution that took place in the Western church in the 16th century. … Having far-reaching political, economic, and social effects, the Reformation became the basis for the founding of Protestantism, one of the three major branches of Christianity.


What was the Mayflower Compact?

The Mayflower Compact was the first governing document of Plymouth Colony. It was written by the male passengers of the Mayflower, consisting of separatist Puritans, adventurers, and tradesmen. The Puritans were fleeing from religious persecution by King James of England. The Mayflower Compact was a set of rules for self-governance established by the English settlers who traveled to the New World on the Mayflower. When Pilgrims and other settlers set out on the ship for America in 1620, they intended to lay anchor in northern Virginia. But after treacherous shoals and storms drove their ship off course, the settlers landed in Massachusetts instead, near Cape Cod, outside of Virginia’s jurisdiction. Knowing life without laws could prove catastrophic, colonist leaders created the Mayflower Compact to ensure a functioning social structure would prevail.


What were the main developments in agriculture during the agricultural revolution?

In China, humans used flood and fire control to create rice paddies beginning around 6,000 B .C. They domesticated water buffalos and yaks to eat their meat and milk and their hair and hide to make clothing. In Mexico, humans selectively bred a wild plant called teosinte to create maize or corn. The earliest known corn cob dates from 3,500 B.C. These same humans grew squash, which would become a staple food throughout the Americas. At the same time in the Andes Mountains of South America, humans grew potatoes.


Where did the early agricultural revolution take place?

Archeological sites in China yield evidence of early rice paddies, while sites in the Americas have tools for the cultivation of potatoes, corn, and squash. The Fertile Crescent of the Middle East contains the most evidence for the agricultural revolution. Archeological sites at Catalhoyuk, Abu Hureyra, and elsewhere reveal evidence of growing grain, cultivating fruit trees, and domesticating animals.


Why did the first agricultural revolution occur?

Because this revolution began about 14,000 years ago at the end of the last Ice Age, experts theorize the warmer climate drove early humans to plant crops and build homes. At the same time, humans developed aspects of culture like religion and art. Archeologists have discovered cave art and figurines from this period. These discoveries demonstrate how humans had developed greater intellectual capabilities than their ancestors. Additionally, these new beliefs may have encouraged humans to settle in a permanent community with like-minded people.


What was the second agricultural revolution?

The Second Agricultural Revolution, or the British Agricultural Revolution, began during the 18th century. Major changes to farming techniques, which included livestock breeding, crop rotation, and mechanical farm equipment, decreased the number of workers needed on farms.


How did agriculture change the world?

The innovations in agriculture radically changed how humans produced food. Crop rotation and livestock breeding resulted in higher yields, while new mechanical equipment required fewer workers. Because their work was no longer needed, people traveled to cities to find work. Some people were desperate for employment in factories or other city jobs. Their small family farms could not compete with larger, industrial farms, or modern farming equipment had rendered their labor obsolete. In contrast, the children of successful farmers could now leave their families to look for other employment without worrying about who would work on the farm. The surplus produce from industrial farms could be sold to city dwellers, which in turn allowed more people to have occupations other than farming.


How did the agricultural revolution affect people?

The agricultural revolutions affected how people worked and got their food. The first caused people to grow crops and raise animals for food. The second caused people to move into cities and work in factories . The third led to an increase in human population.


Why was the Third Agricultural Revolution called the Green Revolution?

This time period received its name because of the emphasis on creating crops that yielded the most produce. Improvement in fertilizers and irrigation allowed crops to grow in climates previously too dry. Agricultural scientists like American researcher Norman Borlaug bred plants resistant to disease, produced more grain, and responded well to fertilizers. Industrial farms raised a single strain of highly productive plant. While these homogeneous crops increased yield, they were less disease-resistant and elevated the need for pesticides.


What was the agricultural revolution?

The Agricultural Revolution was a major event in world history and had a profound effect on populations throughout Europe and other historical events. For example, many historians consider the Agricultural Revolution to be a major cause of the Industrial Revolution, especially in terms of when and how it began in Britain.


What were the main features of the agricultural revolution?

Jethro Tull. Another important feature of the Agricultural Revolution was the Enclosure Movement . In the decades and centuries before the 1700s, British farmers planted their crops on small strips of land while allowing their animals to graze on common fields shared collectively.


How did the agricultural revolution affect the Industrial Revolution?

As stated previously, the increased food production allowed Britain’s population to also increase which benefitted the Industrial Revolution in two ways. First, the increased population helped produce workers for the factories and mines that were so important to the Industrial Revolution. Second, the larger population created a market for goods to sold to which helped the owners of the factories to make a profit off of the sale of their goods.


How did the increase in food production help the Industrial Revolution?

First, the increased population helped produce workers for the factories and mines that were so important to the Industrial Revolution.


Why was the increase in population important to the beginning of the Industrial Revolution?

