Who discovered advanced methods of agriculture

image

Full
Answer

When was agriculture invented?

Since there was no form of immediate communication, they could not share their innovations, resulting in varying evidence dates of the initiation of agriculture. The majority of the reports suggest the earliest be from ‘Southwest Asia.’

What is the best book on the history of Agriculture?

I, The Agrarian Life of the Middle Ages (Cambridge UP, 1971) Teall, John L. (1959). “The grain supply of the Byzantine Empire, 330–1025”. Dumbarton Oaks Papers. 13: 87–139. doi: 10.2307/1291130. JSTOR 1291130. Yasuda, Y., ed. The Origins of Pottery and Agriculture (SAB, 2003) Collingham, E.M.

What event enabled the evolution of Agriculture?

The lesser-known reason is that the humans thought of agriculture as a more efficient way of getting food rather than moving about ‘hunting and gathering.’ No one event, in particular, enabled the evolution of agriculture. The Earth has since the beginning a developing planet.

What was the first civilization to develop a specialized agricultural workforce?

Around 5500 BC (7, p26-28), the Sumerian civilization of the Middle East and other early pre Greco-Roman civilizations understood the need for a specialized agricultural workforce for their societies to thrive.

image


How did agricultural science develop?

Agricultural science developed when analytical chemistry began to address organic compounds. Fertilization with decomposed plants sometimes gave a whiff of ammonia, which suggested a role for nitrogen in biological growth.


What is the history of agriculture?

The history of agricultural science is a sub-field of the history of agriculture which looks at the scientific advancement of techniques and understanding of agriculture. Early study of organic production in botanical gardens was continued in with agricultural experiment stations in several countries. Fertilizer is a major contribution …


What was the first method of soil nourishment?

The first method of soil nourishment utilized compost. Composting used rotten organic materials to replenish the soil of its nutrients and dates back to tenth and twelfth century Arab writings. Composting was a normal and widely used practice of fertilization, up into the twentieth century. Johann Friedrich Mayer was the first scientist …


When was fertilizer discovered?

Scientific study of fertilizer was advanced significantly in 1840 with the publication Die organische Chemie in ihrer Anwendung auf Agrikulturchemie und Physiologie (Organic Chemistry in Its Applications to Agriculture and Physiology) by Justus von Liebig. One of Liebig’s advances in agricultural science was the discovery …


What was Liebig’s most important discovery?

One of Liebig’s advances in agricultural science was the discovery of nitrogen as an essential plant nutrient.


Who came up with the Haber-Bosch process?

Haber discovered the reaction process to produce ammonia and Bosh was able to pressurize it to complete the process. Together Haber and Bosch came up with the Haber-Bosch process that fixated nitrogen to produce ammonia that is used in most fertilizers.


When did agriculture start in schools?

In 1917 the Smith–Hughes Act allowed agricultural education to enter public schools in the United States.


When was agriculture invented?

Humans invented agriculture between 7,000 and 10,000 years ago, during the Neolithic era, or the New Stone Age.


What is the history of agriculture?

Agriculture, also known as farming, is the production of food, fiber, animal feed, and other goods by means of growing and harvesting plants and animals. Agriculture is practiced throughout the world. Many agricultural products are used every day, from the clothes we put on in the morning to the sheets we sleep


What were the inventions of the Bronze Age?

During the Bronze Age and the eras that followed, civilizations all over the world gradually invented or acquired advanced metalworking techniques, creating ever-stronger farming implements. Humans continued domesticating animals and plants to serve as food sources or sources of other useful products. During the Middle Ages, European farmers began using complex irrigation systems such as dams, reservoirs, and water-raising machines. They also developed a three-field system of crop rotation and the moldboard plow. These inventions greatly increased the efficiency of agriculture.


How did hybrid seeds contribute to agriculture?

Hybrid seeds contributed to the increased agricultural output of the second half of the 20th century.


What is the oldest method of irrigation?

Conversely, when the waters were low, the land dried up, killing crops. The oldest method of irrigation made use of man-made underground streams, called qanats, and is still being used in parts of the Middle East.


