Which statement best characterizes american agriculture from 1900 to 2002

What was the most important advance of the 1870s in agriculture?

The most important advance of the 1870s was the use of both silos, and the wide use of deep-well drilling, two advances that enabled larger farms and higher production of marketable surpluses.

Which type of economic activity is marking agricultural products?

Marketing agricultural products is a secondary economic activity. Shifting cultivation is best described as __________. Which of the following is not one of the three important developments that was made in agriculture in the past 50 years?

When did farmers start using Low-Input Sustainable Agriculture?

By the end of the 1880s, farmers were using low-input sustainable agriculture (LISA) techniques to decrease chemical applications. 1980 —Total population: 227,020,000; Farm population: 6,051,00; Farmers made up 3.4% of labor force; Number of farms: 2,439,510; Average acres: 426; Irrigated acres: 50,350,000 (1978)

What was the impact of the Great Depression on agriculture?

1920 –1 940 —Gradual increase in farm production resulted from the expanded use of mechanized power While the damage of the Great Depression and the Dust Bowl lasted for a generation, the farm economy rebounded with advances in better irrigation methods and conservation tillage.


How did agriculture change in the 1900s?

In 1900, the farmer performed chores by hand, plowed with a walking plow, forked hay, milked by hand, and went to town once a week on horseback or by wagon to obtain the few necessities not produced on the farm. The power needed for farm operations was supplied by work animals and humans.


How did agriculture Change From 1865 1900?

Boom and bust economic cycles (panic and prosperity) occurred between 1865 and 1900. Improved farm machinery, irrigation, and chemical fertilizers led to increased production. Farmers in distress led to the emergence of movements such as the Grange, Farmers’ Alliances, and Populists.


How has agriculture changed over the years?

Farms have changed a lot in the last 50 years. Farms are bigger, livestock are usually raised inside, yields are higher, less manual labor is needed, and it’s not common to see dairy cows, beef cattle, pigs, and poultry on the same farm.


How has agriculture changed over the past 100 years?

While American farming has certainly expanded and increased its value since 1920, there were almost three times as many farms 100 years ago than there are today—in 1920 there were 6.5 million farms, while 2020 estimates come in at two million.


What led to the decline in farming in the late 1800s and mid 1900s?

Farmers were able to produce more goods, yet they overproduced and it resulted in economic hardship for them. They could not afford to export goods through the rail roads high rates, and led to clashing with the government, for the lack of support. Such factors resulted in change of American agriculture.


What challenges did farmers face in the late 1800s early 1900s?

After the Civil War, drought, plagues of grasshoppers, boll weevils, rising costs, falling prices, and high interest rates made it increasingly difficult to make a living as a farmer.


How has farming changed in the United States?

We found that the use of two major inputs—land and labor—decreased over time. Between 1982 and 2007, land used in agriculture dropped from 54 to 51 percent of total U.S. land area, while farming used 30 percent less hired labor and 40 percent less operator labor.


What were the major changes in the agriculture?

There were two major changes in agriculture around this time. One was the growing use of iron plough shares. This meant that heavy, clayey soil could be turned over better than with a wooden plough share, so that more grain could be produced. Second, people began transplanting paddy.


How were farmers affected in the 1920s?

While most Americans enjoyed relative prosperity for most of the 1920s, the Great Depression for the American farmer really began after World War I. Much of the Roaring ’20s was a continual cycle of debt for the American farmer, stemming from falling farm prices and the need to purchase expensive machinery.


Which period was an era of great change in American agriculture and why?

Which period was an era of great change in american agriculture and why? ​ Answer: Answer: the beginning of the 19th century for the movement of almost 700000 settlers through passes on to the appalachian plateau.


What major changes took place in farming practices during the 20th century?

What major changes took place in farming practices during the 20th century? Farming became more mechanized and fossil fuels used for energy increased, which lead to increase in food output and had environmental impacts.


What was a major effect of the agricultural revolution in the United States?

The increase in agricultural production and technological advancements during the Agricultural Revolution contributed to unprecedented population growth and new agricultural practices, triggering such phenomena as rural-to-urban migration, development of a coherent and loosely regulated agricultural market, and …


How did agriculture change in the 1900s?

From being primitive in the manner in which the farming was done, the agricultural field became much more modernized. The new technologies had invented lot of mechanization specifically for this field, and that has helped a lot. The food production skyrocketed because the mechanization was making everything much more easy. The work on much larger areas was done much quicker, more efficient, and cheaper. That has resulted in much higher production of food, which in turn resulted in higher demand for labor force. The labor force in the agriculture though gradually has changed, as the Americans themselves started to avoid the farming, but the immigrants from Latin America welcomed the opportunity and gradually became the dominant labor force in this field.


What percentage of the population was engaged in farming in 1900?

