Why was the south mainly an agricultural society

image

The South has always been a region dominated by agriculture. Long ago, farmers relied upon mule-pulled plows to turn acres of soil, so that crops like tobacco, cotton, and corn could be grown. Farming was a way of life, supporting families with both food and money.

South, 1860–1940

Agriculture in the South was oriented toward large-scale plantations that produced cotton for export, as well as other export products such as tobacco and sugar.

Full
Answer

Why is agriculture important in the south?

The South has always been a region dominated by agriculture. Long ago, farmers relied upon mule-pulled plows to turn acres of soil, so that crops like tobacco, cotton, and corn could be grown. Farming was a way of life, supporting families with both food and money.

What are the characteristics of Southern agriculture?

These localized mills reflected a time period in which independent and self-sustaining attitudes characterized the Southern United States. The sloshing of water, and the hissing of grain characterize the hardworking nature of Southern agriculture. Your browser does not support the audio element.

Why do people in agricultural societies generally lead a more settled lifestyle?

People in an agricultural society generally lead a more settled lifestyle than those in nomadic hunter-gatherer or semi-nomadic pastoral societies because they live permanently near the land that is farmed.

Why is the south so unique?

Learn More in these related Britannica articles: By far the largest of the three original Anglo-American culture areas, the South is also the most idiosyncratic with respect to national norms—or slowest to accept them. Unlike New Englanders, Southerners resided not in villages but on widely scattered plantations.

image


Why did the South become agricultural?

The fertile soil and warm climate of the South made it ideal for large-scale farms to grow crops like tobacco and cotton. Because agriculture was so profitable, few Southerners saw a need for industrial development. Eighty percent of the labor force worked on a farm or plantation.


Why was agriculture so important to the South?

The South has always been a region dominated by agriculture. Long ago, farmers relied upon mule-pulled plows to turn acres of soil, so that crops like tobacco, cotton, and corn could be grown. Farming was a way of life, supporting families with both food and money.


Why was agriculture profitable in the South?

The southern colonies were an ideal place for agriculture. The tidewater left minerals on the tideland which made the soil fertile. The southern colonies were farther south which meant the growing season was longer. The climate was warm and moist which was perfect for growing cash crops.


Did the South rely on agriculture?

In 1860, the South was still predominantly agricultural, highly dependent upon the sale of staples to a world market. By 1815, cotton was the most valuable export in the United States; by 1840, it was worth more than all other exports combined.


When did agriculture develop in South America?

Agriculture began independently in both North and South America ∼10,000 years before present (YBP), within a few thousand years of the arrival of humans in the Americas.


Why was agriculture so important?

Agriculture enabled people to produce surplus food. They could use this extra food when crops failed or trade it for other goods. Food surpluses allowed people to work at other tasks unrelated to farming. Agriculture kept formerly nomadic people near their fields and led to the development of permanent villages.


How was agriculture different in the North and the South?

The northern economy relied on manufacturing and the agricultural southern economy depended on the production of cotton. The desire of southerners for unpaid workers to pick the valuable cotton strengthened their need for slavery.


What was the South’s economy based on?

The upshot: As cotton became the backbone of the Southern economy, slavery drove impressive profits. The benefits of cotton produced by enslaved workers extended to industries beyond the South.


What does the South produce?

The warm climate of the South affords a period of 200–290 frost-free days per year, enabling such profitable crops as tobacco, rice, sugarcane, and cotton to be grown.


Why was the South dependent on the North & Europe for non agricultural goods?

why was the south dependent on the north and Europe for non-agricultural goods? Poor white southerners often lived in the hilly, wooded areas of the upland south, north and west of the cotton belt. they herded cows and pigs and planted crops.


What is the Southern society?

Most southerners were in the Middle Class and were considered yeoman farmers, holding only a few acres and living in modest homes and cabins, raising hogs and chickens, and growing corn and cotton. Few yeoman farmers had any slaves and if they did own slaves, it was only one or two.


What crop dominated southern agriculture?

After the invention of the cotton gin (1793), cotton surpassed tobacco as the dominant cash crop in the agricultural economy of the South, soon comprising more than half the total U.S. exports. The concept of “King Cotton” was first suggested in David Christy’s book Cotton Is King (1855).


What was the South’s form of agriculture?

Not only was the South’s form of agriculture varied from that of the Northwest, but it was substantially more detached from the Union as well. North. The Northwest’s agriculture slowly became more industrialized as the decades went on. By adopting new cultivating techniques, farmers were able to greatly increase production.


Why were the working conditions in the South so hard?

The working conditions in the south tended to be difficult and harsh, due to the sometimes unbearable heat and the cruelty of the slave owners. Slaves lived in prisonlike conditions in some areas and were susceptible to harsh punishment if they disobeyed their master (Brinkley, 289). Comments.


How many bushels of wheat did the North produce in 1850?

For instance, the North produced 499,190,041 total bushels of crops, including wheat, oats and more, in 1850, while the South produced only 481,766,889 bushels of the same crops in the same year. (Helper, 189). The North’s increased crops is most likely due to the recent invention of many farming machines that the South did invent and utilize.


What was the main force that brought farm communities together?