When was the combine harvester invented?

Plows and other farming implements improved, and the mechanical combine harvester—a machine that harvests grain—was invented in the 1830s. In the early 1900s, the horse-drawn plow was a catalyst for introducing more machinery on the farm.


Where did agriculture originate?

The history of agriculture begins in the Fertile Crescent. This area of Western Asia comprises the regions of Mesopotamia and Levant while being confined by the Syrian Desert to the south and the Anatolian Plateau to the north. In the early 1900s, University of Chicago archaeologist James Henry Breasted coined the term “Fertile Crescent” to describe this location’s role as the birthplace of agriculture. It has often been called the “Cradle of Civilization” as well, since both the wheel and writing first appeared there. Modern Turkey, Iran, Iraq, Syria, Lebanon, Israel, Jordan, and the Palestinian territories all include some land within the Fertile Crescent.


When did agriculture start?

From as early as 11,000 BCE, people began a gradual transition away from a hunter-gatherer lifestyle toward cultivating crops and raising animals for food. The shift to agriculture is believed to have occurred independently in several parts of the world, including northern China, Central America, and the Fertile Crescent, a region in the Middle East that cradled some of the earliest civilizations. 1 By 6000 BCE, most of the farm animals we are familiar with today had been domesticated. 1 By 5000 BCE, agriculture was practiced in every major continent except Australia. 2


How long has agriculture been around?

It is thought to have been practiced sporadically for the past 13,000 years, 1 and widely established for only 7,000 years. 2 In the long view of human history, this is just a flash in the pan compared to the nearly 200,000 years our ancestors spent gathering, hunting, and scavenging in the wild. During its brief history, agriculture has radically transformed human societies and fueled a global population that has grown from 4 million to 7 billion since 10,000 BCE, and is still growing. 3


What is the name of the wild food that nourished our hunter-gatherer ancestors?

Left to right: Gingerbread plum ( mobola ), baobab seed, carissa fruit. These wild foods, native to Africa, may resemble the fruits, nuts, and seeds that nourished our hunter-gatherer ancestors. There is growing interest in cultivating these “lost” crops on a larger scale—the carissa fruit tastes a little like cranberry …


How did small settlements grow into cities?

1. Agriculture produced enough food that people became free to pursue interests other than worrying about what they were going to eat that day. Those who didn’t need to be farmers took on roles as soldiers, priests, administrators, artists, and scholars.


What was the driving force behind the growth of civilizations?

For better or for worse, agriculture was a driving force behind the growth of civilizations.


When was the plow used in Egypt?

Grave chamber of an Egyptian public official, circa 1250 BCE. The plow is believed to have been used as early as 4,000 years ago in ancient Egypt. Although it brought tremendous gains in short-term productivity, it has also been a major contributor to soil erosion.


When was synthetic fertilizer invented?

First introduced in the early 1900s, synthetic fertilizers dramatically increased crop yields (though not without consequences ), and have been credited with providing the lion’s share of the world’s food over the 20 th century. 27 The use of these and other chemicals has become a hallmark of industrial agriculture.


When did agriculture start in North America?

It is likely that agriculture came to the North America relatively late, perhaps between 2500 and 2000 BC and we see it extensively with such civilizations as the Hohokam, the Anasazi and ancient Pueblos (17), possibly developing in Mesoamerica around 6000 BC with the domestication of maize.


Where did the Romans get their agricultural technology?

The Greeks and Romans took much of their agricultural technology from other civilizations with which they had contact – most notably those of the ancient Near East such as Mesopotamia, via Sumeria. From Egypt, those societies took direct influence once the country was conquered by Alexander the Great and later by the Roman Republic. It was here at the birth of modern civilization that we saw true large-scale animal and plant agriculture (10). Technology may not have advanced a great deal, but the processes made agriculture efficient enough to sustain the empire’s large cities, making it a necessary industry.


What were the crops of Mesoamerica?