The increased population was important to the beginning of the Industrial Revolution because it created a large workforce for the factories and mines that would be common during the time. A key aspect of the Industrial Revolution was the invention of different types of machines, many of which were used in farming and agriculture. …


Why did European farmers not plant the same crop every year?

This would cause them to have to not plant anything in the field every few years in order to avoid destroying the quality of the soil.


When did the Industrial Revolution begin?

For example, the Industrial Revolution began in Britain in the 18th century due in part to an increase in food production, which was the key outcome of the Agricultural Revolution. As such, the Agricultural Revolution is considered to have begun in the 17th century and continued throughout the centuries that followed, …


What was the agricultural revolution?

The Agricultural Revolution was a period of technological improvement and increased crop productivity that occurred during the 18th and early 19th centuries in Europe. In this lesson, learn the timeline, causes, effects and major inventions that spurred this shift in production. Create an account.


What were the factors that contributed to the agricultural revolution?

The increased agricultural production of the 18th century can be traced to four interrelated factors: The increased availability of farmland. A favorable climate.


How did crop rotation and livestock utilization affect society?

New patterns of crop rotation and livestock utilization paved the way for better crop yields, a greater diversity of wheat and vegetables and the ability to support more livestock . These changes impacted society as the population became better nourished and healthier.


How did the boost in livestock affect the diet of much of Europe?

Not only were Europeans consuming more meat, but the livestock was producing much needed fertilizer for crops. The addition of fertilizer allowed an improved production rate per acre.


Why were turnips important to farmers?

The cultivation of turnips was important because they could be left in the ground through the winter.


Why was the crop of wheat so popular in Europe?

Because this crop was incredibly easy to grow, was high in carbohydrates, calories and essential vitamins and could be stored successfully , it became a necessity for many of Europe’s poor. Landowners began to enclose fields that were formerly open.


Who created tools that greatly influenced the new agriculture?

Several innovators created tools that greatly influenced the new agriculture. For instance, a significant step forward was pioneered by Jethro Tull, an English agriculturist.


What was the agricultural revolution?

All that changed in the 18th century with the agricultural revolution, a period of agricultural development that saw a massive and rapid increase in agricultural productivity and vast improvements in farm technology.


When was sugar farming and processing in the West Indies?

Early sugar farming and processing by slaves in the West Indies, 1753. Print Collector / Hulton Archive / Getty Images


What was the impact of the cotton gin on the South?

The cotton gin had turned the whole South toward the cultivation of cotton. While the South was not manufacturing any considerable proportion of the cotton it grew, the textile industry was flourishing in the North. A whole series of machines similar to those used in Great Britain had been invented in America and mills paid higher wages than in Britain. Production was also far ahead of the British mills in proportion to hands employed, which meant the U.S. was ahead of the rest of the world.


What happened between the eighth century and the eighteenth century?

Updated August 11, 2019. Between the eighth century and the eighteenth, the tools of farming basically stayed the same and few advancements in technology were made. This meant that the farmers of George Washington’s day had no better tools than the farmers of Julius Caesar’s day.


Who invented the seed planter?

Seed planters for corn came somewhat later, as machines to plant wheat successfully were unsuited for corn planting. In 1701, Jethro Tull invented his seed drill and is perhaps the best-known inventor of a mechanical planter.


Did textile mills have free land?

Additionally, there was a good supply of free land or land that was practically free. Wages were high enough that many could save enough to buy their own land. Workers in textile mills often worked only a few years to save money, buy a farm or to enter some business or profession.


What was the British agricultural revolution?

The British Agricultural Revolution refers to the period of change from the traditional to modern farming systems in Britain that occurred between the mid-1600s and the late 1800s. Before the revolution, the open-field system of cultivation was used which caused cattle overgrazing, uncontrolled breeding, and spread of animal diseases.


How did the agricultural revolution affect the industrial revolution?

A further increase in population provided labor for the industries. The agricultural revolution, which led to a greater abundance of food, had led to significant reductions in the prices of foodstuffs. The population thus had more disposable income to spend on industrial products. The need to sustain food production inspired more inventions in technology which facilitated the industrial revolution. During the agricultural period, the United Kingdom became economically prosperous and wealthy as farmers acquired capital to invest in industries and technology. The innovations in Agricultural revolution, coupled with improved infrastructure further fueled the industrial revolution.


What were the factors that facilitated the Revolution?

Several factors facilitated the revolution, the first being acts of Parliamentary legislation regarding land enclosure. A series of Parliamentary legislation in the United Kingdom promoted land consolidation, either owned or rented. The aim of this system was to establish separate chunks of land to allow efficient and economical utilization of land. The acts laid the foundation for a land-owning system in Britain. Large tracts of land could be utilized for agricultural purposes, and productivity increased. The formation of agricultural societies and annual shows facilitated innovation and the spread of ideas. More efficient methods were adopted as knowledge became widespread. Other factors were changing climatic conditions, increased populations of livestock, innovations and higher yields.