The major force that drew farm communities together was religion, which was one of the only reasons for communication. However, around the time of harvest large numbers of families gathered to bring in the crops allowing families to produce more crops (Brinkley, 275). South.


Why did the North increase crops?

The North’s increased crops is most likely due to the recent invention of many farming machines that the South did invent and utilize. The northern farms were originally centered around little communities, but as they pushed farther west, they became more isolated and only worked with their families to make a profit.


Why were the Northeast and Northwest so self-sufficient?

The Northeast and Northwest were very self-sufficient together; as the Northwest provided the raw materials needed for the Northeast’s steady rate of manufacturing and producing goods for the country. The profitable economic relationship between these two sections though isolated the South’s agriculture.


What did the planters invest in?

These planters, along with capitalists in this area, invested ample amounts of money in land and slave trade, both crucial parts of Southern agriculture. After investing so much money in these areas, it left little to be invested in other areas of trade.


Where are potatoes found in South America?

In the highlands of south-central Chile, potatoes were collected as early as 11,000 bp. By 5000 bp the domesticated potato is found in desert coastal sites; it was apparently domesticated well before that time.


What crops grow in the Amazon basin?

Thus, the development of successful tropical lowland swidden systems with crops such as avocados, cacao, chili peppers, cotton, manioc, corn, papayas, sweet potatoes, and tobacco may have a long history in the Amazon basin.


Why is swidden important?

The long history of swidden production is related to its appropriateness for the tropical lowlands: it helped to maintain local soil fertility and mimicked the ecologically diverse tropical ecosystem. Further, labour-intensive technology was not required.


Was agriculture required for the Inca Empire?

Further, labour-intensive technology was not required. Some researchers have proposed that the nature of tropical lowland ecosystems cannot be understood without acknowledging the long-term presence of swidden agriculture. Agriculture eventually came to support the Inca empire and other highland South American cultures.


What crops did the South grow?

The warm climate of the South affords a period of 200–290 frost-free days per year, enabling such profitable crops as tobacco, rice, sugarcane, and cotton to be grown. This climate, coupled with abundant rainfall, offered 17th- and 18th-century European settlers a superb opportunity to raise crops for export if an adequate permanent labour supply …


What did the antebellum South look for in the textile industry?

Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. Economically, the antebellum and cotton-oriented South looked to the British textile industry for its market and opposed the growing politico-economic power of the industrializing North.


Why did the white South support the Peculiar Institution?

In response, the white South rose to an unqualified defense of its “peculiar institution,” supporting it on the grounds of biblical sanction, economic justification, the supposed racial inferiority of Black people, and the necessity for a well-ordered society.


What states seceded from the Union?

Southern separatism in defense of slavery culminated in 1860–61, when 11 Southern states (South Carolina, Mississippi, Florida, Alabama, Georgia, Louisiana, Texas, Arkansas, North Carolina, Virginia, and Tennessee) seceded from the Union and formed the Confederate States of America. The ensuing Civil War (1861–65) wrought immense destruction on …


What was the impact of the Civil War?

The ensuing Civil War (1861–65) wrought immense destruction on much of the South, which emerged the loser in the conflict. In many areas, cropland was ruined, livestock lost, railroads destroyed, and billions of dollars in slave-related investments wiped out.


What set the South apart from other parts of the country?

The South was historically set apart from other sections of the country by a complex of factors: a long growing season, its staple crop patterns, the plantation system, and Black agricultural labour, whether slave or free.


How many people lived in the South in the 20th century?

During the second half of the 20th century, the population of the South boomed, exceeding 100 million by the end of the century, when the increasingly urban region contained two-fifths of the nation’s 50 largest metropolitan areas. By the 2000 census, Texas had surpassed New York as the second most populous state.


Why do people live in agricultural societies?

People in an agricultural society generally lead a more settled lifestyle than those in nomadic hunter-gatherer or semi-nomadic pastoral societies because they live permanently near the land that is farmed.


What is an agricultural society?

An agricultural society, also known as an agrarian society, is a society that constructs social order around a reliance upon farming. More than half the people living in that society make their living by farming. People in an agricultural society generally lead a more settled lifestyle than those in nomadic …


What are modern societies based on?

Though there are modern societies based upon agriculture, most societies today are either industrial societies, or societies that depend on mass production of goods using technological means, or postindustrial societies, which are societies dependent on services rather than goods.


What were the most common innovations in agricultural societies?

This included such things as grains and vegetables, but also included beasts of burden and farming implements. Animal labor formed one of the most widespread innovations of agricultural societies.


How did trade between agrarian societies help facilitate the development of currency?

Trade between larger agrarian societies helped facilitate the development of currency. Trade goods were bulky and not always easy to transport long distances between metropolitan areas. Currency, usually in the form of precious metal coinage, was developed to help people have something of value that was easy to trade.


Why were commoners allowed to work the land?

Commoners were allowed to work the land in exchange for protection and a small share of the resources they helped gather. In an ideal feudal society, the lowest tier of the social order, the serfs, benefited wholly from providing labor for their lord’s interests.


What did people do in cities?

Some people lived in cities. They performed different jobs, such as teaching, making and selling goods such as military weapons, or constructing roads or ships. People living in cities were often better educated and enjoyed more personal mobility than those tied directly to the land.

image

Leave a Comment