In Mesoamerica and South America, with the Inca, the Maya, Olmecs and the Aztecs, relatively early development of agriculture permitted the building of enormous cities that impressed the European colonizers; it was quickly identified that these civilizations had an impressive agriculture-based economy that stood on a par with Europe, challenging what was then understood about the development of civilization. In Mesoamerica it was corn and in South America it was the humble potato (18) – today the staple crop of most people in the western world, along with coca and the domestication of animal species such as llama and alpaca.


What did hunter-gatherers do?

For most of our existence, humans were hunter-gatherers. This means that people lived a nomadic lifestyle, moving with the seasons to follow the food supply. As the glaciers retreated and plant life patterns and growth areas changed in response, it meant that the need to move so often became slightly less essential – though undoubtedly the lifestyle carried on for thousands of years as people sought to maximize their resource acquisition (4, p574-5). Hunter-gatherer societies would have known which crops were best to exploit with each season.


What was the Middle East’s agricultural revolution?

The Middle East continued to see much innovation in the agricultural industries, something that historians refer to as The Arab Agricultural Revolution (10). This was thanks to the diversity of the local topographies, the crops grown in the Middle East and Indus Valley that European societies coveted, and later acted as a trade bridge between Far East and Europe (11).


What is the early civilization?

Early Civilization. Early civilization can be considered a boom time in agricultural science and technology. Around 5500 BC (7, p26-28), the Sumerian civilization of the Middle East and other early pre Greco-Roman civilizations understood the need for a specialized agricultural workforce for their societies to thrive.


How did farming start?

The three field crop rotation system was replaced with a four field system and sweeping enclosure acts regulated land management, selective cross-breeding began on an industrial scale to increase crop size as well as yields creating several cultivars in the process. Animal husbandry also improved, leading to a greater surplus than had been permissible under the old system. It is said that these changes permitted the industrial revolution and even greater concentration of urban development, fueling the empire. How so? More crops for fewer workers, better methods of keeping and replacing nutrients in the soil meant that more people could work in industry. When the Corn Laws in England were repealed, it began the global food economy; about the same time, Charles Darwin’s Theory of Evolution put agriculture on the modern path of a science as we began to understand the development of crops.


Why did people start farming?

In the Near East, for example, it’s thought that climatic changes at the end of the last ice age brought seasonal conditions that favored annual plants like wild cereals. Elsewhere, such as in East Asia, increased pressure on natural food resources may have forced people to find homegrown solutions. But whatever the reasons for its independent origins, farming sowed the seeds for the modern age.


What was the farming revolution?

Taking root around 12,000 years ago, agriculture triggered such a change in society and the way in which people lived that its development has been dubbed the ” Neolithic Revolution.”. Traditional hunter-gatherer lifestyles, followed by humans since their evolution, were swept aside in favor of permanent settlements …


What mutation occurred during the spread of farming into southeastern Europe?

But at some point during the spread of farming into southeastern Europe, a mutation occurred for lactose tolerance that increased in frequency through natural selection thanks to the nourishing benefits of milk.


Where did wheat come from?

The wild progenitors of crops including wheat, barley and peas are traced to the Near East region. Cereals were grown in Syria as long as 9,000 years ago, while figs were cultivated even earlier; prehistoric seedless fruits discovered in the Jordan Valley suggest fig trees were being planted some 11,300 years ago.


When did corn cobs first appear?

While maize-like plants derived from teosinte appear to have been cultivated at least 9,000 years ago, the first directly dated corn cob dates only to around 5,500 years ago . Corn later reached North America, where cultivated sunflowers also started to bloom some 5,000 years ago.


How long ago did goats come to Europe?

Dates for the domestication of these animals range from between 13,000 to 10,000 years ago. Genetic studies show that goats and other livestock accompanied the westward spread of agriculture into Europe, helping to revolutionize Stone Age society. While the extent to which farmers themselves migrated west remains a subject of debate, …


When did rice and millet farming start?

The origins of rice and millet farming date to around 6,000 B.C.E.


Who is the father of chemistry?