Before 1900 more Americans were engaged in farming and about 90 percent of the population are engage in farming. The farming was mainly for subsistence purpose to carter for the family. As the population increases more lands were used for farming .


How much labor was required to produce 100 bushels of corn in 1890?

By 1890, labor costs continued to decrease, with only 35–40 labor-hours required to produce 100 bushels (2-1/2 acres) of corn, because of technological advances of the 2-bottom gang plow, disk and peg-tooth harrow, and 2-row planters; and 40–50 labor-hours required to produce 100 bushels (5 acres) of wheat with gang plow, seeder, harrow, binder, thresher, wagons, and horses.


What was the most important cash crop in the Old South?

1815–1830 —Cotton became the most important cash crop in the Old South.


What was the Homestead Act of 1862?

1862 —Homestead Act granted 160 acres to settlers who had worked the land 5 years. 1865–1870 —The sharecropping system in the South replaced the old plantation system that utilized stolen labor, knowledge, and skills from enslaved people. 1865–1890 —Influx of Scandinavian immigrants.


What was the second agricultural revolution?

1945–1955 —Increased use of herbicides and pesticides. 1945–1970 —Change from horses to tractors and the adoption of a group of technological practices characterized the second American agriculture agricultural revolution.


What was the most important advance of the 1870s?

The most important advance of the 1870s was the use of both silos, and the wide use of deep-well drilling, two advances that enabled larger farms and higher production of marketable surpluses.


What was the agricultural industry in the 1850s?

The 1850s —Commercial corn and wheat belts began to develop; wheat occupied the newer and cheaper land west of the corn areas and was constantly being forced westward by rising land values and the encroachment of the corn areas. The 1850s —Alfalfa is grown on the west coast.


What states were the chief wheat states in 1840?

1840–1850 —New York, Pennsylvania, and Ohio were the chief wheat States. 1840–1860 —Hereford, Ayrshire, Galloway, Jersey, and Holstein cattle were imported and bred. 1840–1860 —Growth in manufacturing brought many laborsaving devices to the farm home.


1776–1800


1800–1830


The 1830s

  • By the 1830s, about 250-300 labor-hours were required to produce 100 bushels (5 acres) of wheat using a walking plow, brush harrow, hand broadcast of seed, sickle, and flail. 1. 1830—Peter Cooper’s railroad steam engine, the Tom Thumb, ran 13 miles 2. 1830—Total population: 12,866,020 3. 1830—The Mississippi River formed the approximate frontier boundary 4. The 183…

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The 1840s

  • The growing use of factory-made agricultural machinery increased the farmers’ need for cash and encouraged commercial farming. 1. 1840—Justos Liebig’s Organic Chemistry appeared 2. 1840–1850—New York, Pennsylvania, and Ohio were the chief wheat States 3. 1840–1860—Hereford, Ayrshire, Galloway, Jersey, and Holstein cattle were imported and bred 4…

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The 1850s

  • By 1850, about 75–90 labor-hours were required to produce 100 bushels of corn (2-1/2 acres) with walking plow, harrow, and hand planting. 1. 1850—Total population: 23,191,786; Farm population: 11,680,000 (estimated); Farmers made up 64% of labor force; Number of farms: 1,449,000; Average acres: 203 2. The 1850s—Commercial corn and wheat belts began to develo…

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The 1860s

  • The early 1860s witnessed a dramatic change from hand power to horses, which historians characterize as the first American agricultural revolution 1. 1860—Total population: 31,443,321; Farm population: 15,141,000 (estimated); Farmers made up 58% of labor force; Number of farms: 2,044,000; Average acres: 199 2. The 1860s—Kerosene lamps became popula…

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The 1870s

  • The most important advance of the 1870s was the use of both silos, and the wide use of deep-well drilling, two advances that enabled larger farms and higher production of marketable surpluses. 1. 1870—Total population: 38,558,371; Farm population: 18,373,000 (estimated); Farmers made up 53% of labor force; Number of farms: 2,660,000; Average acres: 153 2. The 18…

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The 1880s

  1. 1880—Total population: 50,155,783; Farm population: 22,981,000 (estimated); Farmers made up 49% of labor force; Number of farms: 4,009,000; Average acres: 134
  2. The 1880s—Heavy agricultural settlement on the Great Plains began
  3. The 1880s—The cattle industry moved into the western and southwestern Great Plains
  4. 1880—Most humid land already settled

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The 1890s

  • By 1890, labor costs continued to decrease, with only 35–40 labor-hours required to produce 100 bushels (2-1/2 acres) of corn, because of technological advances of the 2-bottom gang plow, disk and peg-tooth harrow, and 2-row planters; and 40–50 labor-hours required to produce 100 bushels (5 acres) of wheat with gang plow, seeder, harrow, binder, thresher, wagons, and horses. 1. 1890…

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