What were the innovations of the Revolution?

Notable innovations included the seed drill, which was invented by Jethro Tull and enabled seeds to be planted deep into the soil mechanically. Previously, seeds had been planted on the top layer and were quickly washed away or lost.


What was the main crop rotation system?

The crop rotation system, championed by agriculturalists such as Charles Townshend, was widely adopted by farmers. In the system, fodder crops such as turnips and clover were planted instead of leaving the land fallow. Clover and Turnips were fed to cattle and also improved the soil fertility.


What were the innovations that helped farmers?

Numerous other innovations included the Hay-tossing machine, the flying shuttle, the spinning jenny, and Crompton’s mule for the production of yarn. As more and more innovations were made, agriculture increasingly became automated.


How did the Industrial Revolution affect the UK?

Better infrastructure meant that produce reached local and international markets through exports. As food production increased, a rise in population was experienced as more people could be sustained. A large population in the UK became non-land holders as the tenure system of land came into effect, a situation which created a large market for agricultural produce and help boost trade. Improved trade enabled growth of the banking sector and development of loan facilities as economic assistance to farmers, and therefore underpinning industrial revolution.


What was the result of the English agricultural revolution?

The result was an increase in productivity and a decrease in labor in agriculture.


What was the British economy like before the agricultural revolution?

Before the agricultural revolution of the 18th century began, the British economy was very traditional . Almost 75% of the jobs were concentrated in the primary sector. The scarce existing industry maintained trade union and artisan characteristics.


What was the antecedent of the Industrial Revolution?

In addition to the aforementioned increase in agricultural productivity, the revolution is seen as an immediate antecedent to the Industrial Revolution. In the countryside, there was a surplus of labor, so the workers had to emigrate to the cities and seek new jobs in the industries that began to appear.


How did the agricultural revolution affect society?

The agricultural revolution also had social effects. Large owners were the ones who benefited from the changes that had occurred, while smallholders and day laborers suffered the negative effects.


How was agricultural property organized?

On the other hand, agricultural property was highly concentrated in the hands of a few. The most common is that the land was organized into huge large estates . The owners obtained their earnings from the payment of the rents that the peasants were obliged to pay. It was, almost, a system that had maintained a feudal structure.


What was England’s economic system?

England, like the rest of Europe, based its economic system on agriculture . As early as the 13th century, some novel techniques had been introduced that had improved productivity, but, over time, these changes had become less effective. When the 18th century arrived, the large landowners looked for ways to increase their profits.


What did the scarce existing industry maintain?

The scarce existing industry maintained trade union and artisan characteristics. This meant that the number of workers employed in these industries was very small and that the introduction of complex machinery was not necessary.

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Overview

The British Agricultural Revolution, or Second Agricultural Revolution, was an unprecedented increase in agricultural production in Britain arising from increases in labour and land productivity between the mid-17th and late 19th centuries. Agricultural output grew faster than the population over the hundred-year period ending in 1770, and thereafter productivity remained among the hi…


Major developments and innovations

The British Agricultural Revolution was the result of the complex interaction of social, economic and farming technological changes. Major developments and innovations include:
• Norfolk four-course crop rotation: Fodder crops, particularly turnips and clover, replaced leaving the land fallow.
• The Dutch improved the Chinese plough so that it could be pulled with fewer oxen or horses.


British agriculture, 1800–1900

Besides the organic fertilisers in manure, new fertilisers were slowly discovered. Massive sodium nitrate (NaNO3) deposits found in the Atacama Desert, Chile, were brought under British financiers like John Thomas North and imports were started. Chile was happy to allow the exports of these sodium nitrates by allowing the British to use their capital to develop the mining and imposing a hefty export tax to enrich their treasury. Massive deposits of sea bird guano (11–16% N, 8–12% p…


Significance

The Agricultural Revolution was part of a long process of improvement, but sound advice on farming began to appear in England in the mid-17th century, from writers such as Samuel Hartlib, Walter Blith and others, and the overall agricultural productivity of Britain started to grow significantly only in the period of the Agricultural Revolution. It is estimated that total agricultural output grew 2.7-fold between 1700 and 1870 and output per worker at a similar rate.


See also

• Agriculture in the United Kingdom#History
• Scottish Agricultural Revolution


Further reading

• Ang, James B., Rajabrata Banerjee, and Jakob B. Madsen. “Innovation and productivity advances in British agriculture: 1620–1850”. Southern Economic Journal 80.1 (2013): 162–186.
• Campbell, Bruce M. S., and Mark Overton. “A new perspective on medieval and early modern agriculture: six centuries of Norfolk farming c. 1250-c. 1850.” Past and Present (1993): 38-105. JSTOR 651030.


External links

• “Agricultural Revolution in England 1500–1850″—BBC History

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