Robert Boyle’ s contribution to the theory of steam power has been mentioned, but Boyle is more commonly recognized as the “father of chemistry,” in which field he was responsible for the recognition of an element as a material that cannot be resolved into other substances. It was not until the end of the 18th and the beginning of the 19th century, however, that the work of Antoine Lavoisier and John Dalton put modern chemical science on a firm theoretical basis. Chemistry was still struggling to free itself from the traditions of alchemy. Even alchemy was not without practical applications, for it promoted experiments with materials and led to the development of specialized laboratory equipment that was used in the manufacture of dyes, cosmetics, and certain pharmaceutical products. For the most part, pharmacy still relied upon recipes based on herbs and other natural products, but the systematic preparation of these eventually led to the discovery of useful new drugs.


How was the quadrant improved?

The needs of reliable navigation created a demand for better instruments. The quadrant was improved by conversion to the octant , using mirrors to align the image of a star with the horizon and to measure its angle more accurately: with further refinements the modern sextant evolved. Even more significant was the ingenuity shown by scientists and instrument makers in the construction of a clock that would keep accurate time at sea: such a clock, by showing the time in Greenwich when it was noon aboard ship would show how far east or west of Greenwich the ship lay (longitude). A prize of £20,000 was offered by the British Board of Longitude for this purpose in 1714, but it was not awarded until 1763 when John Harrison’s so-called No. 4 chronometer fulfilled all the requirements.


Why were dikes important to the Dutch?

The Dutch, wrestling with the sea for centuries, had devised extensive dikes; their techniques were borrowed by English landowners in the 17th century in an attempt to reclaim tracts of fenlands.


What was the major change in the 18th century?

Agriculture. Another major area that began to show signs of profound change in the 18th century was agriculture. Stimulated by greater commercial activity, the rising market for food caused by an increasing population aspiring to a higher standard of living, and by the British aristocratic taste for improving estates to provide affluent …


What is the first proof of agriculture?

The first noticeable commonly agreed upon proof is ‘The Fertile Crescent, ’ also known as ‘Cradle of Civilization,’ claimed to birth the idea of agriculture. Mesopotamia and Levant regions were also part of this Crescent.


When did Agriculture Begin?

If we look at our history, there have always been patterns in which things came about. We just have to take a deeper look into it to decipher the code. The same is in the case of agriculture.


Why do weeds grow with crops?

Weeds are unwanted plants that grow with the main crop due to the availability of favorable conditions. But these also utilize the nutrients and fertilizers necessary for the growth of the crop. This causes the crops to suffer from malnutrition and stunted growth, the same of which the human consuming it will suffer too.


What are the three types of insects that evolved with agriculture?

The same happened in the case of the evolution of agriculture in insects. Notably, 3 types of insects also evolved with agriculture – Ants, Termites, and Ambrosia Beetles.


What happened since the dawn of agriculture?

Since the dawn of agriculture, it underwent innumerable changes. Along with humans, creatures of all kinds were also affected, either directly or indirectly.


What is timeline in agriculture?

A timeline shows the step-by-step development of agricultural advancements in tools, production time and cost, profit, loss, and much more.


What are the factors that contributed to the transition of humans from being hunter-gatherers to agriculture?

Two of the major factors are –. Climate change – Earth was entering into a warmer trend at the end of the last Ice Age.


What is the origin of agriculture?

origins of agriculture, the active production of useful plants or animals in ecosystems that have been created by people. Agriculture has often been conceptualized narrowly, in terms of specific combinations of activities and organisms—wet-rice production in Asia, wheat farming in Europe, cattle


Why is agriculture a cultural phenomenon?

Because it is a cultural phenomenon, agriculture has varied considerably across time and space. Domesticated plants and animals have been (and continue to be) raised at scales ranging from the household to massive commercial operations.


What is the process of domestication?

Domesticationis a biological process in which, under human selection, organisms develop characteristics that increase their utility, as when plants provide larger seeds, fruit, or tubers than their wild progenitors. Known as cultigens, domesticated plants come from a wide range of families (groups of closely related genera that share a common ancestor; seegenus). The grass(Poaceae), bean(Fabaceae), and nightshadeor potato(Solanaceae) families have produced a disproportionately large number of cultigens because they have characteristics that are particularly amenableto domestication.


Why are domesticated animals more docile than wild animals?

Domesticated animals tend to have developed from species that are social in the wild and that, like plants, could be bred to increase the traits that are advantageous for people. Most domesticated animals are more docile than their wild counterparts, and they often produce more meat, wool, or milk as well.


Is agriculture an environmental engineer?

Agriculture has often been conceptualized narrowly, in terms of specific combinations of activities and organisms—wet-rice production in Asia, wheat farming in Europe, cattle ranching in the Americas, and the like—but a more holistic perspective holds that humans are environmental engineers who disrupt terrestrial habitats in specific ways.


What did farmers do to survive?

Original farmers developed crops and animals that grew and thrived in different environments. In the process, they developed adaptations to maintain soils, ward off frost and freeze cycles, and protect their crops from animals.


Why do humans need to cooperate in a garden?

Garden produce has value, so a group of humans must cooperate to the extent that they can protect themselves and their produce from those who would steal it. Many of the earliest horticulturalists also lived in fortified communities .


What is mixed cropping?

Mixed cropping, also known as inter-cropping or co-cultivation, is a type of agriculture that involves planting two or more of plants simultaneously in the same field. Unlike our monocultural systems today (illustrated in the photo), inter-cropping provides a number of benefits, including natural resistance to crop diseases, infestations and droughts.


When were Chinampas used?

John Elk / Getty Images. In the Lake Titicaca region of Bolivia and Peru, chinampas were used as long ago as 1000 BCE, a system which supported the great Tiwanaku civilization.


Is Swidden a sustainable method?

Swidden has its detractors, but when used with appropriate timing, it can be a sustainable method of allowing fallow periods to regenerate the soils.


Has modern farming replaced ancient farming?

Updated May 06, 2019. Ancient farming techniques have all but been replaced by modern mechanized farming in many places around the world . But a growing sustainable agricultural movement, coupled with concerns about the impact of global warming, has led to a resurgence of interest in the processes and struggles of the original inventors …


Is wheat field monocultural?

While monocultural fields are lovely and easy to tend, like this wheat field in Washington state, they are susceptible to crop diseases, infestations and droughts without the use of applied chemicals. Mark Turner / Photolibrary / Getty Images

image


Prehistory


Early Civilization

  • Early civilization can be considered a boom time in agricultural science and technology. Around 5500 BC (7, p26-28), the Sumerian civilization of the Middle East and other early pre Greco-Roman civilizations understood the need for a specialized agricultural workforce for their societies to thrive. It is in this period that we saw the invention of …

See more on environmentalscience.org


Early to Modern Civilization

  • The Middle East continued to see much innovation in the agricultural industries, something that historians refer to as The Arab Agricultural Revolution (10). This was thanks to the diversity of the local topographies, the crops grown in the Middle East and Indus Valley that European societies coveted, and later acted as a trade bridge between Far East and Europe (11). In Europe, little cha…

See more on environmentalscience.org


The Americas

  • Mass agricultural practices were not particularly present in North America until the arrival of the European colonists. It’s certainly not true that the Native Americans had no agriculture; indeed, there is evidence for some limited agricultural practices (16) but it was not universal across the tribes. Some were completely nomadic and some were largely static – these were not geographi…

See more on environmentalscience.org


Modern Farming

  • Modern farming began around the 18thcentury in what is generally referred to as “The British Agricultural Revolution” when several advances and changes were made to farming in a short space of time that saw massive increases in yield and a more efficient process. The three field crop rotation system was replaced with a four field system and sweeping enclosure acts regulat…

See more on environmentalscience.org


The Ecological Age

  • “Sustainability” is the buzzword today as we look to balance several conflicting needs – to protect the environment and to instigate practices that protects it while providing for the growing needs of the future population growth. Today, our food supply feeds 7 billion people and there is still enough surplus for more going forward (20). We know though that some of these practices hav…

See more on environmentalscience.org

Leave a Comment